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I skimmed through both articles. The dominance theory has always seemed over the top to me, mostly because I just don't believe the "average" pet owner would be consistent or clear in that type of training. IE: "Mom sits on me and growls at me when I jump up on her, but laughs and doesn't care when I bark at her or take food off the table." And I just don't think most people can "perform" these animal behaviors clearly and appropriately.

I'm always asking myself if I'm being clear when training, with reinforcement, rewards, and corrections. I don't think *I'd be clear at all if sometimes I was growling, flipping, or sitting, on my dog....I don't know...it just isn't for me. There are so many minute signals, gestures, etc...that dogs give off to show dominance, that are "corrected" by the dog pack leader in the wild. I just don't think *most people can catch them all, and send clear messages. I would rather use nilf, obedience, and proper exposure to different environments, than trying to communicate via growling, flipping etc.....I know it works for some people, but I personally, don't trust myself to do it correctly or not confuse the heck out of my dogs lol.
 

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Love her! This is so true:

With all the progress we’ve made culturally, how is it possible that so many people are still stuck in the old school mentality where everything from jumping up to pulling on leash is seen as a canine bid to overthrow the kingdom? We don’t believe that a child who pulls at his mother’s arm repeatedly for attention or destroys something of value is trying to be dominant, nor do we advise those parents to use physical force or scare the pants off the kid to prove who’s boss. So why do we continue to do this with dogs? Dogs are not children, (though they are like children to many of us), but the psychology is the same. Just like kids, in most cases rude canine behavior stems not from a desire to be in charge, but from an emotional state such as anxiety or overexcitement, a lack of knowing what’s expected, or not having been appropriately trained.
And this:

The dominance issue is not only a matter of faulty philosophy, but a lack of basic understanding of canine communiation. Consider this scenario: A dog is chewing on something his owner considers valuable. The owner yells at the dog and hits him on the rump. The dog, frightened, growls a warning. The growl is viewed as insubordination. The person, now outraged, shakes the dog by his scruff. The dog, feeling trapped and frightened, becomes even more defensive. At this point some dogs will “submit” but others, in a state of high emotional arousal, will bite. Escalating a physical confrontation with a dog, or starting one in the first place, is such a ridiculous way to establish leadership that if it weren’t so widespread, it would be laughable.
 
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