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Discussion Starter #1
What are your thoughts on the Cesar Millan's methods? I want to be a pack leader. I want a well behaved dog. I know when I adopt I may not get a dog that listens good, I'll hope for one of course, but I want to be prepared for the worst. One of Cesar methods is when you bring your adopted dog home for the first time, take a 20-30 minutes walk before going in the front door. That it initiates the "right state of mind".. And his walking methods. Are those good or bad methods?
 

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I certainly think it's a good idea to walk your dog a lot. :) It's probably not a bad idea to have them walk behind or beside you; although mine have always wandered in front of me and unquestionably see me as their "leader."

If you do a search you'll find lots of Cesar Millan threads.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I certainly think it's a good idea to walk your dog a lot. :) It's probably not a bad idea to have them walk behind or beside you; although mine have always wandered in front of me and unquestionably see me as their "leader."

If you do a search you'll find lots of Cesar Millan threads.
Thank you Emoore, I'm reading a bit now! :D
 

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Thanks, I've read through some of the thread on Cesar and Victoria. I think most of Cesar's methods are for worst case senarios. I don't want to become what most of those owners on the Dog Whisperer have become. I want to start out on the right foot straight away.
 

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hmmm...not a big fan but he is dealing with dogs that are serious cases. I wouldn't use any of his methods. I think you should buy the book "The Other End of The Leash", talk to several different trainers that use positive methods and find what you are happy with.
 

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I use a mixture of Cesar's method as well as other pro trainers'. I agree that you must be calm and assertive with your dog. But I also believe that they are like children and should not just be a dog. They're like family. I like him though. He's very effective.
 

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Your doing a lot of reading and learning a lot so you're on the right track for sure. When you get the little one I'm sure everyone here will tell you to go to some classes and that will help with socialization and obedience plus your trainer may have his or her own style of training. It may or may not be like Cesar's but that's ok as long as they are gentle and you are comfortable with their style of training.
 

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IMO You would do a lot better to follow the program outlined in Ruff Love (Welcome to Dogwise.com). The program is designed to teach the dog what is expected from him without the use of force or intimidation. Even if you don't follow it exactly (it can be pretty restrictive in the first phase), there is a lot of good advice in the book for problem dogs and for dogs who are new to your household.

Cesar Milan relies heavily on the outdated "dominance theory". It can certainly work but IMO there are much better ways to achieve a well mannered dog.
 

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Another CM thread!

His methods of rehabilitating dogs are very successful for him. Some certain (if uncommon for him) methods are the ones some people take issue with (not me, but some people).

For raising a dog, I think he has a book on that. In my experience, the 3 things he emphasizes (exercise, discipline [rules boundaries limitations] then affection) are sound. A dog who is allowed run of the place (and they WILL take over if they can) is much harder to live with compared to one you set, and enforce, rules for.

That does not mean they will never bark at or chase a cat, or chew something up, but it does make them easier to deal with in those situations, in addition to making them generally more obedient.
 

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Personally, I am a big fan of Patricia McConnell (even if I can't spell her name). What she says makes sense and has worked for me.
 

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Personally, I am a big fan of Patricia McConnell (even if I can't spell her name). What she says makes sense and has worked for me.
Actually, you CAN! And I agree, she's got the knowledge, training, education, and experience to back up what she says.

Patricia McConnell, Ph.D., a Certified Applied Animal Behaviorist, (CAAB) has made a lifelong commitment to improving the relationship between people and animals. She is known worldwide as an expert on canine and feline behavior and dog training, and for her engaging and knowledgeable dog training books, DVDs and seminars. Patricia has seen clients for serious behavioral problems since 1988, and is an Adjunct Associate Professor in Zoology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, teaching "The Biology and Philosophy of Human/Animal Relationships." For fourteen years she dispensed advice about behavior problems, and information about animal behavior research, on Wisconsin Public Radio's Calling All Pets, which was heard in over 90 cities around the country.

A highly-sought after speaker on dog behavior and training, McConnell has presented seminars all over the United States, and in Canada, Germany, Australia, Sweden and Belgium. In 2010 she'll be speaking in Florida, Massachusetts, Toronto, Seattle and New Zealand (see Events).

