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i have always wanted a dog but dont know what to get.. its between a siberian husky or a german shepard .....

i am 21 and have a normal size back yard and work part time and go to school .

i been trying to find out which breed is easily to train and better with cats since i have to at home .

is it better to get a puppy or to get one from a rescue shelter

also what does it cost like to own a dog

any help and suggestions please and thanks
 

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Puppies are a LOT more time. I suggest an older dog.

Both breeds have lots of prey drive, and cats are fair game. TRAINING can help, but don't leave them alone together.

Well, there are the vet costs, shots, physical exams. Then when you need to bring the dog in for sickness or injury... It gets expensive fast.

Food, if you feed kibble, one 50lb bag every few weeks runs about $40+ a bag.

Then you will of course need a crate, leashes, collars, toys, bedding, grooming supplies (brushes/combs, shampoo's)extras (treats, other collars, ect.)

If you have a behavioral problem and want a trainer, it runs in the hundreds.

And damages, all dogs mess things up, especially puppies, they destroy when they get bored.


Thousannds of dollars a year, and if your dog gets into an accident requiring surgery/staying at the vets, add a few K more.

But it varies. Dogs are expensive.

Not to mention the hours of time, and the patience needed.

I'm sure you will get better answers than mine.
 

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WOW APBT what a downer. LOL just kidding. but i do have to disagree on one point. "Puppies are a LOT more time. I suggest an older dog." A older dog can be just as much work if the older dog has behavior problems.


I think both dogs are great dogs, i have owned a Huskie and now that I have a GS i would never own anything else. With that being said a older dog mght have a problem with a cat as to where a pup raised with the cat could become best friends. Of course same goes for a older dog but more likely with a pup.

Cost in owning any pet is expensive. Throw out what you pay for the dog. Figure out food, vet ect.....and plan on putting out at least a grand the first year. Of course the love they give you back will never have a dollar amount. :) :)
 

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I agree with APBT that puppies are typically more work. I certainly wasn't prepared for it when I got my puppy.

I would suggest getting a 2-3 yr old dog from a rescue that has been in a foster home for a few weeks. Then you would have a good idea of the dog's personality and what training he/she may require. Also, many foster homes have other pets (including cats) and you could get a dog that has shown it is cat friendly (or atleast cat tolerant).
 

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I also agree with APBTLove that generally puppies are WAY more work with training, socialization, money and time than most adult dogs. Specially if you go thru a rescue so can really have the opportunity to get to know the older dog and it's needs.

Both your choices have alot of fur, so just be aware of the maintenance and vacuuming that involves (though most dogs shed some...).
 

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You would need to use all the free time you might have for the dog. I wouldn't suggest getting a puppy since you work and have school, you wouldn't be home enough to housetrain it/regular train it, and it would cost you a lot for doggie day care/dog walking. An older dog would be better, so that you already know it's personality, and how it does with cats. I don't agree with the fact that you can't leave a GSD alone with a cat; our GSD is alone with my boyfriend's four cats all the time and there are no problems, you just need to make sure that they are okay with cats and won't hurt them.

They are definitely expensive. We've probably spent over 2 grand in the 4 months we've had Frag. Vet bills, different collars, because a puppy outgrows them quick, and not to mention a 30lb bag of dog food every two weeks. We were feeding purina puppy chow, but that sucks, so we switched to raw. Now we're paying about $27 a week to feed him RAW. Better kibble costs upwards of $30 per 15lb bag. Multiply that by about three a month and you get $90 a month. Times 12 months equals $1080 a year. That's for a puppies feeding, and I may be exagerating just how much mine eats, as he hasn't been on kibble in a while, but you see how quickly it can add up.
 

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I'm going to agree with APBT.

Puppies require way more time than an older puppy or young dog. Young puppies like small infants require more time in smaller increments. You need to be prepared to be up several times through the night and avaliableat minimum every four hours for at least a couple months to get that puppy potty trained.

