German Shepherds Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am looking to for a male GS puppy to adopt. I would prefer a puppy, but am fine with a young male if temperament and other factors are known. I don't really care if he is purebred or not. I am not looking for a working dog, just a companion. Coat color doesn't really matter either, though I would prefer coloring that is normal to a GS. The only thing besides age and gender that I truly desire is erect ears. Though, I will not let ears stop me from adopting the right dog. All that being said, I do prefer a dog that is still in tact.

I have been looking for months on Petfinder, Adoptapet, craiglist, etc etc for the right dog for me, but so far no such luck. Many backyard breeders, but that is all I am really finding. I don't mind going through a professional breeder, but I feel there are far too many dogs in need of a home.

I am well experienced in large dog breeds, and have always taken the best care of my dogs. Again, I am not looking for a working dog for sport, just a pet/companion.

I do not mind travelling if enough info and the like is exchanged.

So, if you are looking for a good home, I am the right person. Any info or leads are welcome as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,366 Posts
I would suggest contacting a rescue and working thru them. This section of the forum is to list dogs in need that are in shelters. Not to advertise for a dog.


FYI - coat colors "normal" to a GSD = sable, bicolor, black, black and tan, white.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I would suggest contacting a rescue and working thru them. This section of the forum is to list dogs in need that are in shelters. Not to advertise for a dog.


FYI - coat colors "normal" to a GSD = sable, bicolor, black, black and tan, white.

I figured you could post looking for a dog as well on here. I have seen more than a few post asking the same. And I have looked at rescues, but they all get the dog fixed. And for health reason, I find fixing a dog before the age of 2 is wrong. Most do even before the age of 1.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,366 Posts
They aren't supposed to be posting in this section either advertising for a dog.

All rescues and shelters require the dog to be spayed and neutered. Your post looking for an intact dog raises a red flag, regardless of your reason stated, so I would hope anyone on there would also require a background check, home visit and that the dog be fixed. If you want control over this, then you should buy from a good breeder.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Yea, that is another reason I wanted to stay away from a rescue. They want way too much info that is none of their business. Not sure how wanting to keep a dog healthier by not having it fixed at under a year old is red flag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,366 Posts
But it IS their business. I've been on that end of rescue. It absolutely is their business. When I pull a dog from certain death, vet that dog, spend time to figure out that dog's personality to find them just the right home....whether or not you are a nut looking for a dog to throw in a fighting pit or a good home is absolutely 100% my business. I've done home checks, I've done reference checks. There is nothing about them that is invasive. I've met wonderful people, had great chats over coffee, and they easily got their dog from the rescue.

If you can't see how signing up on a forum, and your first post is for an intact, young, dog is potential red flag that deserves to be questioned, that in itself is an issue as well. This is all about keeping the dogs safe and in good homes.

If you don't want to share that info, have references checked, then you should buy from a breeder. I think most people have enough information in this thread to make their own decisions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
867 Posts
But it IS their business. I've been on that end of rescue. It absolutely is their business. When I pull a dog from certain death, vet that dog, spend time to figure out that dog's personality to find them just the right home....whether or not you are a nut looking for a dog to throw in a fighting pit or a good home is absolutely 100% my business. I've done home checks, I've done reference checks. There is nothing about them that is invasive. I've met wonderful people, had great chats over coffee, and they easily got their dog from the rescue.

If you can't see how signing up on a forum, and your first post is for an intact, young, dog is potential red flag that deserves to be questioned, that in itself is an issue as well. This is all about keeping the dogs safe and in good homes.

If you don't want to share that info, have references checked, then you should buy from a breeder. I think most people have enough information in this thread to make their own decisions.
Agree ^^^^ Very well stated....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
What a load of nonsense. An issue because I want a male dog that is intact? Male dogs who are fixed before 2 years of age don't tend to grow as they should, not mention it doesn't seem the best for them bone wise.

I assume you think I am looking for a male dog to breed or whatever. Guess you failed to see where I said I couldn't care less about if it is purebred, its coat color, or other things. Simply looking for a dog. End of. You seem invested in this in an emotional way to which I don't understand.

