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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

Well, Maximus has been home for 5 days now, he was 8 weeks old yesterday. I wanted to spend 5 minutes here and there throughout the day teaching him to sit. When I use treats, he stays engaged for 2 minutes or so and then loses interest in the treats. I've tried several different types, even home made liver treats (which I don't want to give him too much of) and nothing keeps him engaged.

He has a HIGH prey drive, but all the prepping I did was on how to treat with a food drive, which his doesn't seem to be too high. I've tried trianing before feeding time, so he would be hungry, doesn't make a difference. I'd love to be able to food train, as all the research i've done, was based on it, assuming all pups have a food drive.

So... any thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
 

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The fecal test didn't show worms... but he is on anti-biotics for Gar and Coc. He has not problem eating his raw meals :) He loves those. I have all the flavors of Zukes and Pet Botanic's treats. And again, he enjoys them, but loses interested.

If I get one of his squeeky toys, rags, pull rags, etc... he'll go nuts for that as long as I play with him.

He doesn't seem sick at all, he's a very hyper, high drive pup... just for toys though.
 

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Take it slow. At 8 weeks his training activities should not be more than two min anyway. Trust me, that pup will way up one day!
 

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Him playing with you doesn't necessarily mean high prey drive. It just means he likes to play.

Find a treat...or a human food...that the dog goes bonkers for. Each one of our dogs has something they really really love no matter what their level of food drive. If I really want my boy's attention...I use semi-frozen pieces of raw meat, cheese, or some sort of turkey/ham. Dog treats don't always do it for him as he gets those all the time anyways.

2 minutes sounds just about right for the attention span of a puppy. My dog is 2.5 years old and he wouldn't like me to train him the same exercise (especially one as boring as sit) for 5 minutes either and would get bored really fast. Keep training sessions really really short. 3 sits, 3 downs, 3 paws, and you're done. None of the sit...stand...sit...stand...sit...stand for any extended period of time.

Trust me...your dog will learn the commands...but if you make it boring from the beginning, he's not going to want to do them with any kind of speed or accuracy later on.
 

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Thanks, I tried to make them fun and only worked on sit. I doubt it was 5 minutes, closer to 2-3 before he lost interest, so that's when I stopped :) I let him chase me around, treat in hand and when he got close, I stopped, he wanted the treat in my closedhand and said sit. When he sat, he got the treat.

martemchik, I could be wrong, but Max has two toys that if you ran them around the ground, he would chase them until he passed out. (not that I ever let it get that far) One is a grey squirrel looking thing with a squeeker in the tale and the other being his flirt pole. He plays, but when he's chasing his squirel or flirt pole, it's a different pup... total land shark and concentration on the object.
 

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Hi all,

Well, Maximus has been home for 5 days now, he was 8 weeks old yesterday. I wanted to spend 5 minutes here and there throughout the day teaching him to sit. When I use treats, he stays engaged for 2 minutes or so and then loses interest in the treats. I've tried several different types, even home made liver treats (which I don't want to give him too much of) and nothing keeps him engaged.

He has a HIGH prey drive, but all the prepping I did was on how to treat with a food drive, which his doesn't seem to be too high. I've tried trianing before feeding time, so he would be hungry, doesn't make a difference. I'd love to be able to food train, as all the research i've done, was based on it, assuming all pups have a food drive.

So... any thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.


My dog also has low food drive but high prey drive. He absolutely loves any type of squeaky stuffed animal toy, so what I've done is I've bought a couple of small'ish squeaker toys, and I use those as the "reward". They have to be small enough that you can ball them up in your hand so your pup can't get to them. Then you make him do whatever command you're asking, and once he's done it correctly, toss him the toy! When you get to the point of foosing or other long-duration commands, it's no different. The toy just becomes the reward instead of food.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Vickip. That's sort of what I was guessing... I'll have to go out and find some toys small enough that I can ball up in my hand.

He may have a higher food drive than I thought. I bought a bunch of Zukes treats and botanicals, which he will eat, but doesn't go nuts over like his toys. But I had some sirloin that I cut up and froze a while back for treats and I tried that and he really liked them.

I think since he's eating RAW, the treats are going to have to be really tempting to him.

I'll try both small toys and high quality (beef) treats for him and see how that goes.
 

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Use a toy. Build the value of a reward coming from you and it will build the food drive.
 

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At 8 weeks old don't expect more than 2-3 minutes. They are babies. Keep it short and fun and stop before he does. That will make him want to engage more. Also you can build food drive a little by first making the puppy "drive" for the food. Also do it multiple times a day when you know he's hungry. It's much easier timing wise to use treats at this age than a toy.
 

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Mog, my dog Liesl is like this, also. As Vic said, you can train with a toy and tap that drive rather than food. In my experience you dont need a toy that can be hidden in your hand--I wave it in Liesl's face so she knows what the reward is, and she get's VERY focused at that point.

Get her attention with the toy, and then make her do her task. Reward by giving her the toy. Only give it for a few seconds--leave them wanting more! Gradually start giving the toy only after she "chains" commands (sit, stay, walk away from her, then come=gets toy). Dont forget to occasionally let her play with it with you for a few seconds, so she gets that great feeling from catching and shaking that prey, then start the process over again.

One great think about this is that you don't have to refrigerate toys or wipe the chicken fat off your fingers.:)
 
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