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I am truly amazed at the speed of learning of these young pups. Griff is only 10 weeks old and with me since Saturday. I am working with him throughout the day. It basically is a daytime job but I have committed to this for the next few weeks; a luxury I know. Deja also needs her exercise and fun with me so when pup is sleeping in his crate, it is her turn. Today I took him to an outdoor cafe; rug, bully stick, clicker and his kibble for treats; ohs and ahs from people galore and he handled it very well. 3 full days of frequent short sessions are already paying off. He also learned to lie down when I am in the kitchen since food magically drops from the sky when he lies down. No accidents yet either since coming home here and quiet throughout the night because he is busy learning in the day about daily life situations and behavior but is allowed a few play sessions with Deja.
I wonder if he is so easy to house train because he was raised outside and has never learned that peeing and pooping in house was even an option?
I am writing this as an illustration how important it is to train them so quickly before they weigh 80 pounds and while their brains are sponges. Bonus: Deja takes care of the landshark behavior!!
 

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I find a balance between mild early training and letting them be a dog works best. I did a lot of early training with my 2 yr old and regretted it later. My next one will get maybe 5 minutes a day of early training, spread out a minute or so at a time, but a lot of off leash running around.
I agree. He surely doesn't lack time of just fun. I am not drilling him :wink2:
 

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Does Deja hang out with him most of the day or do you keep him separate? Always wonder how people do it with two dogs lol. I have to agree they learn so much quicker when they're young!! We taught Gandalf when we brought him home to wait at the door before going out. Love it now when I open the garage door and put on my boots he waits for me to finish up and give him the okay.
 

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It's good to hear that you're relaxing and enjoying this puppy.He's benefiting from all of your successes and mistakes over the years.Deja sounds like a great help also:)
I never made a big deal out of keeping new puppies separate either.I suppose it would be different if puppy became too dependent on the older dog...but never had that happen.Enjoy!
 

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I am truly amazed at the speed of learning of these young pups. Griff is only 10 weeks old and with me since Saturday. I am working with him throughout the day. It basically is a daytime job but I have committed to this for the next few weeks; a luxury I know. Deja also needs her exercise and fun with me so when pup is sleeping in his crate, it is her turn. Today I took him to an outdoor cafe; rug, bully stick, clicker and his kibble for treats; ohs and ahs from people galore and he handled it very well. 3 full days of frequent short sessions are already paying off. He also learned to lie down when I am in the kitchen since food magically drops from the sky when he lies down. No accidents yet either since coming home here and quiet throughout the night because he is busy learning in the day about daily life situations and behavior but is allowed a few play sessions with Deja.
I wonder if he is so easy to house train because he was raised outside and has never learned that peeing and pooping in house was even an option?
I am writing this as an illustration how important it is to train them so quickly before they weigh 80 pounds and while their brains are sponges. Bonus: Deja takes care of the landshark behavior!!
I think you might be onto something here. Inga was raised outside too. She only peed once in the house twice and that was it. Of course we managed her eat, rest and crate time like clockwork.
 

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" I wonder if he is so easy to house train because he was raised outside and has never learned that peeing and pooping in house was even an option?"

I'm offering up more anecdotal evidence to your thoughts. My boy was also raised outside. Neither dh or I can recall any accidents in the house. My son just adopted a rescue pup. He was raised in a foster home where there were other dogs and a doggy dog to go in and out at will. My son does not have a doggy door but it took less than a week for the pup to train my son to let him out when he sat at the door.

Griff sound like a really fun pup.
 

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I am truly amazed at the speed of learning of these young pups. Griff is only 10 weeks old and with me since Saturday. I am working with him throughout the day. It basically is a daytime job but I have committed to this for the next few weeks; a luxury I know. Deja also needs her exercise and fun with me so when pup is sleeping in his crate, it is her turn. Today I took him to an outdoor cafe; rug, bully stick, clicker and his kibble for treats; ohs and ahs from people galore and he handled it very well. 3 full days of frequent short sessions are already paying off. He also learned to lie down when I am in the kitchen since food magically drops from the sky when he lies down. No accidents yet either since coming home here and quiet throughout the night because he is busy learning in the day about daily life situations and behavior but is allowed a few play sessions with Deja.
I wonder if he is so easy to house train because he was raised outside and has never learned that peeing and pooping in house was even an option?
I am writing this as an illustration how important it is to train them so quickly before they weigh 80 pounds and while their brains are sponges. Bonus: Deja takes care of the landshark behavior!!
I envy you having Deja for the landsharking!
 

