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Hi all,

Getting my first GSD this summer! Looking forward to training him! As the title states, I'm curious to know how your experience as a new GSD owner has been like? The good and bad. ?
 

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Oh man I have never even had a dog before my 14 month old GSD is my first dog(got him at 7 weeks byb didn't know better) he is the perfect 1st dog for me. I think if I put it all in words I'd kill your thread idk if anyone would ever read it! Nothing bad but a journey for sure it has not come as natural to me as raising children. I will always be the cat person I am but even tho I still battle cat harrassement I love having a dog specifically a GSD. I plan for more! Add the above to living on 12 acres with no fence it has made me put in the time and effort to learn how to teach and get from the dog what I need to give him the freedom he deserves. I look forward to taking him camping our favorite thing to do and trust him off leash. Long lines are a pain but necessary .
Enjoy your puppy, enjoy the journey with your dog, do your best to be fair and teach have patience. Find the right people to confide in who can balance you when your patience or expectations maybe out of whack with your ability to teach.

Watch/read everything you can on motivational training, be clear have a plan, and be consistent with all choices you make. That may begin to cover what I've learned. Watch out they bite when they are little. Crates, lots of naps and redirection at the start.

Welcome to the forum.
 

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Find someone local you can talk to that really knows working dogs like GSDs. I've nearly always had dogs and I've had a GSD before. Our GSD pup was the first pup my hubby and I raised together and we ended up having all kinds of questions. It was good to have someone knowledgeable to tell us what was normal, what was foolish and laugh along with us at our mistakes and cheer our accomplishments.
 

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How exciting! I wish you both wonderful times together!

For my first GSD I learned a lot.

I learned that I sucked at training dogs and got better. I learned that feeling sorry for a rescue dog and trying to make up for lost time and spoiling him was a huge mistake. I learned that the foundation for any sort of relationship with any other being is founded in respect.

I also learned that these are the best dogs ever, that dogs could be so intuitive and intelligent, and that not much compares to having a GSD as your best friend and sidekick.

Yeah my post is lame, but there you go :D
 

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Realize that a healthy working dog is not the average pet dog that you can plant in the home. It requires a life style but what you get back is amazing, nothing like any dog I have ever had.
Line up a good trainer, go visit his/her training sessions before you have your pup. Hope you found a good breeder with good references. Prepare a bank account as they are not cheap in upkeep. Find a vet who is supportive about your decisions regarding health; vaccines (research vaccines!), feeding etc.
Puppies are not easy and are referred to as 'land sharks'. This forum is supportive and can help you once you have your little 'bundle of joy' but he shouldn't know how you feel about them.
Even though it is very early, research neutering vs. leaving him intact. It is good to have a plan far in advance so you can have a conversation with your vet.
Have fun with the prep.
Is there a website about this breeder?
 

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How exciting! I wish you both wonderful times together!

For my first GSD I learned a lot.

I learned that I sucked at training dogs and got better. I learned that feeling sorry for a rescue dog and trying to make up for lost time and spoiling him was a huge mistake. I learned that the foundation for any sort of relationship with any other being is founded in respect.

I also learned that these are the best dogs ever, that dogs could be so intuitive and intelligent, and that not much compares to having a GSD as your best friend and sidekick.

Yeah my post is lame, but there you go :D
Thanks for the honesty. Totally not lame. I think it's important to learn from prior experience to make better ones!

Oh man I have never even had a dog before my 14 month old GSD is my first dog(got him at 7 weeks byb didn't know better) he is the perfect 1st dog for me. I think if I put it all in words I'd kill your thread idk if anyone would ever read it! Nothing bad but a journey for sure it has not come as natural to me as raising children. I will always be the cat person I am but even tho I still battle cat harrassement I love having a dog specifically a GSD. I plan for more! Add the above to living on 12 acres with no fence it has made me put in the time and effort to learn how to teach and get from the dog what I need to give him the freedom he deserves. I look forward to taking him camping our favorite thing to do and trust him off leash. Long lines are a pain but necessary .
Enjoy your puppy, enjoy the journey with your dog, do your best to be fair and teach have patience. Find the right people to confide in who can balance you when your patience or expectations maybe out of whack with your ability to teach.

Watch/read everything you can on motivational training, be clear have a plan, and be consistent with all choices you make. That may begin to cover what I've learned. Watch out they bite when they are little. Crates, lots of naps and redirection at the start.

Welcome to the forum.
I appreciate that. That's why i started this thread. The more input the better. It helps newbies like me understand and look forward to training and bonding with future pup. I like to camp in the summer/fall time too and i can't wait for him to join us. Kind of jealous with the 12 acres of land you got, here in jersey you get very little for your buck lol. I haven't had a puppy in years, it will definitely be fun, especially after work where there are several parks in my area. I also, have two cats. One who has lived with dogs before and the other.. is a gamble. Not sure how she will react but i'll be sure to do introductions accordingly. If you have any recommendations, i'd love to hear it.

