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Discussion Starter #1
I'm excited to say the least that I have a deposit on my next female GSD and she's expected to be born sometime in the next week or so. She'll be #4 that I'll have raised from 8 weeks old.

However, today I received an unexpected call from my local vet. Apparently they have a client that needs to re-home a 2 yo intact female GSD due to the owner having a baby on the way and another young child that has become allergic to dogs. This is about all I know so far, but I do intend on finding out more specifics before I commit. One of my vets assistants did say the dog is house broken, crate trained, well behaved and is somewhat of a hi drive.

For the last couple years I've given serious thought about adding a 2nd GSD to my life, but figured it'd be on my terms and I'd know when the time is right. Bu now that one has been put in my lap so to speak, I want to be sure I make the right decision and not just react on a whim. I say 'whim' because in a way I feel my hand is being forced to react. For one thing, I wasn't expecting the 'right time' to just show up at my doorstep like this one has. I know 100% in my mind and my heart I want a 2nd one, so no worries there. I'm also confident that I can handle the additional financial responsibilities as well. Plus now that I've taken an early retirement due to my knee injury, I can devote all the time needed for raising/training 2 GSD's and have the ideal rural property to do so.

But...is it wise to raise 2 females, 2 yrs of age apart? I've heard/read that a 2 yr age difference is a good starting point, but I'm not so sure about both being females. All my previous were girls, so I'm no stranger to that sex. But 2 of them together?? My thoughts are that I have at least 2 months before I bring home the new pup. So in that time, the 2 yo and I should become well acquainted and she would become familiar with her new home and the surroundings. Plus I would think if she already has some training, the 2 months would be more than enough time for her to transition from her current owners training commands to mine. Am I biting off more than I can chew?


Besides the raising 2 females part, I would sincerely appreciate hearing pros & cons, dos and don'ts, the good bad and ugly about transitioning from one GSD to 2...especially from the multi dog owners and those who went from one to two. I have a fairly good idea of what I'm about to face if I do choose to accept this 2 yo. But in case I'm over looking something, I'd like to hear from those of you that have more experience with this matter.


Any and all related experiences are welcome!!
Thanx :)
 

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My personal preference would be to skip on the 2 year old female. I'd rather raise a puppy, and wait till it's fully matured and I'm confident it would be a good role model for a second dog.

I'm resistant to pressure if I think someone's trying to manipulate me. I take my time to make a decision. The 2 year old shouldn't be hard to rehome. The dog isn't your problem. Raising a puppy, especially through the adolescent stage, is at times really tough. I wouldn't do it.

But that's me...
 

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I would also wait. The vets office maybe knew you were looking to add a dog to your home just tell them you already picked out a pup or if you wish to get an adult instead of a pup that is up to you. same sex not always and especially female do not mesh well - not by my own experience but so often with stories on this forum or animal shelters. Life has to be really altered if you have to crate and rotate depending on one’s situation or wants. It is the main reason also why dogs often get rehomed in a busy household. Choose wisely. It really is enjoyable when you have peace in the home and your dogs can not only coexist but actually enjoy each other.
 

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I have two males that I crate and rotate because they don't get along well. It's just part of our daily routine now. But most likely, I will never again get two same sex GSDs. Some people do it without a problem though.
 

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I personally would pass on the adult. I prefer to train and socialize the dog the way I want her trained and socialized. I'm also a giant control freak. So unless it was a breeder I really trusted to know what I liked, I wouldn't be into taking an adult placement.
 

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It depends on the 2 yo female. I may be the odd one out but I adopted 3 adult GSDs in one year about 10 years ago. 2 females and 1 male. Nuts, right? Actually it was the BEST thing I ever did. They were all rescues and wonderful dogs. The females did get into it a few times at first but learned to live together just fine for the rest of their lives. I miss them both terribly as they both passed away last year though we still have the male who is 15 yo. I also have a 1 yo male and a 3 yo female now. They really enjoy each other's company and play all the time.
 

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I'd get one or the other. Personally I bet the 2 year old dog will probably be a project dog. Allergies and new baby is generally (not always) but generally an excuse of a person who doesn't have time or enjoy the dog they have. So 2 year old intact female probably has some sort of training you'll have to do and need work to get her to where you want and in two months with a puppy you have a deposit on combined with the increase incidence of female/female aggression in GSD I'd say it's not worth it. If I was in your place I'd pass on the adult female.
 