You might have a rowdy older dog that needs lots of exercise and training, but it can still be left for multiple hours without accidents. And I cannot see why you would get an older puppy or dog with behavior problems. Sure sometimes we get those dogs with compassion in our hearts from rescue, however, there are a number of people who have dogs with behavior problems that they raised from puppies- so it's not necessarily young dog=no behavior problems.

I also disagree with the puppy raised with cats means that they'll be best friends. We had 2 cats when we got Argos as an 8 week old. Argos had been raised with cats. The cats hated the puppy and never adjusted, they always ran and growled. The puppy grew up into a young dog that woud listen to commands but still wanted to eat the cats. The cats did OK with an older GSD that we had rescued that we cat tested before bringing her home. I think a lot of the dog/cat relationship also depends on the cats.

I think GSDs are way more trainable than Huskies. Shepherds are more "into" their people, while Huskies tend to be more independent. Either one will get into trouble if given too much free time. And Either way you're going to have alot of hair everywhere!

Pet Ownership is expensive. Puppies are way more expensive. Once you get past the initial cost of the dog (a quality puppy runs $800-$1500, while an older puppy or dog from a breeder may cost more depending on what training there has been, and of course a dog from rescue is the least expensive option) you then have vet bills. Puppies have 3 or 4 vet visits that they need and I have yet to have a puppy that didn't need to go to the vet for at least one extra thing- from vaccine reactions, pyoderma, or just an extra worming. A healthy older puppy or dog only has to go once a year. A dog from rescue has the added benefit of already being altered, so that's one less expense also.

With quality food, treats, heartworm meds, and flea treatment my adult dogs average about $80 a month. Add in training which is another $60 a month. Training is essential for a puppy. They need that socialization and early learning to help them develop into a well behaved adult.

Most important is not to impulse get a dog. Know what you want and really look to find exactly what you want. I know so many people who have decided they want a dog, call the first ad they see online or in the paper and go buy it. Take your time and evaluate and you'll be more likely to get a companion that will enrich your life.
 

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A rescue will normally have all the vet work done already as well. Shots, spay/nueter etc. That can get really expensive when you utilize your own private vet.

I would also suggest a rescue. The potty training stage is really rough, and you already work and go to school. So that will save you some time. There is also a special bond that you'll have with your new dog knowing that it was you who saved it's life.
 

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A puppy is usually more work, but if given the choice, I would rather do the extra work of raising a puppy RIGHT (socialization being the key component) than working through rehab with an older dog that may have issues.

NEITHER of them is easy though; you probably know that but it doesn't hurt to point it out again.

I agree with the previous posts that said the dog/cat relationship is very possible but also depends on the cats. My dog Dana (RIP) was introduced to cats as an adult, and she really only got along well with one of the cats in my mom's house-- the cat (found as a stray) who for some reason was comfortable around big dogs. I'd wager that cats could be trained to some extent to see dogs as "OK" but I don't know. There were some cats in my mom's house that would just not come around Dana. Dana would probably be curious but the cats would be freaked out which could lead to the cat attacking and a dog retaliating.

I have come to realize that the energy level and prey drive of a dog plays in to the amount you'll spend on veterinarian care. I've never taken a dog to the vet as much as Tuki, she is just designed to chase things that move and has injured herself repeatedly doing it. Keep that in mind when getting a dog-- it is much easier to raise and afford a dog without strong innate drives that go against what you want as a dog owner. You probably want to take your dog on walks where there may be other dogs, cats, squirrels, geese.

Yes you can train a dog to focus on you instead of the environment, but if you got a more laid back dog from the start, things would be that much easier.

If I didn't have all my free time (after work) to dedicate to a dog, I would choose an adult who was known to be somewhat mellow. You may not find a German Shepherd or Husky like this available to you, though.
 