She is the author of the much-acclaimed books The Other End of the Leash (which is now published in 13 languages), For the Love of A Dog: Understanding Emotions in You and Your Best Friend and Tales of Two Species. Her self-published book and booklets on dog training and dog and cat behavior problems continually receive rave reviews from professional trainers, veterinarians and dog and cat lovers from all over the world. Dr. McConnell is also the behavior columnist for the Bark magazine (The Bark) "the New Yorker of Dog Magazines") and writes for many other publications, including APDT's Chronicle of the Dog and Natural History. She has made numerous television appearances, including spots with Anderson Cooper on CNN, Marth Stewart and Wayne Brady.

Patricia received her Ph.D. in Zoology in 1988 from the University of Wisconsin-Madison researching dog behavior and communication between professional trainers and working domestic animals. Her dissertation received the prestigious Allee Award from the Animal Behavior Society in that same year. Patricia and Nancy Raffetto founded Dog's Best Friend, Ltd in 1988. Dogs Best Friend Training, LLC is now owned and operated by the very capable Aimee Moore of Madison, WI. For more information about dog training classes and behavior consultation in the Madison, WI area, go to Dog's Best Friend Training | Dog Training and Behavior Classes and Consultations - Madison, WI. Patricia has two dogs, one confident cat and a very spoiled flock of sheep on a small farm in Southwestern Wisconsin. Her two Border Collies, Willie & Hope, keep her outside and active, and the memories of her beloved Great Pyrenees, Tulip, keeps her humble. Trisha suffers from Separation Anxiety each time she leaves her dogs at home when she leaves on her numerous speaking engagements around the country.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Your doing a lot of reading and learning a lot so you're on the right track for sure. When you get the little one I'm sure everyone here will tell you to go to some classes and that will help with socialization and obedience plus your trainer may have his or her own style of training. It may or may not be like Cesar's but that's ok as long as they are gentle and you are comfortable with their style of training.
When I get a dog, what ever the breed, I'll adopt. Probably no younger than 2 or 3. I want my first dog to be out of the Puppy stage. And yes I am doing a TON of reading. I got The Dog Bible from the library and I'm reading that from cover to cover and only skipping things on puppies. This is a huge almost 700 page book! I'm not even 200 pages in yet. But it's good stuff. I will definitely take the dog to obedience classes, not only for the dogs sake but also mine. This will be my first dog and I'm still about 2 years away from actually getting one. I'm going into a vocational program that is 8 months long and then I have to get the job, and save up for home furnishing for the apartment I want as I'll be coming straight out of low income housing with no furniture help from my mom. I've already purchased my shower curtain and wall art for my bathroom as an incentive to get to my goal of an apartment and a long awaited dog! lol That shower curtain is going to help me with my anxieties with school, moving out on my own.! I know I'm a nerd, but I'm a visual person so, just see a photo of an apart ain't going to do it! lol I will have my apartment and I will have my dog! And the library is going to be my best friend for the next couple years! lol
 

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I like Cesar but i really have to agree with GsdLoverr729. u should mix it up with everyones advice and in my opinion use your better judgement on what cause and effect a certain method may have. for instance i dont agree with his leash theory about a dog in front. if ur gettin pulled down the street thats a little different.

But what i really do like is that he shows people around my age how to take care of a dog without any physical abuse. a sad fact is that most younger owners think they have to be mean to there gsd or pit to make them "mean and fearless guard dogs". alot of younger owners think they have to "rub there nose in it" or smack them to make the stop deficating or to listen. when my daughter cant get to the bathroom i dont rub her nose in it, and i wont do it to my furry babys either! Probably sound kinda crazy to most people, but were im from its pretty common. i like to use it as an example of non physical training to show other kids the right way and the humane way to train your dog.

hey saw yur from Mi to :) what part if u dont mind me asking?
 

