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Discussion Starter #1
I should have searched for this before posting because I am sure I am not the only one with a dog that chases his tail. I am not sure how to get him to stop, or why he does it. He is very fast at it though I tell ya. It makes me dizzy just watching him. Because of his spinning as I call it, he has hurt his paw 3 times now. Soft tissue injuries. In order to get him to stop I have to yell at him....(2 minutes later you will hear me say sorry though. I can't stay mad at him)this does stop him for about 5 minutes. I am wondering if it is because he was taken so young from his parents. Any thoughts. ???
 

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I would stop him as soon as he starts, and give him something to do. Redirect with a toy, or even a walk. Change his focus, good that he's slowed down doing it as much. Don't yell at him, give him a command, sit, stay, place use different ones to keep his attention.
 

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All I can think of is to distract him with a command, toy or treat.

I've seen other dogs do this but luckily Mei has never done it. If she did I would just think its funny and let her play but getting an injury sucks.

Good luck!
 

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This is a dry read (pour yourself some extra coffee) but it covers a lot -

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3406045/

We found that gender, amount of exercise, amount of activities, time spent alone, age of arrival to the household, number of adults in the household, number of diagnosed diseases, type of food, or birth place were not associated with TC in any of the analyses in a pooled sample or a breed-specific analysis (data not shown), and these same factors were dropped from the final models (data not shown).
Finally, we performed the same analyses described above using the pooled data (all breeds) including only the most severe tail chasers (TCindex 5–12; tail chasing is ‘frequent’ to ‘multiple times per day’) and the controls. In this analysis, dietary supplements (x21,185 = 11.32, p<0.001), the amount of conspecifics at home (x21,185 = 9.63, p = 0.002) and sterilization (x21,185 = 6.05, p = 0.014) were the only TC-associated factors (generalized linear model, binomial distribution).

The effect of maternal care and age of separation (from the mother) on TC was also evaluated using a generalized linear model with a binomial distribution. Tail chasers had experienced lower quality care (χ2 1, 74 = 5.64, p = 0.018, all breeds pooled) and were separated earlier from their mothers (χ2 1, 74 = 4.40, p = 0.036) compared to dogs with no tail chasing. TC dogs had been separated from their mothers on average at 7 weeks of age, whereas in the control group the average age of separation was 8 weeks. There were no differences between females or males or between breeds (data not shown). When only the most severe cases (TCindex 5–12, n = 16) were compared with the controls, the only notable difference was a trend towards decreased maternal care between severely affected TC cases and controls (n = 32) (χ2 1, 48 = 3.17, p = 0.075).
It goes into which nutritional supplements made a difference, etc.
 

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Samson Chase's his tail from time to time. It typically happens when we've had several days of rain and outdoor activity has been more limited. It's nothing I'm concerned about, but it is notable that they found shy dogs were more prone to this and Samson is a bit on the shy side. He came home at 9 weeks and had very good maternal care, so none of that applies.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
How old was he and how long has it been going on ?: Since we brought him home. He was very young when he left his parents and siblings.


I could set up a camera but I already know he does it in his cage at times. The wife and I work every day. He has to be kenneled at least for part of it and I have heard him doing it in there. He settles pretty quick though in his cage.


He doesn't get hurt any more doing it. Which is great cause I can't stand him looking hurt.



Maybe he needs some sort of suppliment. Open to ideas.
 

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Vitamin C and other micro and macro nutrients were mentioned in the article.. I would get something like C-complex from Springtime Inc and add it to his feed. The c complex is mixed with bee pollen which is really awesome stuff with tons of nutrients
 

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Yes they are a good company with tons of research and the links to them on the site.. Buy one get one free too.. Great company
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Well, just a small update. He is still chasing his tail but not near as bad. I guess he just had to grow up a bit. He still does it when over excited but that's ok if it's handled right, lol. Now it's more his barking but That's getting better as well.
 

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The OP has not been active in a year.
 
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