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I'd have to agree with APBT! it's a lot of work. kinda like having a kid. you have to invest time and effort in order to keep from getting a delinquent
 

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i have always wanted a dog but dont know what to get.. its between a siberian husky or a german shepard .....
Well, as someone who has had both, I would say a German Shepherd without a doubt. They are both beautiful "wolf like" creatures but the Siberian Husky lacks loyalty...lol. That's a big thing to me. They will run the first chance they get every single time. And good luck catching them. They jump like kangaroos, they dig which is part of the breed (to get warm in the snow), they can be very independent, they will usually kill all small animals even when raised with them. They also have no desire to please you. Trainability is low. Yes, it can be accomplished but it takes A LOT more work than training a shepherd from my experience. They will never be an off leash dog. Off course there are always exceptions to the rule but I've never run across one.;)

I grew up with Siberians and my sister currently has one. And when I got my first Shepherd, I was blown away...by their loyalty, their protectiveness, their desire to please, their utter devotion to my every waking thought and move, their trainability. The difference was shocking.

I can't imagine ever getting a Siberian again. I think they are magnificent, beautiful animals but they don't fit my life style or needs. I need a co-dependent dog and that is not a Siberian. Heh.

I will say that I agree with everyone's advice above. Both take work. Both take commitment. I just found a GS to be loyal and easier to train. Good luck to you.
 

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Also, take into account what type of personality your cats have. We have three cats and Anna, who was raised with them, treats them each differently based on their personality.

Simon is laid back and doesn't care--so they hang out and even take naps together. Mia is a spaz and likes to play, so Anna chases her. Alley is lazy and just hangs out...so Anna pretty much ignores her. It's not all on the dog, you need to know your cat as well.

Owning any dog costs money, food, chews, toys, supplies, training and then vet visits. As they get older they cost more...I spend a nice chunk on supplements for my senior. BUT you cannot put a price tag on the love they give you.

Just be prepared for the costs...it might not be a bad idea to go ahead and do research now to find out what kind of food you want to feed and do a yearly cost analysis. Call your vet and get a price guide for the first year of shots/care. And if you're anal retentive like me, put it in a spreadsheet and get an idea of your monthly/yearly costs.

And of course, make sure you have the most important thing for your dog--time. ;)
 

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Huskies will most likely go after your cats, some when raised around cats will be fine with them and some will not. They have a very high prey drive. Huskies are harder to train and tend to have a mind of their own. You need a 6 foot fence! They are great climbers and excellent escape artists! They dig too, so if you have a beautiful yard you might end up with a few holes. Huskies should NEVER be trusted off leash, they are runners and they will run away at any opertunity. They are "talkers" or from what I have experienced "screamers". They have ALOT more energy than GSD's. If they dont get enough exercise they will become destructive! I had one for almost 4 weeks and he was absolutely horrible, that does not mean yours will be. I have done ALOT of research on that breed and got one and gave it away. After what I experienced with that breed I will NEVER have one again. PLEASE DO YOUR RESEARCH ON THE BREED. EVERYTHING THING THAT I SAID CAME FROM A VERY RECOMMENDED BOOK ABOUT THE BREED
 

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i have always wanted a dog but dont know what to get.. its between a siberian husky or a german shepard .....
You already got lots of good info from other people, but I just had to point out that it's shepherd, not shepard. GSDs are a herding breed, hence the "herd" in their name. We don't expect everyone here to know how to spell dachshund, or chihuahua or bichon frise or shih tzu, but if you're considering getting a GSD, you should learn how to spell the name properly, especially since it's relevant to purpose of the breed.

Carry on, and good luck! :D
 

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Well as a student who works and who raised a puppy I would say go with w/e age makes you the most comfortable, maybe it was more work but I wouldn't trade her for any other dog ever! Honestly I didn't find it to be that much work because lets face it puppies are cute, and theres a reason for that :D You can't stay mad or frustrated at them for long :wub:

As far as GSD vs Husky, our friend has a husky she adopted when he was 1.5 and he has absolutely no interest in her cat. So like any dog it depends on the personality. I personaly LOVE the way huskys look but same with the GSDs and for me having been around both I would choose the GSD for personality and looks any day, but its a personal preferance, ask my friend and she would probably choose the husky :)
 

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its between a siberian husky or a german shepard .....
What made you pick those two breeds? They are very, VERY different!

