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I got a German Shepherd 8 months ago. Currently, he is 10 months old (just turned 10 months two days ago) and his name is Enzo. It has been a hard time with Enzo in regards to training and behaviour and also health. Recently we discovered that Enzo has blood mites and he has had a loose motion on multiple occasions. That is all being sorted efficiently, however his behaviour is an issue that just seems like one that can not be solved. I've been training Enzo hard for the past 8 months but it just seems like he doesn't get it. I've gone online checked methods on training done almost all of them (except for very conventional methods) But it just seems not to be working at all, and it is very frustrating. he is not food motivated and would rather play than eat, but when I use toys as a method of training, it still does not work. I've gotten in various dog trainers to teach me how to train Enzo, but it is not helping. He doesn't listen to any command (sit, stay, down etc.) and whenever I try to train him, he tries to bite me wherever he can. Just today I was trying and he kept on going for my crotch.

I am at a loss right now, and I have no idea what else I can do. I feel defeated and I feel like giving up. I live Enzo so so much, I mean he's my first doggo, but I do not know if I'm cut out for dogs. Any help possible would be very much appreciated. Please help :(

Thank you for listening to my rambling.
 

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Have you talked to these people? Royal K9 Services is Pakistan's first IPO / Schutzhund Training Center and Club.

 

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First of all, since this is your first dog, you have much to learn. Time to read as much as you can....books, websites like this, etc. A GOOD trainer would help...not any old trainer. @Dunkirk gave you a good suggestion. Give them a call. Second, IT'S 10 MONTHS OLD! It's still a puppy. I think your expectations are way too high. It's barely into its adolescence. It's not even close to being an adult dog yet. Of course it wants to play. Third, biting is a sign that it's still a puppy. There are plenty of threads on biting in these forums. Do a search and read up on it. 4, if your dog is not food motivated, try a different treat (a high value treat) that gets him really excited. If any food/treats don't work....you said it loves to play. Use the play as a reward for training. My dog loves his frisbee, so I use it to train him...it works better than any treat for my dog.

Best thing you can do, is to keep asking questions. There are a lot of experienced GSD owners in here that I learned a lot from in the 14 years I've been on here. First do a search, if you can't find the answer, then ask the question. Good luck
 

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I feel your pain... When I brought my German Shepherd puppy home a few months ago, I was completely overwhelmed. I have had Labradors and Labrador mixes for 40 years. They did not prepare me at all for my new bundle of energy, nerves, and attitude that I now had. Here are a couple of things that helped me:
1. 'A tired dog is a good dog.' This saying oversimplifies it a bit, but the principle holds. Young Shepherds have boundless energy and curiosity. If you don't focus that energy and curiosity on something, they will come up with ways to entertain themselves.
2. Ask questions everywhere. It is very easy for new handlers to misread the emotions of a German Shepherd. For example, my pup lunged at, barked at, and tried to attack every person or dog he saw. At first, I thought it was aggression, when, in fact, he was scared and unsettled. The people on this forum helped me figure that out. -- Take the answers that you receive with a grain of salt and a thick skin.
3. Shop around for a trainer, There are as many ways to train a dog as there are to skin a cat. Several of the local trainers did not seem prepared to teach me how to teach Ole. This might seem strange but, there seems to be a big difference between how some trainers train dogs and how they tell students to train dogs. When teaching, some trainers seem to follow a check-list of protocols that they insist are the way to teach a dog. When they handle the dog themselves, they evolve their techniques to what works for the particular dog and situation. Find a trainer that seems to match your personality, the personality of your dog, and the goals for your dog.
4. Add structure to your pup's life. By this, I don't military-level discipline. Rather, try to be as clear, consistent, and fair to your dog about what you expect from them. Small thing things like; going out the door the same way every time, waiting politely for mealtimes, bedtime and playtime rituals. When the pup knows what is expected of him, he will start figuring out how to meet your expectations... That is much more enjoyable for everyone then constantly nagging pup to do the right things.
5. Depending on your dog, your environment and your experiences, actually training a dog is pretty easy. The hard part is for you, as the human, to figure out how to communicate with your dog so that you can effectively train him.

