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Need some help on the subject. Damian is only 5 months old right now. I won't even consider the idea until after he is a year old, but I want to get some insight early on.

I was CONSIDERING breeding him when the time came, but honestly, I know nothing about the subject and I do not want to be an irresponsible breeder. I do not think I can devote the time I personally think is required to breed dogs. (Time to earn titles, etc. to make him breed worthy).

With that said, I was still juggling the idea of keeping him intact. I've gotten all my past dogs neutored and after the process, their energy level and excitement levels were drastically reduced. These were all non-GSD, so I'm not sure if thats how its going to be, thats why I'm asking for help. The only downside I had to the one intact dog I had (Lab) was that he did the humpage a bit more. Not even enough to make it problematic, but it was a bit more often. Once we finally got him neutored, he gained a crazy amount of weight, and just didn't seem excited like he used too.

Can you guys help me gather a list of the pro's and con's to this process so I can figure out the best solution?

I'm sure there is lots of info on the subject, but I think I'm a search noob still. Thanks for your guys' continuous help I've received lately. Its really made my puppy experience an easier one!
 

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How about a vasectomy? Also, you do not need to breed just because he is intact. Another thing to consider is that a lot of intact males are not very social with other dogs so if visiting dog parks is high on your list, you may wish to neuter. Your dog may be perfectly fine with his ballsies but other dogs can and do perceive intact males as threats and a fight could start just because your sweet boy smells too manly.
 

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Not to be rude
but its
"neuter"
My dog is 1 yr & is not neutered. But is very very excitable.
Quite hard to control sometimes.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Oh I didn't mean to sound like I needed to neuter him if he wasn't going to be bred. I was just throwing my idea's out there. I guess I just want to hear some opinions from people that have experiences on both sides of the subject.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Originally Posted By: Angel RNot to be rude
but its
"neuter"
My dog is 1 yr & is not neutered. But is very very excitable.
Quite hard to control sometimes.
Oops, I'm used to Google Chrome. Edits my spelling for me, I'm at work at the moment on Internet Explorer. Thanks for the fix.
 

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As long as you are willing to take the extra care that your dog not be able to escape or run off and possibly find a female dog in season and be a daddy, I dont see anything wrong at all with keeping your dog intact. Humping is more a behavior problem rather than an intact dog problem. Ive seen MANY altered dogs hump other dogs and people like crazy.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm not worried about Damian getting out and being a daddy. We have a pretty secure piece of property. With that said, I think it would be pointless to have a vasectomy. From doing a bit of searching, it seems the main reason i personally would neuter is to eliminate the testicular cancer and prostate tumors. Are these issues that common in GSD's? Anyone ever have this problem?

BTW, I love your Dalmatians. I lost the thread where I asked you about behavior issues with Dalmatians and kids, so I never was able to see your response.
 

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I think it depends on what you want for your dog. I agree with this...

Originally Posted By: DianaMAnother thing to consider is that a lot of intact males are not very social with other dogs so if visiting dog parks is high on your list, you may wish to neuter. Your dog may be perfectly fine with his ballsies but other dogs can and do perceive intact males as threats and a fight could start just because your sweet boy smells too manly.
I have 3 intact males in my house. They don't generally pick fights, but they won't back off of them either. They all pretty much get along with females and submissive dogs, but I have to watch out for other males that are dominant dogs or rough players. I don't find that any of them have any problems with people, but you can tell they get a little antsy and snotty when my bitch comes into heat, and things get a little testosteroni when they hit the 2ish year mark. But I like the way the males fill out, I think it's healthier, and I think it's helpful for my training. Also, I don't really have any of the other problems that people generally associate with intact males- marking, roaming, humping.
 

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i was going to leave the cashman intact since i had some problems relating to the anesthesia with my last boy when he was neutered, which left me afraid of cash having general anesthesia. then he began having some urinary tract/prostate problems (at age 5), and three vet consults were all the same...he needs to be neutered.

no ill effects whatsoever, he had already reached his full developmental maturity and, if anything, he broadened and deepened even more. it did not change his personality at all, he is still a handfull, but has not had anymore "guy" problems.

http://sera-and-cash.blogspot.com
 

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Here is a thought from the veterinary world. (Not always publicly known, since we don't always have responsible owners.)
In general, it is now known that keeping your male dog intact until full sexual maturity actually decreases his chance of prostatic CANCER in his later life. (This isn't to say he wont get an enlarged prostate, but the chances of it becoming cancerous are MUCH less.)
Sexual maturity in large breeds is 2 years of age up to 4, depending on the genetics of the dog.
Not neutering your male early will also help to control excessive growth. Mr. Frodo was a HUGE pup. At just 2 weeks, he was 5 1/2 pounds. (No teeth, and eyes were still shut) He had a shattered hock that we put into a cast. I was concerned that he would become a big dog with a horrendous hind end, and I wanted to give him every chance to grow as sturdy as he could. He is within breed standards today, at a year and 1/2. (84 pounds and much shorter than I had feared.) His muscle mass is beautiful for a dog with a fused hock.
I am going to neuter him. I have a breed bitch in this house, and although he has NEVER been a rude boy, I don't ever want to take that chance. (And playing the separation game is a pain, if I know I'm not going to breed him!
)
He will see his second birthday before I go there.
Frodo has never been a bad Boy, because he is not allowed to be. Sniffing, humping and dominance get sharply corrected in this house. (Thank God for the bitch pack!
)
He is expected to sit like everyone else for nails, grooming, etc. He grumbles, complains, and sometimes cries like a baby, but he is expected to behave.
If you are willing to be the boss, then I think you will have no problems.
If you can reduce the chance of cancer, and then wipe out prostate problems when you neuter after 2, all the better.
 

