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As for cloning my family--- well, I like my siblings but my parents should not have ever been allowed on the earth. SO sure, clone some family members and not others...
 

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I know we aren't supposed to anthropomorphize animals, but we consider them family. Would you clone a parent, a spouse, a sibling, a child? Ew. Dogs are different because we cannot think in canine. But thinking in human, what would a cloned person think of us? Ok, dogs aren't going to think of that. But it is still beyond yuck. It is like sacrilegious. We have one chance with a critter. We don't get to do it over again. I love my critters, but I wouldn't bring them back from the dead or try to duplicate them.
A few of my siblings, I definitely wouldn't clone.
 

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I wonder if in theory it might improve the chances to have not just an identically looking dog but a dog with a very similar personality if you do it when your current dog is still young and it can influence the upbringing of its clone?
 

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I wonder if in theory it might improve the chances to have not just an identically looking dog but a dog with a very similar personality if you do it when your current dog is still young and it can influence the upbringing of its clone?
No. I wouldn't. 50k is too much money to try to play God with. If we want to play God, we should take that 50K and adopt a child that would otherwise have an awful life, or fund a soup kitchen, or fund a scholarship for victims of crime, or clean up a neighborhood, or set up apartments for a year for several homeless servicemen, or fund a campaign against or to improve the lives of animals kept in laboratories, or to help 10 families displaced by hurricanes or forest fires. I don't think there should be a cap on what amount of money people should earn, but there is something about gluttony, which in my opinion is to take resources and to consume them so wastefully without regard to the needs of people around us.

Someone can purchase a dog for 50k, and if they were doing it to establish a line of dogs, buying a champion or a specially trained dog for police work or seeing eye, or siezure/heart/glucose monitoring -- that I wouldn't have an issue with. Spending that kind of money to assure your next dog is the same in looks and hopefully in temperament of a previous dog, it's obscene to me. But then my house only cost 29k, and I still have a couple of years to pay on it, so 50k is a lot of money to me. If the cost was 5k, then I wouldn't do it, but I wouldn't be as set against it for other people.
 

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I wonder if in theory it might improve the chances to have not just an identically looking dog but a dog with a very similar personality if you do it when your current dog is still young and it can influence the upbringing of its clone?
Wouldn’t the addition of a second dog potentially change what both may end up like? Also if the first is still young, you’d possibly never really know what the first was like in the fullness of its life? This is an interesting question you raise. This is why I have an uneasiness about cloning in general unless it’s say specific anatomical parts such as muscle tissue or organs that are essentially inanimate. The spectrum for experimentation increases exponentially once you clone whole living organisms. While I’m absolutely behind science, I feel cloning animals opens the door to attempts to clone humans once the technique is perfected and I’m absolutely against that ethically. Really the only purpose I can see in animal cloning might be to save endangered species but even then you’re using a limited gene pool and potentially perpetuating genetic flaws. Or you have to start fiddling with genetic sequencing, which raises other issues. Would you clone your dog but have hip dysplasia corrected through genetic manipulation if it were possible? This has been an extremely interesting and thought provoking thread.
 

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The concept is more wild and fun to flirt. I don’t see it so painful to me as knowing our physical form -our dna always goes back to the earth in the end. Our souls leave this place, although will visit, but can never be duplicated. Clones are not identical.

My nephews are identical twins and my cousins are identical twins. Identical twins have the same dna as each other. They are what you would consider natural clones both complete opposite different personalities from each other. My nephews, I still can not tell them barely apart and are 6 years old . My cousins they looked identical when younger. As they aged looked related and not identical. Both very different personalities of each other. A personality or individual can not be duplicated. Anyone who has a identical twin or relative or a friend who is a identical twin knows they are two very different people. I thought it would always be fun to have an identical twin.

Even though pups from a litter only share a part of the dna, it’s most likely one of the reasons dog /animal breeders breed. Loosing the life of a spouse and having a child from that spouse or a sibling etc there is a healthy healing aspect in that rather then an unhealthy healing aspect.
 

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It would be interesting to know how many dogs used for cloning were good examples of their breed rather than dogs the owners couldn't stand to live without, faults and all.

Thinking about all the dogs I've owned, the one I would clone (if I was rich and of a different mindset) wouldn't be the one that dotted all the i's and crossed all the t's as far as a breed standard was concerned, it would be the one I had the closest connection to...You know, THAT dog...faults and all. Does anyone else feel this way?
 

