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My 8-9 month old puppy, Mack, is very attached to my husband, children, and I, to the point where if we are outside, and he can see one of us but not GET to us, he goes nuts. He doesn’t otherwise have much separation anxiety - he tolerates us leaving after putting him in his crate very well, he walked away calmly with a vet tech at the vet last week, etc. Example: yesterday, I sent the kids down the steps from the deck to the backyard and held Mack’s collar to keep him from rushing down and knocking them over. When the kids got to the backyard and Mack was stuck at the top, he started YOWLING, loudly, like someone was torturing him. For 5 full minutes. Obviously, I wasn’t going to give in to that, so I put him in a down-stay and held his pinch collar. He continued to make an insane amount fo noise and try to creep forward down the stairs. I waited for a brief silent pause and then let him go. The same thing happens if I stay on the front steps with him while my husband goes to the end of the driveway to talk to someone across the street.

Mack is very trainable, I’m just not sure quite how to attack this problem. Our last german Shepherd had this issue too but wasn’t SO insanely loud about it. Advice welcome!
 

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I usually try, correct unwanted behaviour, distract with different behaviour, reward new behaviour.

For example. with training collar on and a leash, have kids do the same thing that triggered the whining before. When he whines, leash pop and say no. This is primarily to break his train of thought and to get his attention. Command him to tie down, When he does reward him once he is calm. Rinse, lather, repeat.
 

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Does he do it if you are not holding the collar? Some dogs will pull hard enough on a pinch collar to shriek because of the correction they are getting but they don't know how to make the correction stop.
 

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I approached the barking issue from two sides with Ole.

1. We worked a lot on the place command for self-control. IE, I would have Ole go to his bed and remain quiet. Over the course of a couple of months, he got so that he could control himself enough that he would remain on his place after I sent him there for an hour... even if there were strangers in the house. For practice, I would tie his house line to my leg while I sat in my chair next to him. I would reward him with tasty treats for good behavior.

2. We worked on coming and going. During our walks and adventures, I would attach his lead to a picnic table, piece of playground equipment, or tree. Then I would briefly walk away from him and walk back to him. Over time, this increased so that I could walk around a building and be gone for 10-15 minutes with him remaining completely calm.

I trained this a lot like teaching stay. At first, I would take a couple of steps away and walk right back. I would walk back and reward him if he was calm. If he threw a fit, I would turn my back and ignore him until he calmed himself down. Eventually, I added distance, duration, and distractions. Pretty soon, he got the idea that every time I left, I would come back.

I tried to get Ole to think that he was guarding the space when I left it. If I 'just' left, he would lay down and look pathetic. If I left something like a water bowl or my backpack for him to guard, he would hang out proudly until I got back.
 
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If the OP figures this out, I want to hear about it. My now 6 yo gets very vocal if she thinks we might be going outside. She could have come in 2 minutes ago but the response is the same... What I have taken to is shut the hall door to the back entrance, open the back door, open the hall door - cuts down on the vocalization significantly -- "wait" command works in this situation but not going out the front door which doesn't have the same hall set up..
 
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