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I totally agree with the above post. I am new here, but not new to owning dogs. My lab is 6 and intact. He does not nor never has humped, marked, or been aggressive. These above issues to me are about training and are easily corrected at a young age. He is not hyper or ill behaved at all, but other males do not always get along with him if they too are intact so it is something I am conscious of when we go to the dog park:)
 

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The GSD dog I have now, is a female that was spayed much too young imo. I rescued her and according to her records she was spayed at 4.5 months old. MUCH too young!
But, I used to have a beautiful male golden retriever, he was intact until just over 2 years of age. I only neutered him because I had his hips x-rayed and they were deemed "fair". I decided fair wasn't good enough to use his for breeding, so I had him neutered. For him, it was a mistake. He was near perfect in every way before the surgery. Never aggressive, never over-sexed, super confident and out-going, gorgeous silky coat, great muscle tone and not overly food driven.
All that changed after neutering. He was clingy and a less self confident, his main interest in life was now FOOD, and his coat became wispy and sort of curly. I see plenty of dogs that need to be neutered for temperament problems or what not, but my dog did not benefit from neutering...unless it saved him from some kind of cancer??
 

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I will say myself, family and friends have always had neutered male dogs who were vigorous, healthy and lived good long lives. Neutered at all ages, granted not purebred GSDs, so that might have some impact on their longevity. Zeb, a GSD-Golden was my sister's dog who lived to 14, Kramer was 16, Mookie passed away after my dad died, he was only 11, a very large Lab mix who kind of lost interest after my dad was gone. My sister's Chow-Shep mix Harley was 13 or 14 and he ate REALLY crappy food all his life.

The smaller breed dogs of my aunts of course lived longer.

So that's anecdotal information only. But shows that a male dog will, yes, eventually pass away, since there is no cure for death yet, and that even being neutered they ran and played hard, were great dogs, full of life, and not negatively impacted by their neuters.

I've asked my vets and I know people think they have an agenda, to make money - but here they make a ton of money off hit by car and still tell people to leash their dogs, weird huh? Anyway, they see about 1-2 cases of bone cancer a year.

The bottom line like someone says is if you have a strong preference not to neuter you also need as strong a resolve to keep your dog from appearing on the Maury baby daddy shows.
 

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It depends on the dog and the training. Rush is four and intact. He does not mark (in the house) and is not a humper. Because our obedience classes often end in a CGC and the TDI has a CGC portion, Rush has passed the test four or five times and has never bothered another dog, male, female, speutered or not. I do ask others if their dogs are intact because I want to know and want to be able to notice any reaction from either dog.

He did have an issue with my brother's neutered older male, but they were put together, both as dominant dogs to live together, and the little dog (dachsund/beagle mix) attacked him the moment he set foot in the house.

The idea that intact dogs roam more than speutered animals is a containment issue that should be addressed regardless to the dog's status.

There are people out there that want everything with four feet to be desexed. I do not see the need so long as you keep the dog contained properly.
 

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Originally Posted By: JeanKBBMMMAAN

The bottom line like someone says is if you have a strong preference not to neuter you also need as strong a resolve to keep your dog from appearing on the Maury baby daddy shows.
 

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I don't see as many of the health benefits to neutering as I do to spaying but I also haven't seen any detriment. Like Jean, my family has had many neutered male dogs and all have lived long healthy lives, all well into their teens.

Fostering dogs I've seen many of the behavioral issues from not neutering. I'm not saying all unneutered dogs are going to do this stuff, but it does happen a lot and there really does seem to be a connection. We find that marking behavior and fighting with other male dogs both decrease a lot after the dog gets fixed. Similarly to what others have said, we've also seen that unneutered dogs are often a target for aggression from other males.

I guess my bottom line is what others have said here, without a health problem like prostate issues or whatever, it comes down to whether or not your dog is showing any of those problem behaviors and how good a job you can do with containment.
 

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Thanks for the link.

I'm mad, I just had my dog neutered a few days ago, he's 7 months and of course not yet done growing...I didn't know any of this info and I def. would have waited if I did!!!

I wonder why it is that the Vets are so persistent with neutering before 6 months of age? They asked me probably 3 times and sent me 2 letters in the mail to get him neutered before he was 6 months and even offered a discount...

When I get my GSD I'm waiting until she's mature. :mad:
 
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