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Creepy.

I fell in love with Rolf’s aunt, Lana, and my dream came true when the breeder used her male sibling to sire a litter.

I got my “clone.”
Close relative.
Good enough for me.
Here is a pic of them, first meeting.
They both acted as if they knew one another. Pretty astounding. I’m thinking they smelled like their relatives in Germany, to one another.😁
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I agree with most of what’s been said in the thread already, but I still find the idea of cloning to be pretty interesting.

The personality of the cloned dog would probably be different from the original dog, but what if you could improve your handling and care of the dog to address faults that the dog might be genetically predispositioned to? Or what if you could change how you socialized the dog?

My old girl has a lot of faults - most of which I am either directly responsible for or made worse because I didn’t know how to handle it. I guess the interesting part of cloning to me isn’t whether the dog would be an identical clone, but how my (hopefully) more knowledgeable handling might have a positive impact on the cloned dog.
 

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Are you trying to tell us your dogs smell like wiener schnitzel and beer? ;):giggle:
Oh, my... you just brought to mind wonderful memories.
The day we visited the litter (at 7 weeks) was one of the happiest days of my life. Small German town, clean and tranquil, exactly as you think it might look like. Dogs kept in fantastic conditions. A wonderful couple with young kids, who lovingly socialized the pups. Gorgeous, healthy, happy adult dogs and frisky, enthusiastic puppies.


The breeder brought out a basket of male pups.
Rolf, upper right hand corner.❤
We didn’t know he was Rolf, we let the breeder choose.

The only regret I have is not being able to join them in the house for coffee and a chat.
We had a long drive back to our hotel and had to catch an early flight.
That evening, we had traditional German food and fresh, cold beer.


A perfect day.
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absolutely agree with Cagal, dog would look the same but the personality will be different. it will retain none of the former dogs' training, habits, even tastes...so why bother?
think of it like identical twins separated at birth, one goes to a foreign family overseas and the other stays here. after 20 years, how different do you think they would be? the clone would be the same way..
 

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Oh, my... you just brought to mind wonderful memories.
The day we visited the litter (at 7 weeks) was one of the happiest days of my life. Small German town, clean and tranquil, exactly as you think it might look like. Dogs kept in fantastic conditions. A wonderful couple with young kids, who lovingly socialized the pups. Gorgeous, healthy, happy adult dogs and frisky, enthusiastic puppies.


The breeder brought out a basket of male pups.
Rolf, upper right hand corner.❤
We didn’t know he was Rolf, we let the breeder choose.

The only regret I have is not being able to join them in the house for coffee and a chat.
We had a long drive back to our hotel and had to catch an early flight.
That evening, we had traditional German food and fresh, cold beer.


A perfect day.
View attachment 578200
View attachment 578199
View attachment 578201
Wonderful dog culture in Europe!
 

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This may have been discussed on here before. But this just popped up in my news feed. I guess I can see the allure but it gives me the heebie jeebies.

Dying to know what you guys think?
I don't see a problem with it. It's like if your dog had a twin. If money wasn't an issue, I might consider it if I really liked a dog's physical traits. But I think it would be unhealthy and weird if you did it for the wrong reasons....like you miss your dog so much you can't let go so you want to resurect it or some weird idea like that. I think that would be unhealthy.
 

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Even without considering the ethical, and horrific, implications of using real live host dogs for these clones, I wouldn't ever consider it if it were free! You can't reproduce a soul!
 

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I've been following the research on cloning (sheep, dogs, horses) for years. As an intellectual question, I find it utterly fascinating. Would I do that to "replace" one of my dogs? Absolutely not. We only have a broad understanding of what makes each individual different and unique. As it stands now, the best you could hope for is a second individual who looks like, but doesn't behave like, the parent --- except for very gross indicators such as differential rates of muscle firing, or rates of oxygenation, for example, which can make for greater speed in race horses. Even then, it doesn't guarantee that the animal will lend itself to training, enjoy racing and be faster. As to temperament, personality, trainability, etc., the factors that shape those characteristics can be highly variable (e.g., time spent with the dam, nature of the dam's pregnancy, etc). No, I wouldn't do it, nor recommend it, but it's very interesting to think about.
 
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