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I would suggest meeting with the adult dog before making any decisions. She just might be the perfect dog you always dreamed of.

I think things can go either way with same sex females, sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't and you will have to either crate and rotate or rehome one. Is there any chance of moving your deposit from a female pup to a male pup?

If it weren't for two females, I say this is easily doable.
 

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I’ve perused many an ad (just to look) and I cannot tell you how many dogs are out of a home because their people decide they 1. Cannot put forth the effort to find living arrangements that accommodates their dog(s) or 2. Decide to pop out a baby. I realize children take tons of work, but as someone who has grown up always with dogs in the house fail to understand why it’s such a deal breaker? Dogs can be very adjustable. I feel it’s all just an excuse at the heart of it.

I wouldn’t be so dead set on the older dog before even meeting her. If you do meet and like her, what are the odds you can change your puppy plans to a male?
 

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It's really going to depend on the dogs...I've had many different combinations and two females can work.....but the worst "pair" I ever had was a mother and daughter...once the hormones started to flow and the daughter realized she was a female...we started seeing the "stares"--lowered head and stiff body all from the daughter--when the daughter was between 2-3 years old-the two got in a fight while we were playing with balls after a training session...I broke them apart and we had a face to face and nose to nose "talk" about how things were going to be.....never had another fight but they were kept separated when I was not home for the most part.....when I was home they gave each other a wide berth and respected each others space but only because I was there....it was obvious the daughter hated her mother for life !!...still makes me sad to put that to words and post it here....females USUALLY never ever forgive or forget IMO....so it's a combination that can work with the "right" two females..but since the pup is not an adult and you can't tell what she may grow into....it's risky
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for all the replies! It appears the majority agrees not to take the 2 yo, mainly because its female. Yet there are a couple that say it ~might~ work with 2 females. Myself, I'm more inclined to think I have more than a reasonable chance at success. But I say that because when I commit to something, I would be 110% dedicated to succeed and won't give up no matter what I'm facing. The last thing I would want is to become another statistic by re-homing one of them. If the risk of that is that great, then yes I'd be better off passing. No sense in causing more trauma to the 2 yo than what she may experience after I take her...if I did.


I have no doubt in my abilities based on what I experienced raising my previous girls. But raising 2 at the same time would be a new experience for me. Having to crate and keep them separate would be cruel IMO and is something I don't want to have to do long term. I'm guessing at first they would likely get along ok, but as the pup matures, the risk of not getting along increases? Yet there is a voice inside me that's saying go for it. And the confidence that I have agrees. Am I up for it?...absolutely positively yes! But do I have any doubts...yes, which is why I asked for opinions. I have doubts because my dedication to my commitments might cause me more harm than good. The last thing I need is to be traumatized again, especially after what I went through with Marley.

I'm not trying to sell myself and get others to agree to my decision, instead I would prefer to be slapped upside the head to make me sure I understand the difference between reality and fantasy. It's not that I'm religious, but I do feel this opportunity was presented to me for a reason, and I don't want to let it pass if I have more than a reasonable chance at succeeding. Kinda sounds corny saying that, but its the best way I can express myself in words.


While I did express an interest to taking the 2 yo, I also said I needed a couple days to think about it. One thing for certain, I need to meet the dog in person and see her reactions before I make any decision. That first impression will speak volumes and I know enough to know what signs to look for. Then I'd like to know her history and if any health concerns are present. Is she up to date with vaccinations, recent vet visits, etc. This may sound like more than what the current owners want to deal with. But if they want me to take her, I want to be certain they're not passing off a problem dog to me.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
My personal preference would be to skip on the 2 year old female. I'd rather raise a puppy, and wait till it's fully matured and I'm confident it would be a good role model for a second dog.

I'm resistant to pressure if I think someone's trying to manipulate me. I take my time to make a decision. The 2 year old shouldn't be hard to rehome. The dog isn't your problem. Raising a puppy, especially through the adolescent stage, is at times really tough. I wouldn't do it.

