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Is this something that breeders are keeping an eye on?

http://www.vin.com/proceedings/Proceedings.plx?CID=WSAVA2004&PID=8889&O=Generic
http://www.videxgsd.com/lumbosacral_transitional_vertebrae.htm
http://www.grunfeldshepherds.com/articles/lanting/pdfs/TVS.pdf



Quote: Transitional lumbosacral vertebral anomaly in the dog: a radiographic study.
J Small Anim Pract. 1999 Apr;40(4):167-72.
Morgan JP.
Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis 95616, USA.

Transitional lumbosacral vertebral anomalies have for some time been suggested as a possible cause of cauda equina syndrome (especially in the German shepherd dog [GSD]), a condition recently thought to be inherited. The frequency of this condition within a large clinical population and the radiographic features used in its detection are reported. In a group of 143 patients, the sexes were similarly represented and the GSD was greatly overrepresented. The anomaly is characterised by separation of the first sacral segment that was identified on the lateral view by the presence of a radiolucent disc space between what are normally the first and second sacral segments. On the ventrodorsal view, the anomaly was characterised by separation of the spinous processes between what are normally the first and second sacral segments. In the presence of the transitional segment, the nature of the sacroiliac joint at the level of the anomalous segment varies from a strong ilial attachment, with the presence of a wing-like lateral process, to a weakened ilial attachment because of the presence of a lateral process, shaped as that seen on a lumbar segment. These patterns were present unilaterally or bilaterally and result in symmetrical or asymmetrical patterns. The effect of the weakening of the sacroiliac attachment was thought to result in premature disc degeneration, which, together with spinal canal stenosis, resulted in potential compression of the overlying spinal nerves and creation of a cauda equina syndrome. The condition is thought to have clinical significance and should be selected against in breeding, especially in the GSD.
 

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Yes and it is something OFA notes when you send in your hip x-rays.
 

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It was noted on Dante's prelims, though not on his finals at 2. I assume 'cause it was noted on the prelim??
 

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Was poking around OFA and came across this:
Quote:My OFA report says "Transitional Vertebrae" below the phenotypic hip evaluation. What does this mean?
Transitional vertebra is an incidental radiographic finding noted during the evaluation process. Transitional vertebrae are a congenital malformation of the spine that occurs at the junctions of major divisions of the spine. Transitional vertebrae take on anatomic characteristics of both divisions of the spine it occurs between. The most common type of transitional vertebrae reported by the OFA is in the lumbar-sacral area where the last lumbar vertebral body takes on anatomic characteristics of the sacrum. Transitional vertebrae are usually not associated with clinical signs and the dog can be used in a breeding program. The OFA recommends breeding the dog to a dog with a clear family history for transitional vertebrae.
http://www.offa.org/faq.html#13
 

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I'd be interested in seeing an x-ray of what this looks like.
 

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I need help. I can only find a few articles on this site about fused Vertebrae. Nicki is 6 yo and she started limping this past winter. We have some land and she loves chasing deer, squirrels, etc. I took her to the vet and he slept her and her last 2 vertebra 7&8 are fused. I am a nurse and her vertebrae definitely fuse, but her hips appear to be in great shape. He gave us some pain meds to give her when she exhibits a lot of pain. I only give them when she is obviously in too much pain. My heart is breaking. All of my previous GSD's were healthy as far as bones go. One case of bloat was because I left him with my mother. Long story, accidental neglect he did not make it-7yo. Never left another dog.
 
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