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But what i really do like is that he shows people around my age how to take care of a dog without any physical abuse. a sad fact is that most younger owners think they have to be mean to there gsd or pit to make them "mean and fearless guard dogs". alot of younger owners think they have to "rub there nose in it" or smack them to make the stop deficating or to listen.
Sadly, I don't think this is limited to younger owners, it's passed down from generation to generation.:(
 

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a sad fact is that most younger owners think they have to be mean to there gsd or pit to make them "mean and fearless guard dogs". alot of younger owners think they have to "rub there nose in it" or smack them to make the stop deficating or to listen.
I hardly think this is a fact or that it applies only to younger owners since most of the things you mention are considered "old school" training methods. Not sure what your definition of younger owner is but at almost 27 yrs old with a 3 year old dog, I have never done any of those things nor do I think they are appropriate and I don't know anyone that does.
 

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I hardly think this is a fact or that it applies only to younger owners since most of the things you mention are considered "old school" training methods. Not sure what your definition of younger owner is but at almost 27 yrs old with a 3 year old dog, I have never done any of those things nor do I think they are appropriate and I don't know anyone that does.
I agree, I'm almost 23 years old with an almost 2 year old dog and I dont do those things to him, my friends dont do that with their dogs either.
 

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I hardly think this is a fact or that it applies only to younger owners since most of the things you mention are considered "old school" training methods. Not sure what your definition of younger owner is but at almost 27 yrs old with a 3 year old dog, I have never done any of those things nor do I think they are appropriate and I don't know anyone that does.
It's very common, and not just among young owners. When me and my gf got our first gsd together it was nearly impossible to convince her that is not the proper way to potty train it, she had just been raised that way and they've always had good dogs. I was also raised around several dogs and this is how my dad potty trained all of them. In his defense it did work and we did have really good dogs too. His father (my grandfather) had 9 german shorthair pointers that he used for all kinds of hunting, and he showed them and did dog trials with them. His methods were passed down to my dad, and so on. It's not uncommon.

Although I would never use this method now, and especially not with a breed like the gsd, BUT--honestly those gsp's my grandpa had were some of the most loyal dogs I'd ever seen. They hung on his every word, did whatever he asked. Once while hunting at a farm one of the dogs "willie" wondered off, it had apparently gotten stuck in the abandoned house. Grandpa whistled and called for him and within a couple seconds the dog came crashing through one of the house windows to get to him. Glad he was ok, but I just think that shows some level of commitment, so I guess we can't say it will always RUIN the dog :)
 

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It's actually very common. When me and my gf got our first gsd together it was nearly impossible to convince her that is not the proper way to potty train it, she had just been raised that way and they've always had good dogs. I was also raised around several dogs and this is how my dad potty trained all of them. In his defense it did work and we did have really good dogs too. His father (my grandfather) had 9 german shorthair pointers that he used for all kinds of hunting, and he showed them and did dog trials with them. His methods were passed down to my dad, and so on. It's not uncommon.
Nothing personal, but just because your GF and you thought this way does not make it common and it certainly does not make it a fact. We can argue all day how this young person does it but this young person doesn't. I don't think that it is an older owner vs younger owner thing.

And, as you pointed out, the reason you thought like this is because it was how your parents raised dogs. Doing things like hitting the dog and rubbing their nose in messes is old school.

I was offended that it was posted as a "sad fact" about the younger generation and don't believe it to be the case and felt the need to stand up for the "younger" crowd that knows better than to train a dog that way. Everyone is certainly entitled to their own opinion which is, of course, influenced by their own experiences.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I like Cesar but i really have to agree with GsdLoverr729. u should mix it up with everyones advice and in my opinion use your better judgement on what cause and effect a certain method may have. for instance i dont agree with his leash theory about a dog in front. if ur gettin pulled down the street thats a little different.

But what i really do like is that he shows people around my age how to take care of a dog without any physical abuse. a sad fact is that most younger owners think they have to be mean to there gsd or pit to make them "mean and fearless guard dogs". alot of younger owners think they have to "rub there nose in it" or smack them to make the stop deficating or to listen. when my daughter cant get to the bathroom i dont rub her nose in it, and i wont do it to my furry babys either! Probably sound kinda crazy to most people, but were im from its pretty common. i like to use it as an example of non physical training to show other kids the right way and the humane way to train your dog.

hey saw yur from Mi to :) what part if u dont mind me asking?
I live in Swartz Creek, 3 miles west of Flint.
 
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