"If you can't see how signing up on a forum, and your first post is for an intact, young, dog is potential red flag that deserves to be questioned, that in itself is an issue as well. "

Take your implied accusations elsewhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
If you have good intentions for a rescue dog, you are just going to have to share personal information with the rescue people. That's just how it works, it's not personal, it's just essential standard practice. Do you have issues that might prevent them from wanting to adopt a dog to you? Do you live in a stable home, with a yard that is fenced or what are your circumstances? You should try to look at it from the perspective from the rescue people, they have taken in a dog with the promise that they will do their best to never let it come to harm again and / or with the intention of finding it a suitable forever home, so they need to be able to verify who is adopting and what their circumstances are.

I agree that rescues can seem restrictive initially, but, if you are earnest and work with them (rather than refusing to share important information), and even if your circumstances aren't the best, you might be able to work something out!

Also, you might have to give up the idea of having an intact dog, it's not everything, it's just standard procedure with rescues so I wouldn't try and fight it. The longest lived German Shepherd I ever knew was a large intact male (neutered as a very young puppy). Neutered males still need a good home, if you really care about that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,366 Posts
In your anger, you have totally missed my point. I'm not the one looking for a dog and both mine came from top notch breeders. People say whatever they need to in order to get what they want. Thus the reason people need to do checks and rescues ask questions.

How defensive you became and how quickly you chose to attack me instead of just reading my explanations of why your post would raise red flags and why rescues ask those questions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
If you have good intentions for a rescue dog, you are just going to have to share personal information with the rescue people. That's just how it works, it's not personal, it's just essential standard practice. Do you have issues that might prevent them from wanting to adopt a dog to you? Do you live in a stable home, with a yard that is fenced or what are your circumstances? You should try to look at it from the perspective from the rescue people, they have taken in a dog with the promise that they will do their best to never let it come to harm again and / or with the intention of finding it a suitable forever home, so they need to be able to verify who is adopting and what their circumstances are.

I agree that rescues can seem restrictive initially, but, if you are earnest and work with them (rather than refusing to share important information), and even if your circumstances aren't the best, you might be able to work something out!

Also, you might have to give up the idea of having an intact dog, it's not everything, it's just standard procedure with rescues so I wouldn't try and fight it. The longest lived German Shepherd I ever knew was a large intact male (neutered as a very young puppy). Neutered males still need a good home, if you really care about that.
I just don't trust the few rescues I have seen around here. They seem to just go from shelter to shelter and get their hands on any GS or GS mix, and then ask $400 to $500 for their efforts. My circumstances are ideal for a dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,366 Posts
? I didn't imply anything in any previous post. But I will state your entitled reaction certainly IS a suspicious red flag. Big. Red. Flag.

Bottom line - people need to check anyone out before letting anyone "adopt" a dog. Just keepin' it real.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
218 Posts
I just don't trust the few rescues I have seen around here. They seem to just go from shelter to shelter and get their hands on any GS or GS mix, and then ask $400 to $500 for their efforts. My circumstances are ideal for a dog.
I think that is a little short sighted. The amount of time, energy and expense (food, vet fees and medical treatments, accommodation, gas etc.) in pulling dogs from shelters can be huge. Not to mention then looking after them for potentially months (or years!). The average rescue dog is not adopted in just a few days. Most reputable rescues work really hard to establish the temperament of the dog so it can be matched to a suitable adopter, and conversely spend much of their own time finding and vetting potential adopters. I don't always agree with the practices of every rescue, however, their work really deserves appreciation for what they do for dogs in general!! I think $400 dollars fee for a rescue dog (to help cover their costs) is about standard, and that would be entirely without profit or pay for most if not all of the people involved in the rescue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I think that is a little short sighted. The amount of time, energy and expense (food, vet fees and medical treatments, accommodation, gas etc.) in pulling dogs from shelters can be huge. Not to mention then looking after them for potentially months (or years!). The average rescue dog is not adopted in just a few days. Most reputable rescues work really hard to establish the temperament of the dog so it can be matched to a suitable adopter, and conversely spend much of their own time finding and vetting potential adopters. I don't always agree with the practices of every rescue, however, their work really deserves appreciation for what they do for dogs in general!! I think $400 dollars fee for a rescue dog (to help cover their costs) is about standard, and that would be entirely without profit or pay for most if not all of the people involved in the rescue.
I have no problem paying the money. All of my other dogs were purebred and bought them from fine breeders. I just think many of the rescue people are not on the up and up. I get a flipper vibe from them. Flippers are just as bad as backyard breeders.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
975 Posts
Except the latest one (Rachel) whom I happened upon at a local shelter, ALL of my dogs as an adult have come from responsible, ethical breeders. For decades. Until I became a known quantity to them (via participation on a listserv, going to shows, specialties, etc), every.single.breeder I contacted (whether I ended up buying a puppy from them or not) engaged in virtually the same screening process that reputable rescues do (e.g., in-person/phone interview and/or questionnaire [which was followed up by a separate phone call], home visits, reference checks, etc).

