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Good to know! Thanks for posting this!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
:thumbup:


I hope people take note as this can happen in any state!


We experienced this algae 3 years ago while vacationing in Michigan.
 

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Is there a specific test? How does anyone know which is dangerous, by color?
 

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Is there a specific test? How does anyone know which is dangerous, by color?

Honestly, I don't know. If there's a Red Tide, everyone knows not to take dogs near the water, but unless there's been a die-off of fish or dogs have died, we never really know unless it's on the news. I don't take mine to standing water, only brooks, but I wonder about my skungey goose pond, though I suppose the geese are alive, and the puppy's gone swimming in it, must be ok.
 

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I'm afraid to even let my dogs swim in our pond because of this. I have not figured out a way to send off water for testing.

I've read the information sites about it and although there is algae in our pond is does not meet any of the criteria for the deadly kind.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Is there a specific test? How does anyone know which is dangerous, by color?

I found the following info & picture guide from the NY Dept. of Health:

What are harmful blue-green algae? Blue-green algae, technically known as cyanobacteria, are microscopic organisms that are naturally present in lakes and streams. Under certain conditions, blue-green algae can become abundant in warm, shallow, undisturbed, nutrient-rich surface waters that receive a lot of sunlight. When this occurs, blue-green algae can form blooms that discolor the water, or produce floating mats or scums on the water’s surface. It might be a harmful blue-green algae bloom if the water is blue-green, green, yellow, white, brown, purple, or red, has a paint-like appearance, or if there is scum on the water surface.

Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) Photo Gallery - NYS Dept. of Environmental Conservation

The kind we experienced looked like someone had poured Turquois paint by the dock with an unforgettable smell.



The following info is from Kansas Dept of Health

DYI Jar or Stick test....but not 100% accurate:

http://www.kdheks.gov/algae-illness/download/Jar_Test.pdf


It gave a site for testing private ponds, but the site does not work!
 

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I know Florida has terrible seaweed problems. Gross smelly rotten seaweed taking over the beach. It all seems connected. Lots of actual real crap from sewers, ships ,boats actually have polluted and gets in our waters it really is disturbing to see how much. The damage it causes. They have and continue be making changes slowly and good to hear about the recycling sewer water around the world for farming purposes and other uses. Recycling sewer water into drinking water which is a bit hard to swallow but seems to be an answer for water shortage.
 

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Climate change causing warmer water temperatures will continue to make this problems worse.

My son is a surfer and monitors water temps year round here in Fl. He has mentioned several

times that the average temp of ocean water here has risen in last few years.

Also we've had high fecal/coliform bacteria in beach waters all along the Fl. coast.

We have so many water contamination problems today that we've never had before and it

will continue to get worse.

Our politicians need to take their heads out of the sand and get to work on this or we are doomed.
 

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It happens every year. The nitrogen on the fields wash into the water ways and create the perfect environment for the blue-green algae. The beaches usually have signs or warnings once it's found. The Finger Lakes are heavily affected by this.
 

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It happens every year. The nitrogen on the fields wash into the water ways and create the perfect environment for the blue-green algae. The beaches usually have signs or warnings once it's found. The Finger Lakes are heavily affected by this.
When we lived on the Chesapeake Bay we made sure to stay out of the water the 2nd half of summer each year. Between the heat, run off from vacationers and a dump of fresh water from rain, bacteria levels of all kinds went up.
 

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Is there a specific test? How does anyone know which is dangerous, by color?
If you have ever owned a fish tank with plants, you'll know what it looks like. In "fish tank" form, it grows as a thick, dark, blue-green slime over everything stationary in the tank. It has a strong smell like wet earth.

This usually happens when you have a nitrate-light imbalance: too many nitrates and too much light together. The only way to get rid of it in a tank is to physically wipe it off or drain the tank and bleach everything. In this form, it's fairly non-toxic to everything in the tank, though it will kill your plants as it blocks light on the leaves.

When it's in a lake, it does the same thing by forming a slime on the bottom of the lake. However, because lakes have larger currents, it'll also float around in particles in the water, turning the water that classic blue-green color. Or the slime itself will float in mats. Given that I live near, and swim in, Lake Allatoona, I'm certain it's present every year (thing turns positively emerald in the summer), but in small amounts. It seems like this year, the Southeast is getting a nasty, big algal bloom of the stuff.

Here are some examples.

In a fish tank on moss.



Floating on a lake surface and growing on a log in NC. Note the slime.



Floating on the surface and growing under the surface of shallows. Note the vibrant blue-green color of the water.

 
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