On the whole, Shepherds are more willing to work with their people. Huskies tend to be more self-minded.

There are no absolutes in either breed - such as never allowing a Husky off leash. There is a board member that does agility with her husky - very highly titled dog, too! :)

Puppy or adult? It depends on your desires. From what you describe I would suggest looking into a young adult from a REPUTABLE rescue that has tested the dog around cats (whether you go GSD or Sibe).

Costs - I'd say plan on $100 per month for food, toys, training and medical expenses. You might have a month or two (or even three) go by where you have no vets visits but then you might get hit with an emergency visit that runs over $500. Having a savings for vet care is a must!
 

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You need a 6 foot fence!
We had a six foot fence and they still climbed it. We used to joke that they were kangaroos. We actually put a tilt on our fence and they climbed that, too. They also dug under the fence. We actually dug our fence three feet below ground to stop them. LOL! It was crazy. In the winter, they wanted to be outside 24/7. It was impossible to be outside with them as much as they wanted to be.

They are great climbers and excellent escape artists!
Truer words were never spoken.

They dig too, so if you have a beautiful yard you might end up with a few holes. Huskies should NEVER be trusted off leash,
I agree. I know there may be exceptions to the rule like Lauri pointed out but that's the exception that proves the rule, IMO. Yes, you can train them but there is a reason you don't see them in agility courses (or that it's rare if you do). But for a new person, I would voice the rule rather than the exception to it. Why work against nature? They are predisposed to dig, run, high prey drive and being INDEPENDENT. It's one thing if they are those things and still care about what you think...but they don't.:laugh: That's why I love GS's. Yes, they can also dig, have high prey drive, etc., but they want to please you so training comes more easily. That's something a Husky lacks. You're going to have to work 1000 times harder to get a Husky to do what GS does.

My sister was determined to get a Husky. She had fond memories of their looks when she was younger. Since she was much younger than me, she forgot all those mornings before school that we spent looking for them because they escaped and killed some neighbors chickens. She adopted one from a shelter and it had all the problems I told her it would have...digger, escape artist, killed small animals. She swore she'd never adopt another dog. I told her it had nothing to with being an adopted dog and everything to do with the breed! Don't fight what a dog was bred to do. Pick a dog that fits with your life style. If you want a dog that doesn't run away, stack the odds in your favor by not getting a Husky. JMO.

After what I experienced with that breed I will NEVER have one again.
It's like we're the same person.:)
 

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We got our GSD as an 8 week old pup. Personally, this worked out great for us so far. We have flexible schedules so he's not left alone very much. A puppy is alot of work - but I have really enjoyed training him ourselves. We take pride in his accomplishments.

However, if you have a busy schedule - you may want to check out the rescue adult dogs. I'm sure there are plenty out there that need a loving home. I think some people think that just because they're in a rescue, they're 'bad dogs'. That's not true. Alot of times, people have stellar dogs and were just in over their heads too much to properly care for them... and end up giving them up. One of the perks I've learned about adult dogs is that you already know what their personality will be!

As far as the breed - we've never owned a Husky, but did alot of research as we were trying to make the same decision that you're making. From what I read (and I'm no expert, so please do your own research too as everyone's lifestyle is different) is that Husky's can be more headstrong and a little harder to train than a GSD. Also read that they are diggers. On that note, our GSD recently started a little digging of his own if he gets bored outside. There are pros and cons to every individual breed and dog - just do alot of reading and see what matches your lifestyle better.

As far as costs go, the previous posters outlined them pretty well. My personal experience is that we at first tried to limit our spending as much as we can due to a tight budget. But the more of a bond we've built with Jaz, the more he's really like another child to us. You want the absolute best for them. From quality of food to the quality of vet care. So yeh, it can be pricey - but worth every single penny
 
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