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I have seen the term "throwing strength/power" as it applies to a breeding.

I'd like to learn what it actually means. Say throwing power 4 to1 or 2 to1 for example?

I am guessing this applies to how well the male will reproduce himself?? OR......??

TIA
 

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Yes, I would assume that is also what the breeder means. The dog or bitch tends to produce their power or strength in a specific drive (most people seem to concentrate mostly on protection). I have never seen it with numbers, though.
 

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Horse people talk about a stud 'stamping his get' meaning pretty much the same thing. But I think it's ridiculous to attach numbers to something like this. The dam provides 50% of the genes, and the number of genes contributed by a prepotent sire decreases with each generation, so that a sire that's 3 generations back only contributes 6% of the genes.

Still, some sires DO seem to have an effect on the progeny, even when they are a number of generations back in the lineage.
 

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But what about how the dam's temperament and how she rears her pups? If she shows fearful behavior so likely will the pups. Perhaps this is genetics but also could be learned. If someone took baby pups from a fearful dam and had them raised by a strong nerved dam, this would be a good experiment to see the influence of nature vs nurture. In mares, the dominant mare in the herd, her fillies likely grow up to be dominant mares. Nature or nurture?
 

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@Nurse Bishop, it has been done and genetics matter. Weak females can produce strong pups just like strong females can produce weak pups. The pups out of the fearful female might be less fearful of certain things if raised by a strong female, but the underlying genetic weakness would still show up. Only time this might make a difference is a female that is afraid due to past trauma (though how would one know) and her pups raised by another female.


I have seen pups raised by another female thrive due to the better mothering abilities and availability of milk than from a mother that was poor in both. The pups lived, but they were never as good as their littermates. The pups raised by the good mother, though, were never as good as her own pups. Genetics matter.



This is off topic for this thread. :)
 
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