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Not sure if this is the right section, just wanting to know what people’s thoughts are on allowing dogs to sort them selves out in a pack and setting a hierarchy, Ive seen videos of Brandon fouche and others letting dogs bite each other so they can communicate, what would be the opposing view of this type of socialization.
First thing I would do is correct the dogs or separate in fear of actual dog fight. So I’m curious what others think
 

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My feeling is that the approach is deceptive and does a disservice to new dog owners.

Inexperienced owners see what looks like Ceaser and Fouche tossing a random dog into a pack of vicious dogs.... and everything works out. So they try it at the dog local dog park and things go horribly wrong.

Behind the scenes:
The handlers have a very good understanding of their pack. They know how each dog is going to handle different situations.
The members of the pack are usually very well socialized. They know how to handle letting new, sometimes unruly, dogs into their pack.
During the day of shooting, any unruly dogs are left in the kennel.
The handlers are very experienced working with aggressive dogs.
Finally, problems are edited out.

In my mind, this fits into the category of don't try this at home.

On the other hand, one of the advantages of a board and train program is that the trainer spends time preparing the new dog to meet their dogs. In carefully controlled environments, they introduce the new dog to their pack. After the introduction has been done, the new dog has hours to learn to work and play in the presence of other dogs.

As a single dog owner with a full-time job, it would take me months to get that volume of positive interactions with other dogs.
 

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The only show I've watched that puts problem dogs with the trainer's dogs and lets them "sort it out" to a degree and actually emphatically says "Don't try this at home. I know my dogs very well and assess each one carefully" was Zen Dog. And it's true. He makes careful points constantly throughout the show about why he's picked a specific dog to interact with the client's dog and what he thinks will happen.
 

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My two dogs are a 5 y/o intact GSD and a 2 y/o lab. My lab is not exactly submissive but he really wants no trouble. I don't know if it could ever exist in him to defend himself. At least it has not yet.

Here is an example. My shepherd will grab him by the neck, put his whole neck in his mouth. He is just playing. But the lab doesn't really like it and will look at me for help. He just literally looks over at me from his brother's jaws. And I tell the shepherd to quit it, and he does.

How fair would it be to leave my sweet little non quarrelsome lab to fend for himself amongst the wolves?

I've had a fair number of dogs who were not so evenly matched, or one tended to be a bully, and so I make the rules as to how they treat each other.

When dogs are mismatched in breed traits, size, age, strength, temperament...and we put them together in an enclosed space where both must live, I think it is on us to make that peaceful and easy for all.

On the other hand there is a time and a place where communication from one dog to another is way more useful to them than from me. I try to find appropriate dogs for mine as adolescents, dogs who will give them good feedback esp about obnoxious adolescent behavior. I choose dogs who are effective, fair and safe to do that and I think it is valuable to them.
 

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My feeling is that the approach is deceptive and does a disservice to new dog owners.

Inexperienced owners see what looks like Ceaser and Fouche tossing a random dog into a pack of vicious dogs.... and everything works out. So they try it at the dog local dog park and things go horribly wrong.

Behind the scenes:
The handlers have a very good understanding of their pack. They know how each dog is going to handle different situations.
The members of the pack are usually very well socialized. They know how to handle letting new, sometimes unruly, dogs into their pack.
During the day of shooting, any unruly dogs are left in the kennel.
The handlers are very experienced working with aggressive dogs.
Finally, problems are edited out.

In my mind, this fits into the category of don't try this at home.

On the other hand, one of the advantages of a board and train program is that the trainer spends time preparing the new dog to meet their dogs. In carefully controlled environments, they introduce the new dog to their pack. After the introduction has been done, the new dog has hours to learn to work and play in the presence of other dogs.

As a single dog owner with a full-time job, it would take me months to get that volume of positive interactions with other dogs.
Really agree with this. I am lucky because I board dogs so I have a decent volume of other people's dogs all the time. Many I know well and have for years, so when I am bringing up a young dog I can choose who to put them with that will work well. Not really useful in the advice section since 90% of people dont just have a pool of dogs at their fingertips thst they know that well to choose from.

But, I do think there are more and more boarding and daycare places getting better and structured dog interactions and not just letting it be a free for all so these places do exist for people to possibly put their dogs in boarding or daycare for a more constructive dog-dog interaction.
 

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This is a "know thy dog" thing.
Sabi was the ultimate Nanny Dog. I absolutely trusted her judgement and had no issues with allowing her to make those decisions. Bud was awesome with other dogs, right up until he wasn't. I would never have allowed him to make those decisions.
I think it is really dangerous for a novice dog owner to allow this behavior. It could easily open a door that can never be closed.
A dog with weak nerves that gets roughed up by another dog could have lifelong issues, an aggressive bully of a dog could escalate things to a fight.
In general I believe that dogs should sort things out amongst themselves, but the humans involved must know what they are seeing.
Dog training shows give people a sunshine and roses view of dog behavior. That's dangerous.
 

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I allow them to settle their differences to a point. If one is just being a bully then they answer to me. Two females? No. I'll settle that before it begins.
 

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But, I do think there are more and more boarding and daycare places getting better and structured dog interactions and not just letting it be a free for all so these places do exist for people to possibly put their dogs in boarding or daycare for a more constructive dog-dog interaction.
Yes, It looks like the industry is getting better. You can still get the cheap daycare where they throw a bunch of dogs in a room and let them keep thems busy. Or for a few more dollars you can find some much better place which put in the effort to keep the dogs physically and mentally stimulated.

My goal is to get Ole to the point where he can attend normal dog training classes. Then he and I can work in close proximity to other dogs without things turning into a free for all

I allow them to settle their differences to a point.
:) I would have to say that you lean towards the experienced end of things from a handler perspective.
1. You know your dogs.
2. You know 'the point' where you need to step in.
3. You know how to effectively step in and take charge when necessary.
 

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I came across this video by Tyler Muto

None of the drama and all of the calm, level-headed, control I would expect from a good trainer introducing a new dog to an existing pack.
 
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