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This thread is dedicated to those volunteers who would like to transport but have LOTS of questions!

Please jot down your favorite tips for the beginner, or seasoned veteran, and I'll add it to this comprehensive list!


When transporting a pupper, make sure you have all of the applicable papers such as proof of rabies, surrender forms, adoption papers, health certificate, health records, etc. - Cid
(Jackie Comment: and REMEMBERING to PASS ON the papers!)
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Bring along a leash for each pupper! And if you are first on the list, you might want to bring a collar too in case they arrive without one. - Cid
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Water (for the pups) the last transport I did no one sent water. Oh and ADVIL for the coordinator -LaurieB
(Cid comment: And a bowl! You might want to consider a disposable bowl to eliminate any chance that your pack could encounter germs from the bowl)
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You'll want to have handy some dog biscuits to "make friends." - Zee's Mom
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I also like to take a tasty chew toy of some sort for the nervous types. No rawhide, please! - Zee's Mom
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Usually I have a companion ride with me to keep an eye on the pup(s) since I can't accomodate a crate, but I did invest in a dog harness for times when I travel by myself with a dog. It's easy to put on them, and they can lay down (at least in my car) even with it on. - Zee's Mom
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Fill your gas tank before you get started that day. You may think you have time while en route, but if the leg ahead of you runs late, you'll be trying to make up time. - Zee's Mom
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If I have been fostering the dog, I pass on at least a few days' supply of the food I've been feeding to ease with transition at the new home. - Zee's Mom
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If you run late, please, please, call the next leg and the transport coordinator and let them know. I waited 30 minutes one time for a leg before calling to see if she was okay, and found out she was another 10 minutes away! -Zee's Mom
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Cut off the puppers food intake the night before and do not feed the morning of the transport. Too much excitement with a full colon does not make for a happy transport! -Cid
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I keep a bag in my car loaded with transport gear. I highly recommend a roll of paper towels for yack attacks and other unfortunate incidents. I would also recommend handy wipes for freshening up after a transport as we are sometimes involved in those unfortunate incidents. -Cid
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Pick a meeting place that is both well traveled, yet has remote locations for walking dogs and doggie nature business. Rest areas are good, or restaurants with truck parking like Cracker Barrel. Park away from the road, and away from people. People WILL try to pet the dog, so eliminate that opportunity. These dogs will be wound up and excited due to the transport, and you simply do not know what the dog will do. Keep the dog safe, yourself safe and innocent bystanders safe by keeping the dog to itself. -Cid
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I have a special transport backpack ready to go at all times. It has a leash & collar, some treats, a pair of stainless steel bowls, extra poo-bags and a brush. Then all I have to add to get out the door is a bottle of water and some kibble for just in case. And the digicam, Daddy and I like to take a snap of our guest. - Sandra902 (Sandy the Poo Lady)
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Daddy drives and Mommy spoils. - Sandra902
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I check in with the transport coordinator as I'm leaving the house. I also check in with the person I'm meeting on each end at this time as well. That way people can coordinate their departure and arrival a little more closely. I also check in with the person as I'm nearing each handoff place. And I let the transport coordinator know when I've picked up and dropped off. It's a lot of phone calls but what if there were an accident or something? I've read about a lot of crazy little things that can delay a handoff and raise people's anxiety levels. So I try to take that extra few minutes and keep everyone posted as to what-where-when. - Sandra902
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This may seem really obvious, but everyone needs to have a cell. I recently did a transport where there was a major problem with the leg ahead of me. The person with the dog didn't have a cell. There was a miscommunication somewhere about the meeting location, so both transporters ended up at different gas stations in the same town. For TWO HOURS!!! The person with the dog found a pay phone but didn't have the cell number of the person she was supposed to meet. No one knew where the dog was all this time. It eventually worked out but......ARGHHHHHHHH!! - agilegsds
(Cid Note: If you don't have a cell phone, or can't borrow one, buy an inexpensive phone card to use at a pay phone!)
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Believe it or not.... I keep a few saltines in the car for upset tummies (just a few as to not overdo the salt). - gsd1234
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If using your own crate for the transport, consider sanitizing it when returning home. I use the ol' Clorox wash. Also wash/sanitize any towels, bedding, bowls. Kill those germs and keep them from your own pack! - Cid
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I like to put a tarp under the crate (especially with pups) in case someone vomits or defecates through the crate. This will cut down on the chance that parvo, distemper, etc. gets embedded into your car carpeting. - Tracy
 

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I'm SO glad you had this idea Cid. I've never transported but yes, do have questions. I hope you get a lot of responses because if the opportunity ever comes along I would really LOVE to help!
 

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Re: Survial Guide and Tips for the Transport Angels! *DELETED* *DELETED*

Post deleted by Jacqui
 

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As usual, Cid (and Moongazr) step up to the task!

Let's see, how about REMEMBERING to PASS ON the papers...


I like to take along a bottle of water and a bowl as these pups get thirsty traveling.

You'll want to have handy some dog biscuits to "make friends."

I also like to take a tasty chew toy of some sort for the nervous types. No rawhide, please!

Usually I have a companion ride with me to keep an eye on the pup(s) since I can't accomodate a crate, but I did invest in a dog harness for times when I travel by myself with a dog. It's easy to put on them, and they can lay down (at least in my car) even with it on.

Fill your gas tank before you get started that day. You may think you have time while en route, but if the leg ahead of you runs late, you'll be trying to make up time.

If I have been fostering the dog, I pass on at least a few days' supply of the food I've been feeding to ease with transition at the new home.

If you run late, please, please, call the next leg and the transport coordinator and let them know. I waited 30 minutes one time for a leg before calling to see if she was okay, and found out she was another 10 minutes away!

