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I posted a question on it a week or so ago and didnt get much of a reply except for a link to a school that runs the test.
 

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DID YOU!?!? I must have missed that. Love
the thyroid.
Or maybe I just posted the Michigan site...that could be.

OFA Thyroid: http://www.offa.org/thyinfo.html

Dr. Dodd's thyroid article: http://www.itsfortheanimals.com/DODDS-CANINE-AI-THYROID.HTM
She also does the testing...

Michigan State:
http://www.animalhealth.msu.edu/

General Articles:
http://www.thepetcenter.com/gen/hypot.html
http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body_hypothyroidism.html
http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?cls=2&articleid=449

Nina when her thyroid suddenly seemed to stop working-no black spots or patches of missing fur, just overall loss of fur and the tail! GONE!


Now she's back to this:


Just to show an example that is not necessarily what you think of when you think of thyroid.
Or maybe it is!
 

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Lazer's appointment was today and the vet actually DID recommend the FULL panel and sent it to MI State. I knew my friend had an appointment with the vet the caused me so much grief over Phoenix and his diagnosis so I wanted her to be prepared. Vet is also about 90% certain it is his thyroid causing the weight and temperament changes.
 

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The Dr. Dodds link I think is the one I was thinking of but could not find for some reason. Thanks!
 

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Originally Posted By: AmaruqLazer's appointment was today and the vet actually DID recommend the FULL panel and sent it to MI State.
For what it's worth. In people they will run the full panel as well to disseminate the extent of the disease. It could be that the thyroid isn't functioning at all, could be lack of iodine in the diet (which is necessary for the thyroid hormones to function properly), could also be a tumor of the gland. Treatment will depend on the reason for the lack of thyroid hormone circulating in the body.

My guy has hypothyroidism and the only presenting symptom he had, was significant hair loss.
 

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Lazer hasnt lost any hair but he is round (not flubbery fat but ROUND) and he has been escalating in some random aggression. He was also badly abused before she got him and we know of some serious head trauma he experienced in his past.
 

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Our Rottie (now deceased) was classic hypothyroid when he was diagnosed - low energy, got cold easily, gained weight, though his coat wasn't terrible. But Grace is also hypothyroid and her case hasn't been typical - before she started meds we saw the sharper temperament but she experienced weight loss, not gain, frenetic behavior not lethergy, and while her coat was brittle and dull, it was still pretty thick and she didn't ever develop the classic ratty tail.

I'm glad to see this thread. Seems like thyroid problems are pretty common as dogs get older and the symptoms of many animals seem to deviate from the "normal" hypothyroid profile.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Indy was "old thyroid" when she was diagnosed. About 10 years old (mixed breed), thyroid levels decreasing. Kelp helped, but not enough, so I put her on the meds.

Max (GSD) was completely opposite. Young. Low-normal free T4, and low free T3, and elevated antibody levels (TGAA). The vet wouldn't treat because he said Max "didn't look hypothyroid". I had to change vets because of that. The vet we go to now, we were the first ones that she treated without being comletely out of range, and she was very pleased with his response. His coat changed, his personality change.

It's important to get that full panel with the Free T4 and the Free T3, and the TgAA, which is the best way to determine autoimmune thyroiditis.
 
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