But that's me...

What am I missing that would cause a properly trained female pup not to be a good candidate to get along with another female? I know how females can be and I've dealt with their moody behaviors in the past. But never with 2 of them though at the same time.



If anything, the pressure for a decision is from my own mind, not someone else. I just don't want to let an opportunity pass if it's worthwhile.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I would also wait. The vets office maybe knew you were looking to add a dog to your home just tell them you already picked out a pup or if you wish to get an adult instead of a pup that is up to you. same sex not always and especially female do not mesh well - not by my own experience but so often with stories on this forum or animal shelters. Life has to be really altered if you have to crate and rotate depending on one’s situation or wants. It is the main reason also why dogs often get rehomed in a busy household. Choose wisely. It really is enjoyable when you have peace in the home and your dogs can not only coexist but actually enjoy each other.

My vet only knew I'd be looking for another GSD, not having 2 of them. One of the reasons I feel more confident if I did take the 2yo is that my vet would not recommend me to the current owners or vise versa. I did mention I have a deposit on another female pup and if the 2 females would get along. They said the same as was said here...some work out great and others not so much. The assistant I spoke with has 2 GSD's herself...IIRC one of each sex though...and felt this 2 yo would be a good companion with another female and felt confident that I would be capable of raising them.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I have two males that I crate and rotate because they don't get along well. It's just part of our daily routine now. But most likely, I will never again get two same sex GSDs. Some people do it without a problem though.

How old are they now and how old when you had to start crating/rotating?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I would take one or the other. Not both. You don't have time to bond with the 2 year old before the puppy cones and that's not fair to her.

Personally, I never want two females at the same time ever again. Bitches make stitches.
Your post is a reality check that I didn't consider. I would have thought 8-10 weeks would be enough time to start building the basics of trust and bonding. I recognized it around that time period with Marley.


I will heed your warning before I make a final decision though as I do respect your opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
It depends on the 2 yo female. I may be the odd one out but I adopted 3 adult GSDs in one year about 10 years ago. 2 females and 1 male. Nuts, right? Actually it was the BEST thing I ever did. They were all rescues and wonderful dogs. The females did get into it a few times at first but learned to live together just fine for the rest of their lives. I miss them both terribly as they both passed away last year though we still have the male who is 15 yo. I also have a 1 yo male and a 3 yo female now. They really enjoy each other's company and play all the time.

I appreciate the encouraging words! I'd like to think I have what it takes to echo your same words years down the road. Thanks for chiming in!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Allergies and new baby is generally (not always) but generally an excuse of a person who doesn't have time or enjoy the dog they have.
That was my initial thought after being told why they wanted to re-home her after 2 yrs. I realize everyone has their issues, but wanting to get rid of her after 2 yrs would not be something I could do.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I would suggest meeting with the adult dog before making any decisions. She just might be the perfect dog you always dreamed of.

I think things can go either way with same sex females, sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't and you will have to either crate and rotate or rehome one. Is there any chance of moving your deposit from a female pup to a male pup?

If it weren't for two females, I say this is easily doable.
I do intend on meeting the 2 yo, possibly tomorrow or Thur if that works for her owners.



I absolutely have to be 110% certain with my decision because there is no way I want to be faced with the to re-home either of them.



I did give a passing thought to moving the deposit to a male, but I can't do it with my current thinking. There is something deep inside me about raising another 8 week old female that I can't shake. Maybe after I meet the 2 yo I'll change my way of thinking and reconsider a male.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I’ve perused many an ad (just to look) and I cannot tell you how many dogs are out of a home because their people decide they 1. Cannot put forth the effort to find living arrangements that accommodates their dog(s) or 2. Decide to pop out a baby. I realize children take tons of work, but as someone who has grown up always with dogs in the house fail to understand why it’s such a deal breaker? Dogs can be very adjustable. I feel it’s all just an excuse at the heart of it.

I wouldn’t be so dead set on the older dog before even meeting her. If you do meet and like her, what are the odds you can change your puppy plans to a male?

I absolutely refuse to become one of those statistics that re-home because they can't handle the dog(s). And with that said, it tells me that I need to be more that just 100% certain with my final decision. It's an all or nothing deal for me.
 
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