That's it for now. I'm sure I'll think of some more later!
 

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Originally posted by LaurieB:
Oh and ADVIL for the coordinator
<font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial">I SECOND THAT!



By the way, Laurie, how IS that transport of yours coming...?
 

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i have a special transport backpack ready to go at all times. it has a leash & collar, some treats, a pair of stainless steel bowls, extra poo-bags (yep it's me, sandra the poo lady), and a brush.

then all i have to add to get out the door is a bottle of water and some kibble for just in case.
and the digicam, daddy and i like to take a snap of our guest.

good idea about the wipes! i'll toss those in the backpack as well. 99 cents of utility there!

daddy drives and mommy spoils.

oh and one more thing...i check in with the transport coordinator as i'm leaving the house. i also check in with the person i'm meeting on each end at this time as well. that way people can coordinate their departure and arrival a little more closely. i also check in with the person as i'm nearing each handoff place. and i let the transport coordinator know when i've picked up and dropped off.

it's a lot of phone calls but what if there were an accident or something? i've read about a lot of crazy little things that can delay a handoff and raise people's anxiety levels. so i try to take that extra few minutes and keep everyone posted as to what-where-when.

[ February 15, 2004, 08:31 AM: Message edited by: sandra902 ]
 

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This may seem really obvious, but everyone needs to have a cell. I recently did a transport where there was a major problem with the leg ahead of me. The person with the dog didn't have a cell. There was a miscommunication somewhere about the meeting location, so both transporters ended up at different gas stations in the same town. For TWO HOURS!!! The person with the dog found a pay phone but didn't have the cell number of the person she was supposed to meet. No one knew where the dog was all this time. It eventually worked out but......ARGHHHHHHHH!!
 

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believe it or not.... I keep a few saltines in the car for upset tummies (just a few as to not overdo the salt).
I have a tape/cd of mellow music in case you hit a stretch of a no-music area - helps to calm doggies too!
give your vehicle a quick check - water, oil, tires.
 
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Re: Survial Guide and Tips for the Transport Angels! *DELETED*

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I like to put a tarp under the crate (especially with pups) in case someone vomits or defecates through the crate. This will cut down on the chance that parvo, distemper, etc. gets embedded into your car carpeting.
 

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Re: Survial Guide and Tips for the Transport Angel

Bumping this up.
 

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Re: Survial Guide and Tips for the Transport Angel

Always print out the run sheet with dogs listed and MOST IMPORTANT - names and cell numbers of the legs before and after yours. You WILL need them. Arrange meeting places ahead of time and try to scope them out if you can. We found the McDonald's was an urban one with no parking. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/twitch.gif Fortunately there was a little park in the next block.

Find out EXACTLY how many dogs in the transport. I signed on for 2, was told it was 4 and 5 + a crate of puppies arrived! If we had not called the leg ahead just to check in we would have been in deep doggy doo. As it was we needed to take both cars.

Pack everything you think you could possibly need and then some. ALWAYS pack chocolate -- for the driver. Take two Excedrin followed by a Hershey bar and hit the road... /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/rotflmao.gif

Peace,
Jane
 

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Re: Survial Guide and Tips for the Transport Angel

Exact directions.
Maps.

Driving tip (not everyone knows this) if driving in rain or snowy roads DO NOT use cruise control. If you hydroplane or hit ice you need to let off the gas and with cruise you can't - it ends up increasing your speed towards an accident.

A slip collar or leash that can be fashioned to one...it helped with a transport that the dog tried slipping his collar off...once he saw he couldn't get the collar off he was fine. Chasing a loose unfamilar sometimes scared dog is not fun. /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/02_frown.gif
 

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Re: Survial Guide and Tips for the Transport Angel

[I posted this last year after I did my first transport. Very nice for anyone traveling the I-75 corridor]

I just found this site when looking for a meeting site for a transport in Kentucky.

This site is a listing of every exit on I-75 organized by state. It lists each exit and what ammenities there are off the exit (restaurants, hotels, gas stations, etc).

http://www.i75exitguide.com/index.htm
 

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Cell phones are a MUST but more than that...CHARGE THEM AND TURN THEM ON! Or bring a charger that plugs into the cig lighter. I have a transport this weekend and one of the drivers doesn't have a cell...<argh>.

Know your state's (county etc.) law on driving while talking on cells. In CT you will be ticketed if caught talking on a cell unless it's a handless device. (I learned this as a driver told me (on the cell) as a cop passed by
)

Know your state's (county etc) law on dogs with heads out the window. I don't think I need to say that NO dog should have their head out the window since we are all driving highways, but if they are, you can be ticketed depending on laws for restraint.

Do NOT post meeting locations or any personal info on public boards (including this one)!! Only coordinators and drivers should know meeting locations and vehicle info via private emails. While transferring dogs, drivers are very vulnerable as all our attention are on the dogs and not so much what is going on around us. I do keep an eye to make certain people don't approach the dogs, but not so much on my vehicle. Keep wallets and purses in a safe place.

When leaving your vehicle KEEP YOUR KEYS ON YOU and NOT in the car. I was coordinating a transport where the driver got locked out of her vehicle when the dog stepped on the button. Thank goodness the windows were slightly down or it could have turned bad as it was during the summer.

I'm sure there are other things I've come across but nothing more comes to mind right now or have already been mentioned.
 

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Originally Posted By: NWS_HavenI like to put a tarp under the crate (especially with pups) in case someone vomits or defecates through the crate. This will cut down on the chance that parvo, distemper, etc. gets embedded into your car carpeting.
AWESOME IDEA-
I used to use just a blanket//large towel- this is way better ....no permeation!!!!!!!!!
 
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