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Discussion Starter #1
I was wondering if there is a general timeframe in which a dog should learn certain things.

For example:
6-8 weeks its name, marker, sit and down. 8-10 weeks heel, place etc.
10-12 weeks climb etc.

And also, in what order should one teach what commands and how long or how many repititions does it take to inderstand a command? How do you know if you are done with teaching one and starting another?

Do you teach 1x action untill he/she gets it before you move on or do you teach more than one action on the same day?



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There's no time frame.It's easiest to teach one thing at a time,then practice in different places.When your puppy can focus on you no matter where you are and whatever distractions are going on,you know they have thoroughly learned it.
 

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It all depends on you, the puppy and your training methods.



If I"m teaching something new then I only do a session with that. But I might do other sessions with things they already know to either advance it or maintain it.


You know you can move on when the dog is doing it quickly and repetitively. Keep your sessions short. 5 minutes for a puppy or something new. And dogs learn on their downtime. So let them be alone for a bit after a training session. Put them in a crate and let them chill for a bit.
 

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It totally depends on the dog/pup. I once had a foster Aussie of 10 weeks old and taught her the basics in one afternoon on command, using the clicker. I wondered what her new owner was going to teach her the next twelve years. She was an exception though.
 

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There is no time frame and no order - with a a small puppy keep things short and interesting and fun. Don't let them get bored and training finishes on a bad note... stop training whilst they are still enjoying it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I usually do 5 min sessions 3x a day.
She is eager to learn and has a high drive for treats and really enjoys everything.

She knows her name, her marker, sit, down and come. Initially I started with 1x type of command and did that command for a week, even though she got it sooner. Then I moved on to another command and did the same. I am now mixing commands so she needs to listen to what command she needs to perform instead of just repeating the same thing over and over again for a treat.

During the other time she plays A LOT with my Jack Russel pup and they both have a lot of energy and keep each other busy. We also play some fetch and tug.

Im busy bringing in the leash to get her used to it and to give in to the leash. I have a Halti as well and want to introduce it to her learning later on when the time is right.

Ultimately, I want to train her as a sniffing/tracking dog.



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I was wondering if there is a general timeframe in which a dog should learn certain things.

For example:
6-8 weeks its name, marker, sit and down. 8-10 weeks heel, place etc.
10-12 weeks climb etc.

And also, in what order should one teach what commands and how long or how many repititions does it take to inderstand a command? How do you know if you are done with teaching one and starting another?

Do you teach 1x action untill he/she gets it before you move on or do you teach more than one action on the same day?



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Here is my pup at 4 months old to give you an idea, he also knew wait, touch, ring the bells to go out potty and spot. We kept training sessions relatively short but frequent. Maybe 5 minutes 10 times a day.
 

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I don't understand the "I do 3 training sessions a day". That would be at the most working for 30 minutes with your pup. What about all the other times besides naps and night's sleep? Training is ongoing and should be integrated in their day. Actually every time you and your puppy are together one of you is training the other.
 

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I don't understand the "I do 3 training sessions a day". That would be at the most working for 30 minutes with your pup. What about all the other times besides naps and night's sleep? Training is ongoing and should be integrated in their day. Actually every time you and your puppy are together one of you is training the other.
That is actually a really good point I forgot to mention in my post. We did more formal "training sessions" to teach silly tricks like bang bang and paw. But we also practiced Nothing In Life Is Free. Before we went out the door he had to sit and wait. Before he was allowed to eat his food he had to lay down and stay. When we walked on the leash I rewarded for proper heeling and not pulling. I would put each of his meals for the day into a treat pouch and wore it all day except when we were sleeping. He was always being "taught" something and rewarded for good behavior to enforce the things we wanted to see more of out of him. We rarely used actual treats but instead always worked with his food kibble.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I don't understand the "I do 3 training sessions a day". That would be at the most working for 30 minutes with your pup. What about all the other times besides naps and night's sleep? Training is ongoing and should be integrated in their day. Actually every time you and your puppy are together one of you is training the other.
I realise that now. Lucky she is still 10 weeks so I can up those numbers.

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That is actually a really good point I forgot to mention in my post. We did more formal "training sessions" to teach silly tricks like bang bang and paw. But we also practiced Nothing In Life Is Free. Before we went out the door he had to sit and wait. Before he was allowed to eat his food he had to lay down and stay. When we walked on the leash I rewarded for proper heeling and not pulling. I would put each of his meals for the day into a treat pouch and wore it all day except when we were sleeping. He was always being "taught" something and rewarded for good behavior to enforce the things we wanted to see more of out of him. We rarely used actual treats but instead always worked with his food kibble.
So it is fine to rather use her meals to train her all day long instead of just feeding her 3x s day? I get it then. That is exactly why Im asking these things.

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So it is fine to rather use her meals to train her all day long instead of just feeding her 3x s day? I get it then. That is exactly why Im asking these things.

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Yes that is exactly what I did, others might have different methods. But I would measure out his meals for the day and put them in the treat pouch. Save those high value reward treats for things she has most difficulty with or problems focusing, you'll need them later. Keep in mind you should not be feeding the food all at once, if you normally feed her 3 X a day you should be spreading the food out evenly throughout the day so she doesn't get too hungry and working with her almost constantly. if at the end of the day you have most of her days meal left in the food pouch you didn't work with her enough. Kibble can also be put in brain toys like kongs, sometimes I feed entire meals in one of those rubber toys. It keeps her busy for a while, teaches independence and tires out a puppys brain. Another great exercise for tiring out a pup is you can set up a trail of kibble outside and let her spend time searching for it. Hide yourself even and when she comes running to find you give her a jack pot. It's so much fun thinking up creative games to train a young pup, the possibilities are endless!
 

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Don’t forget to just let the puppy be a puppy, too. So many people get caught up on having a perfectly trained dog at a young age, who knows a million tricks, that they miss out on the joy from just watching them explore their world and occasionally get into trouble. A lot of confidence can be built by just letting your puppy be a dog.

Shaping behaviors and teaching commands is an important part of raising a dog. But it’s not the only part of raising a dog.
 

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Don’t forget to just let the puppy be a puppy, too. So many people get caught up on having a perfectly trained dog at a young age, who knows a million tricks, that they miss out on the joy from just watching them explore their world and occasionally get into trouble. A lot of confidence can be built by just letting your puppy be a dog.

Shaping behaviors and teaching commands is an important part of raising a dog. But it’s not the only part of raising a dog.
Very true. Believe me she plays a lot on the farm with all of us and the jack russel pup.

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