This has all been pretty philosophical. As a specific example, we can look at puppies biting. Dogs like to bite. The primary way they interact with the world is through their mouth. The challenge for us is to figure out how to help them learn what is appropriate for them to bite and what is not appropriate for them to bite:
1. At any given time, I try to have 3-4 fun things laying around the house the pup to chew. To keep it interesting, I like to rotate them.
2. Try flirt poles and tugs to give pup something bite on while playing with you. It took my pup awhile to understand that while feet and hands are off-limits, I will play tug with him until he is exhausted. (I am from Wisconsin where it is snowy in the winter. We would play tug for a while. Then pup would go over to a snowbank to lie down and catch his breath and cool off before coming back for more.)
3. Whenever possible redirect rather than punish. At six months, I still use baby gates to keep pup confined to our puppy-proofed living room. I also wear a fleece vest with a pocketful of chews. Whenever pup looks like he is getting ready to chew something. I have something to redirect him to. My mom who is 80 is horrible at redirection. Whenever pup comes up to her playfully she jerks whatever she has in her hands away. To pup, it seems like a fleeing squirrel. So, he fixates on it :( Your luck my vary with other family members.
4. After several weeks of redirection, I added the verbal cue uh-uh. Now, pup knows that if he hears uh-uh he should find something else to chew. To be completely honest, pup still loves rolls of toilet paper. Once he gets a roll he will not trade it for anything. Rather than fight with him about it, we moved the toilet paper to a high shelf he can not reach. When he is older and has more self-control I will tackle the issue of leaving toilet paper alone.
 
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Listen, my friend, it's your approach, not you! You seem to care, but maybe just don't yet have the understanding or skills to get where you want to be with your dog.

First, I would suggest that you appreciate that your dog is a unique individual, highly intelligent, but in a different way from people.

Second is you can't lie to dog! If you care, and you just be real, they get that. Don't try to emulate anyone or anything. Be you!

With that, it's good to be both upbeat and confident! A dog, any dog, won't follow you if you're not confident...so act like you are when you're not!! (Ironic that I'm telling you you can't lie, then saying fake it! But try it it helps both with your confidence and your dog's reaction to it).

I don't know if you've had dogs before, but dogs think differently than humans. So much so, that MANY PEOPLE think their dog understands X, when the dog ACTUALLY understands Z!

By that I mean, you think you're training one thing, when in fact you're training them something completely unexpected!

Connection and communication are key! With a puppy, mostly younger than yours, but I mention it because you may have missed that stage, play is how they learn! It's all about finding that communication pathway. Training...the first time you give a command and your dog complies - wow!!! Connection!!!

That first one is the hardest. From then on it gets much easier to communicate what you want!

But, training and life in general its all about connection! Connect with your puppy through play and fun stuff.

I totally get you're apprehensive about your particular situation, but stop, think...

If you can find an experienced trainer to help you great, but if you can't you have to reassess what you have tried and try something new!

It sounds to me like he's been allowed to ignore you so long it's become a habit. And now, if you try to enforce a command, he uses his teeth to prevent that. Understand that you have actually taught him these things by allowing it in the first place!

Now you have to find a way to break that habit! And that's where a good, balanced trainer can help!

If none are available to you, I would suggest taking your dog somewhere new and tiring him out playing and exploring first. A tired puppy will be more receptive. Then practice a single command like sit. Enforce it everytime!

And by that I don't mean be cruel or punish him, just calmly tell him sit once, don't repeat it, but use the leash and or a treat or both to help him into a sitting position. There are some good YouTube videos that can show you how to lure your puppy into a sit. Watch Stonnie Dennis! He's got a bunch of puppy training videos, and he explains things very clearly!
 
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