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Does Deja hang out with him most of the day or do you keep him separate? Always wonder how people do it with two dogs lol. I have to agree they learn so much quicker when they're young!! We taught Gandalf when we brought him home to wait at the door before going out. Love it now when I open the garage door and put on my boots he waits for me to finish up and give him the okay.
Kinda half/half. She is not with him when I take him places as I want him to stand on his own feet. He is crated inside when I work with her outside.
He truly is a joy and so funny with all his clever tactics to outsmart her (they always backfire!). I am si glad to have two dogs again.
 

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I find a balance between mild early training and letting them be a dog works best. I did a lot of early training with my 2 yr old and regretted it later. My next one will get maybe 5 minutes a day of early training, spread out a minute or so at a time, but a lot of off leash running around.
Why did you regret it later?
 

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It depends what you consider 'training'. What I mean by 'training' is learning to: sit by the door and not rush me, waiting by the door when I open it for visitors, sit for food, lie down when I am cooking, which makes treats fall from the sky, walking on leash, recall, not eating power cords, off button in crate etc. Oh....and house training! And all this at puppy level. I never regretted it and always had dogs that were easy to take along everywhere.
I am curious what you (LuvShepherds) mean by 'running around'? I see this term often on CL when they need a home where the dog can 'run around'.
 

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Why did you regret it later?
He was starting to show some anxiety around training and did not settle down in obedience class. There were other reasons, it’s complicated, but intensity had a part. I ended up dropping out of class and working with a private trainer who said to go back to a relaxed schedule, no more than 10 minutes at a time and no stress, no pressure. Too much too early sucks all the fun out of it for them. I have a high drive with some Czech and the trainer had me work him in drive some of the time because he loves toys and is very playful. Now, my training is serious but mixed in with fun play type training. He is over 2 now.
 

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He was starting to show some anxiety around training and did not settle down in obedience class. There were other reasons, it’s complicated, but intensity had a part. I ended up dropping out of class and working with a private trainer who said to go back to a relaxed schedule, no more than 10 minutes at a time and no stress, no pressure. Too much too early sucks all the fun out of it for them. I have a high drive with some Czech and the trainer had me work him in drive some of the time because he loves toys and is very playful. Now, my training is serious but mixed in with fun play type training. He is over 2 now.
Yes, the bolded, the dog can come to view you as the fun police and not the one where all good things come from but the one that takes the fun away.

I do agree on teaching manners and some shaping and luring but a minute here or there is plenty unless one is headed for competition.
 

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I am of the opinion that's pups should learn manners and a few basics for the first 6 months to a year, but that is me and what works for me might not work for others.
I am convinced that working pups too young dampens personality and desire to please. I felt the same way about the horses and often let my own go to 3-5 years before any serious training started.
I guess it depends on what you expect from a dog, and what your plans are.
 

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Mine learn manners first. Sit, Down and recall are all part of manners and being pleasant to live with in the house.

We can’t forget these puppies are babies and if we work them hard, they will want to avoid us. If we make ourselves the most fun thing ever, they will run to us.

Preparing for trialing is hard work, and the dogs are no longer young puppies, so I have no problem putting in more time. I put my older dog through a year of obedience and when we trialed, I worked her for hours. She seemed to like it but after she was done, she did not want to go back. Sometimes less is more and more is too much.
 

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If your puppy is happy and enthusiastic with you, you're fine.
Absolutely! And when your puppy isn't happy and enthusiastic and you continue anyway it's not the age of the puppy that's the problem...
 

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Even when training for competition you need to keep things fun and not overdo it, especially the few day before a trial to keep the dog 'fresh'. You can tell at the obedience trials which dogs are grilled and which ones have a more relaxed owner. None of my dogs, no matter the breeds, enjoyed formal obedience drilling, longer than a few minutes so I don't. And it is completely useless with sight hounds. But after all, I think it depends on the individual dog how far you go.
 
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