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Discussion Starter #1
I cannot afford to hire or go to a trainer, I can afford vet visits and such because they are absolutely necessary, but not training that may or may not benefit us.
Socializing isn't a problem, we have free groups, not training, but well-behaved dogs getting together for walks and playing.

What are the best methods? I like the looks of NILIF, and used it a bit with our other dogs. I have general training down, focus, recall, walking nicely with big distractions ect. but I want obedience.
What is a good at-home obedience training practice?
 

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I will only do positive training, yes, if my dog lunges at someone I will correct firmly, but I am not about to use the I'm-the-big-bad-alpha things that I've seen my local trainers do.
 

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what do you mean by "good at home training practice"?
whatever training takes place in class you can teach
at home. i'm not sure if i understand your question.

i'm-the-big-bad-alpha, i've never practiced that.
i socialize, train and co-exist with my dogs.
my dogs are always friendly and sociable. i've never tried to dominate a dog nor have i had a dog try to dominate me.

i find through socializing and training makes a great bond. i also
an anticipator when it comes to my dogs reactions.
i expect my dogs to jump up, have accidents in the house, no recall, run into the street, lunge or do what ever i don't want them to do. to prevent or help prevent unwanted behaviour i cut it
off before it happens most of the time. when someone approaches
my dog i take the slack out of the leash so he can't jump up. i teach boundaries so my dogs know the street is off limits whether
their on the leash or off.

training, socializing, anticipation and consistency makes a nicely trained dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What I mean by that is other methods like NILIF, which is used a lot by people at home, as well as trainers, is I wanted to know if there were any more methods like that that I can do a lot of reading up on. Lot of advice I've seen given here and other places is "get into some obedience classes.... Find a good trainer..." Maybe that's given to people they don't think can handle it themselves.

Thank you for the reply, I found it helpful.
 

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Read up on clicker training. Easy to do yourself and a good alternative to the i'm-the-big-bad-alpha method as you call it.
 

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Originally Posted By: RavenSophiRead up on clicker training. Easy to do yourself and a good alternative to the i'm-the-big-bad-alpha method as you call it.
I do clicker train


I just hate going to watch a puppy class and seeing the 'trainer' do, or tell people the wrong things. I just want to scream, this one pup (during socializing time, on lead) did a play bow and a little playful growl, the trainer promptly snatched the leash and gave the biggest correction I've ever seen, saying that the pup was about to attack! Then the owner scolded the dog.
I have to wonder if this 'trainer' is going on his own imagination.

Thank you. =)
 

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Stupid people do stupid things... including trainers. Clicker or marker training (same thing but without a clicker) is by far the best way to communicate to your dog in a concise manner and train virtually anything provided your timing is correct. Also research "backchaining" to teach more complicated exercises by breaking them down into parts and then combining later.
 

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Yes they do... I have to wonder if it's a bunch of ground up slugs between some peoples' ears at times.

Thank you very much, I will look it up.
 

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Originally Posted By: APBTLove
I just hate going to watch a puppy class and seeing the 'trainer' do, or tell people the wrong things. I just want to scream, this one pup (during socializing time, on lead) did a play bow and a little playful growl, the trainer promptly snatched the leash and gave the biggest correction I've ever seen, saying that the pup was about to attack! Then the owner scolded the dog.
I have to wonder if this 'trainer' is going on his own imagination.
There should really be stricter rules when it comes to being a trainer. Joining a club and training your dog there for a year or two and then becoming a trainer, as often happens, is just not good enough. Most clubs or training schools around here work that way and it is sickening that they know so little about training and dog behaviour and psychology but still get the chance to train. Of course they mess up the dogs and qualified trainers are left to clean up behind them that is if the poor owners can find one and don't resort to putting the dog to sleep. *sigh* Makes my blood boil!
 

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Originally Posted By: APBTLoveLot of advice I've seen given here and other places is "get into some obedience classes.... Find a good trainer..." Maybe that's given to people they don't think can handle it themselves.
Actually, no. Even in a class you're doing most of the training between classes, on your own. Class is usually just an hour a week. Even very experienced trainers and competitors, such as MaggieRoseLee in agility, still take classes with their dogs. The best trainers, either professional, or those of us just training our companion dogs to be well behaved and have good manners so we can take them places and have fun adventures, are always learning. Not to mention that each dog is different, and what might work perfectly with one dog may not be the best method with another dog. A fresh eye and some new ideas that we pick up in a training class might be just the ticket. I've taken 11 classes with 3 different dogs in just over 4 years and each and every one of them has been totally worthwhile, even when we've been covering skills that my dogs already mostly knew.

Sorry, I'm at work and that's all I have time for, but I just had to respond to that. I don't mean that you can't and shouldn't do a lot of training on your own even if you never are able to go to a training class for whatever reason. But classes are not just for those who "can't do it on their own". And NILIF is an excellent place to start.
 

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Originally Posted By: APBTLoveWhat are the best methods?
The best methods are the ones that work best for YOUR dog. Seriously, every dog is different and you could use different techniques on all of them.


I like to start with 100% positive and go 'down' from there. I use positive motivation to TEACH my dogs something and then I proof and proof and proof and only when I am 100% sure they KNOW what I expect from them do I add corrections for non-compliance.

Quote:What is a good at-home obedience training practice?
Sit down and decide WHAT you want to teach your dogs.

Do you want a perfect heel with 100% attention when you are taking the dog for a walk? Or do you just want to the dog not pull on the leash?

Have a set of specific goals in mind before you start training, then train towards those goals.
 

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Here's a great online resource for training - from raising a puppy up right, to teaching basic obedience skills, to solving problem behavior: http://www.dogstardaily.com/training

And I totally agree with Lauri - it's your dog, you get to decide what's most important to you, and what doesn't matter so much. Focus most of your training efforts towards the important stuff and if you have extra time, do the other stuff too if you feel like it. Or not.


For me, a loose leash where they're not dragging me down the street, and especially, being trustworthy offleash at the park, are far more important than a perfect heel. So I spend the bulk of my training on those priorities.
 

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I do think it's possible to train your dog all on your own, but I personally really like going to class because it helps me figure out what I'm doing wrong or how to communicate better with my dog. We looked a long time for a trainer we would like, and now we drive over an hour each way for it. COMPLETELY worth it. It sounds like the trainer you mentioned really doesn't have a clue about dog behavior, so obviously you don't want to go with them. Sometimes if you explain your financial situation to a good trainer they may be willing to give you a cut rate, or work only on the things that are important to you. You'd be surprised at what people will do if you just ask.

Also, I don't think training should be about bullying your dog into doing what you want, it should be based on a relationship of respect and love. If the dog respects you, and you communicate what you want properly to the dog, you shouldn't have major problems training (assuming that the dog has been properly socialized). I used to be worried that training would break my dog's spirit, but now I see that it helps me enhance the good traits of my pup, and the dog enjoys it. I'm not saying that you can't do this yourself, just that a session with a GOOD trainer is worth it, and can help you in the long run.
 
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