Realize that a healthy working dog is not the average pet dog that you can plant in the home. It requires a life style but what you get back is amazing, nothing like any dog I have ever had.
Line up a good trainer, go visit his/her training sessions before you have your pup. Hope you found a good breeder with good references. Prepare a bank account as they are not cheap in upkeep. Find a vet who is supportive about your decisions regarding health; vaccines (research vaccines!), feeding etc.
Puppies are not easy and are referred to as 'land sharks'. This forum is supportive and can help you once you have your little 'bundle of joy' but he shouldn't know how you feel about them.
Even though it is very early, research neutering vs. leaving him intact. It is good to have a plan far in advance so you can have a conversation with your vet.
Have fun with the prep.
Is there a website about this breeder?
This is exactly what I've read in the books and in this forum. My wife and i discussed this a year ago before stepping forward. We realize the work and accept it. We will be more active and this will definitely be a lifestyle change but we look forward to doing almost everything with our pup, from camping to hiking, to traveling.

Yes, i will be getting a Traumwolfen pup. Planned Litters. Spoke to several owners on the FB page and all had nothing but great things to say. She was recommended to me by Lee- Wolfstraum.

I have a trainer lined up for him here in NJ. Beth Bradley, as recommended by @CometDog. I plan on getting in contact with her once the pups are born and will be attending a class prior to getting my pup. She does train for Schutzhund but for now, i will be focused on obedience.

Still on the fence about neutering. Some places here are "not neutered? not allowed" especially down at the shore. I'll follow your advice and give a good read between the two.
 

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I have a trainer lined up for him here in NJ. Beth Bradley, as recommended by @CometDog. I plan on getting in contact with her once the pups are born and will be attending a class prior to getting my pup. She does train for Schutzhund but for now, i will be focused on obedience.

Still on the fence about neutering. Some places here are "not neutered? not allowed" especially down at the shore. I'll follow your advice and give a good read between the two.
You will like training with Beth. Tell her Sandy sent you :) If you are talking about Bark At The Park Yappy Hour in Asbury and places like that- personally I would not do mass playdates or anything like that anyway. I especially would not neuter for it. There are dog fights in crowds like that regardless of the state of the dogs. We just had a bad one here in Lyndhurst dog park which is usually pretty tame. It takes ONE dog ONE day, and now you have injuries, and possibly a traumatic experience that can affect future behavior.

Same goes for the "doggy daycare" places that require neutering. Dogs mingle too much with crowds of dogs, which is why they want them fixed. I personally would not leave my dog with anyone that wants them fixed thinking it will prevent dog fights and whoops litters. Supervision is what prevents dog fights, and not having a romper room environment for dogs that are not human children. It is a modern social construct.

If you need any of those outlets or day time care, ask Beth she will recommend good places. Good luck, looking forward to seeing pics!
 

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It's been a long time since my first, we got Sneaker back in 1986. In retrospect she was a very easy dog......except for the chewing. Be prepared for that. She particularly liked newspapers, cardboard boxes, garden hoses, and the plastic pots that plants come in. We had just bought our first home and gotten married, so we were doing some work on the yard. I think she outgrew it by around a year and a half old, lol.

Our second GSD was actually much more difficult. Sneaker lived to 14-1/2 years old, and what little I'd needed to learn about dog training was long since forgotten by the time we got Cassidy in 2000. She was a crash course in training and behavior, with numerous issues including severe leash reactivity.

It sounds like you've got a good training resource so I would only suggest that you get help before you think you need it. Set your puppy up with a good foundation, put the work in early, and you should be fine. Too many people let things go until they have problems to solve rather than raising a puppy proactively, to prevent issues from cropping up in the first place. I like the NILIF program: Nothing in Life is Free It can be modified for use with a young puppy, and adjusted as necessary as he grows and matures. Mostly it ends up being simply our house rules, part of their every day life. I'm also a big fan of working on default behaviors, especially eye contact. The more you can reinforce focus, the better. Your puppy won't learn anything unless he's paying attention to you, so that's really important foundation training, IMO.
 

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I'd been wanting a dog since 2009 or so, since my husband and I got our 1st home. After much arguing, much planning, much deliberation, and at least two years of research on my part, fate intervened and we were offered a free puppy from a neighbors' litter.

That's how we got Boon. He's a melanistic black-and-tan, I think, no papers, might be from working lines but who knows. He is my "put research into practice" pup, the one who is also my trainer. One of my favorite parts of having him is watching as my skeptical husband falls completely in love with this furry, bitey thing. I like acknowledging how this dog and we people influence one anothers' behavior.

I have enjoyed instilling confidence in Boon, encouraging him to check things out if he's nervous or unsure about them. I've enjoyed testing his abilities, attempting, for example to see if he can demonstrate understanding between the meaning of a general word ("toy") and then more specific words ("ball", "frisbee"), and being delighted to find that he seems very able to do that.

I've gotten a lot of great advice from this forum and from a lot of different videos, books, etc., but one of the most valuable has been to crate train and otherwise constantly supervise the pup so that he CAN'T make mistakes. This has prevented so much frustration on our part and the pup's part! I was very surprised when my husband said to me (weeks after we got Boon) "I am amazed that this pup has been so good and not made poops all over the house!" Of course I looked at my spouse in astonishment and said "That's why we are doing the crate training!" I guess when he was a kid and had puppies, his dad managed things some other way, apparently not as effectively, and I'm glad we have the benefit of others' wisdom now.

Also don't forget that you have a puppy. He'll be a puppy for at least a year, probably more. Enjoy it. Take lots of pictures. Enjoy how easy he is to manage when he's small and train him so that he's as easy to manage when he's big. Play. Play some more. Enjoy his uniqueness and enjoy the way he changes you.
 
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