I never found the process (or the questions) troublesome or insulting. Why? Because it was manifestly apparent that the breeders valued the lives that they'd created and wanted to ensure that those pups would enjoy a good quality of life with me. Reputable rescue groups feel the same way. After all, there's not much joy in seeing an adopted dog/puppy returned to the group (multiple times in some cases) because it was a "poor fit," developed/showed "behavioral issues" or whatever the truth might actually be. Because I share those values, I've never objected to the process.

I think anyone approaching a breeder or rescue group for a puppy/adult, should FIRST spend some time answering some hard questions: Why do I want a puppy/adult? What do I plan to do with it, show, sport, various activities? Why do I want this breed in particular and how well will this breed fit in with my plans? How much do I know about raising/training this breed or any breed of dog for that matter? How well would said puppy/adult fit my current lifestyle? If it doesn't fit well, how much am I willing to change? If I am willing, do I have the resources (financial and otherwise) to adapt to what the puppy/dog needs? There are clmany more questions that I think one should ask oneself before approaching a breeder/rescue group, but these are some to get started with.

A final point. I've never succeeded in obtaining something I wanted from someone if I lapsed into bullying and/or evasive behavior. YMMV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I have no problem paying the money. All of my other dogs were purebred and bought them from fine breeders. I just think many of the rescue people are not on the up and up. I get a
Except the latest one (Rachel) whom I happened upon at a local shelter, ALL of my dogs as an adult have come from responsible, ethical breeders. For decades. Until I became a known quantity to them (via participation on a listserv, going to shows, specialties, etc), every.single.breeder I contacted (whether I ended up buying a puppy from them or not) engaged in virtually the same screening process that reputable rescues do (e.g., in-person/phone interview and/or questionnaire [which was followed up by a separate phone call], home visits, reference checks, etc).

I never found the process (or the questions) troublesome or insulting. Why? Because it was manifestly apparent that the breeders valued the lives that they'd created and wanted to ensure that those pups would enjoy a good quality of life with me. Reputable rescue groups feel the same way. After all, there's not much joy in seeing an adopted dog/puppy returned to the group (multiple times in some cases) because it was a "poor fit," developed/showed "behavioral issues" or whatever the truth might actually be. Because I share those values, I've never objected to the process.

I think anyone approaching a breeder or rescue group for a puppy/adult, should FIRST spend some time answering some hard questions: Why do I want a puppy/adult? What do I plan to do with it, show, sport, various activities? Why do I want this breed in particular and how well will this breed fit in with my plans? How much do I know about raising/training this breed or any breed of dog for that matter? How well would said puppy/adult fit my current lifestyle? If it doesn't fit well, how much am I willing to change? If I am willing, do I have the resources (financial and otherwise) to adapt to what the puppy/dog needs? There are clmany more questions that I think one should ask oneself before approaching a breeder/rescue group, but these are some to get started with.

A final point. I've never succeeded in obtaining something I wanted from someone if I lapsed into bullying and/or evasive behavior. YMMV.
"..bullying and/or evasive behavior. YMMV."

This post hasn't gone as intended, so it doesn't really mater at this point, but please show me where I did anything along those lines.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
867 Posts
I have no problem paying the money. All of my other dogs were purebred and bought them from fine breeders. I just think many of the rescue people are not on the up and up. I get a flipper vibe from them. Flippers are just as bad as backyard breeders.
Well I'd say you've already got the answer to your problem...since you're clearly not having any luck with rescues and you want a dog colored like a GSD with ears that stand up....you said " I have no problem paying the money"....then contact some breeders--tell them what you want--pay the money...keep the dog intact as long as you want....problem solved
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Well I'd say you've already got the answer to your problem...since you're clearly not having any luck with rescues and you want a dog colored like a GSD with ears that stand up....you said " I have no problem paying the money"....then contact some breeders--tell them what you want--pay the money...keep the dog intact as long as you want....problem solved
I for sure got my answer.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top