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Discussion Starter #1
So I have joined my local club and pay every training session but thus far it seems very slow. I am just tugging on toys is this normal I understand building the drive in a dog but when I ask questions the answer is vague and just that we will get there. No tips for homework or anything? If anybody has tips or reassurance that this is normal or a seasoned handler would feel comfortable talking with me once in a while it would be appreciated?
Thanks

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How long have you been going to training? Are you started on tracking? Obedience? any bitework?
 

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I pay my club monthly to train. Before each session the decoy(also the TD) and I will go over what the plan is and that we understand it. As the decoy is working my dog he is providing feedback and when the session is over he gives me an assessment and tells me what we will work on the next session. If there is work I can do at home to help he will tell me or I will ask and pick his brain if I am struggling with a concept.

Express your questions and concerns to the TD and talk to other club members to see if this is typical in how they operate.
 

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I agree with Steve, it depends on the dog. when I was gauging my dogs interest and suitability for bite work we seemed to be going at a snails pace as well but that's because my dogs progress was slow. his confidence was more important than my expectations or frustration tho!
 

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My club will 'put a young dog up' for a time if there is a reason to do so...we do not rush pups to do protection if they are really high in prey or pups that tend to be on the more defensive side. Better to let some maturity happen and in the protection time at training, the handler will do some drive building or focus work during that session rather than have the helper do the same ole same ole.
Reading the dogs natural drives and tapping or maintaining them is important. Not pressuring when the brain isn't ready is always key for balancing drives as the goal.
No rush to title....
and thankfully our TD is very good about explaining and answering questions. Newbies learn very quickly about the aspects of drive state, timing of rewards and the 'helper' side of the work.
 

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You can work a defensive puppy in protection from early on.

I have a new dog here for the last 3 weeks. Most of what I am doing obedience wise involves her just barking at me, eating, chasing and biting stuff. To many people try to start the dog doing complex behaviours before the dog has shown the proper activity level, drive and desire for the work.

Thats how you get a flat dog that falls out of drive 5 minutes into your routine.

If they cant explain to you what it is you are doing and why go train somewhere else.
 

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So I have joined my local club and pay every training session but thus far it seems very slow. I am just tugging on toys is this normal I understand building the drive in a dog but when I ask questions the answer is vague and just that we will get there. No tips for homework or anything? If anybody has tips or reassurance that this is normal or a seasoned handler would feel comfortable talking with me once in a while it would be appreciated?
Thanks

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It probably seems vague Josh, because its a little bit of a feeling out period with some pups, more then others. There isn't a set do this then that. When you start adding some ob and control, there'll be more for you to concentrate on. Did you join Way Out West?
 

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Some clubs do no protection until the dog has it's BH. (the pups don't see a helper until they have their BH) Others work in prey early. The club TD can see your pup and you. We, obviously, can't. I'd go with their plan. It may seem slow but it's an opportunity to have fun with your pup, to reenforce that training and the field are fun for the pup.
 

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Much of what we call training, is actually foundation work. It takes time to build a solid foundation, but the better the foundation, the more you can build on top of it.

Eventually, down the road, you'll get the 'aha' moment where you'll see how all this play that seemed to not produce anything, falls together into the big picture. I echo others, be patient, you AND your dog are picking up skills that will pay off later when the training becomes more formal.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I appreciate all the responses I agree that right now what we're doing is laying the foundation I just wish I could be more involved at home when I brought up buying a tug or anything I was just told there was no need. This is my first SportDog that I will train myself

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Most of the time work you might do at home could be counter productive due to your inexperience. I know it is frustrating waiting, but each dog develops and progresses at its own speed.
 
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