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Discussion Starter #81

559082

like pushing a button now :)

559083

flirtpole stick is 7 feet long. When I brace the butt against the sole of my boot it creates a springpole effect. He's swinging near a foot off the ground now and holding fast. I am pleasantly surprised by his progress.

559084

ouch! poor bear... I think we're just about ready for a longer pole and a bigger lure here...
I expect he'll be on the bitearm within a month or so.
 

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Discussion Starter #82 (Edited)
:oops: the following thumbnails may be inappropriate for more sensitive viewers

clicking discretion is advised

d112b.JPG .... d112c.JPG .... d112d.JPG
little gelmo der bärenfalle @ 112 days old

FAIR WARNING to all bite pr0n addicts and protection sport hooligans, this ain't no bulldog, and it ain't no sport dog. If you're going to train like this, you best be fair, you best be consistent, and you best hope that dog really loves you. These are very serious genetics we're playing with here. I have been around, you know? And I am totally blown away.

Your thoughts will be most welcomed, Dr. Blasiole.
 

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I'm curious, genuinely. Not at all sarcastic.
I started out in life as a horsewoman. I love animals. I did obedience with the dogs when I was younger. I worked for 15 years or so as a patrol dog handler. I showed people how to teach their pet dogs basic obedience and helped with house and crate training for the rescues. Just to give you some idea where I am coming from with this question.
Why the push to train puppies? I understand the exposure and creating the invincible me confidence, it's how I raised the patrol prospects. But they never got certified before 18 months old, and usually not before two. I am genuinely, truly curious why I see this push, not just from you, to have these babies working so young.
 

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Discussion Starter #84
At this age especially, you can't push. Either the dog wants to, or he doesn't.

Wolf depredation is on the rise here, and they've killed dogs in broad daylight not 30 miles away. Last summer they killed 13 sheep in a pen. Little gelmo sleeps in a chain link kennel right outside my window, so he's safe at night. All I expect of him is to wake me in the event of trouble. But come fall, when mothers start teaching pups to hunt... You just never know... Coyote and wolf range overlaps here and occasional hybrid offspring are unnaturally aggressive.

Sooner or later he may choose to put his life on the line for what's mine, and I intend to do everything in my power to prepare him for that scenario. Failure to do so on my part would be no different than sending you on a tour of duty without ammo. For now he's just a happy puppy playing a fun game, but someday he may very well find himself backed into a corner.
 

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Hmm. If encountering a wolf or coywolf is truly the concern, wouldn't he be better equipped by roughhousing with other dogs, of many different breeds?

Does he play and wrestle with your other dogs at all?
 

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Discussion Starter #86
Constantly. When he bites too hard they correct him. My other dogs are REALLY SCARY! But I won't muddy up the board with any of that unless/until I have good reason.
I should make clear, I have no intention of EVER deliberately or intentionally risking little gelmo's life. I wouldn't go to all the time and trouble only to lay it all on the line, for what? I have very big plans for these genetics. "Big" relative to my humble lifestyle, that is.
I wasn't even seeking a gsd. I'd actually planned to pick up a working male herdxguard mix this spring when little gelmo happened along. Glad I had room for him when he showed up.
Just a reminder, it's only a teddy bear tied to a stick with a string of bailing twine. I expect most gsd pups could do anything little gelmo can do. For all intents and purposes he's just a random sample from the gsd genepool. I don't mean to tout him as "above average" by any stretch. When I say "blown away" I mean by the breed at large, not this individual specifically.
 

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At this age especially, you can't push. Either the dog wants to, or he doesn't.

Wolf depredation is on the rise here, and they've killed dogs in broad daylight not 30 miles away. Last summer they killed 13 sheep in a pen. Little gelmo sleeps in a chain link kennel right outside my window, so he's safe at night. All I expect of him is to wake me in the event of trouble. But come fall, when mothers start teaching pups to hunt... You just never know... Coyote and wolf range overlaps here and occasional hybrid offspring are unnaturally aggressive.

Sooner or later he may choose to put his life on the line for what's mine, and I intend to do everything in my power to prepare him for that scenario. Failure to do so on my part would be no different than sending you on a tour of duty without ammo. For now he's just a happy puppy playing a fun game, but someday he may very well find himself backed into a corner.
That is abnormally aggressive and wasteful for wolves. They are the ghosts of the forest for a reason and seldom kill more then they need. Confronting dogs is an anomalous behavior. Stalking? Absolutely. Defending a den site without question but wolves are characterized as curious not aggressive.
Anyway, thanks for the answer. I raise them a bit different and a bit the same. At your boys age we are exploring and learning the world. Climbing, chasing, killing teddies. BUT my pups sleep with me, are often fed by hand and encouraged to follow me into, onto or over anything. We do crate training and learn to be alone. Different goals I guess. I am raising with an eye to personal protection, you are teaching guarding. The job you need is of necessity independent of humans. The goals I have very clearly involve me being the focus.
 

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Discussion Starter #88
559249

In fond remembrance I inform readers that bear fell victim to a fatal training accident earlier this evening. We did everything we could for him, but in the end he was just too weak. Bear was brilliant and amazing, but he lived life on the edge and he knew the risks he was taking. Life is short. Shorter for some than others. And so little gelmo and I solemnly forge ahead on our quest without him. Gone but never forgotten…
 
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