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Discussion Starter #21
A leather lead. When he starts pulling change directions often it helps him he will now then need to focus on you. So many YouTube videos out there. Stoney Dennis is great. “Leave it” a great think to teach starting as pups there are many leave it videos. Max was a little pup and liked to chase cars the leave it command is what stopped it. First learned with minimal distractions a great thing to teach. This is a great for your son it may help him muster up some motivation taking caring of a living animal. Hind and seek games are fun. First hiding treats in the house and tell your pup to find and then toys, and people and doing this outdoors. Keeps everyone busy important to keep their minds busy. A lot of trick videos out there to learn and so for fun your son can make his own videos post them on tic toc. Set up some agility course in the backyard. A little baby pool to splash around in when it gets hot.
Thanks I have watched a lot of videos and still watch them he was doing so well and now has started pulling again so much different advice when it comes to leads
 

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Thanks I have watched a lot of videos and still watch them he was doing so well and now has started pulling again so much different advice when it comes to leads
I think consistency is key. I know I have bad days and good day with my dog. Some days he listens to everything, and some days he’s very mischievous. Keep doing the abrupt turns and leave it commands to get him to stop pulling. Once my dog knew some leash etiquette, I taught him to stay at my side and to stop forging ahead. I would tell him to heel and walk. If he tried to forge ahead, I would very gently pull on the leash and say “hey, heel.” Hey is a softer correction word I use while playing. Once he stopped forging ahead and heeled, I would treat him. I only started doing this when he understood leash pressure very well and our communication on walks was built up.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
I think consistency is key. I know I have bad days and good day with my dog. Some days he listens to everything, and some days he’s very mischievous. Keep doing the abrupt turns and leave it commands to get him to stop pulling. Once my dog knew some leash etiquette, I taught him to stay at my side and to stop forging ahead. I would tell him to heel and walk. If he tried to forge ahead, I would very gently pull on the leash and say “hey, heel.” Hey is a softer correction word I use while playing. Once he stopped forging ahead and heeled, I would treat him. I only started doing this when he understood leash pressure very well and our communication on walks was built up.
Sounds good he also still nips at my legs this morning it was my behind pulling at my rain jacket! How can I keep him more entertained during the day I have a yard but when it’s raining it’s so difficult
 

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Also when I started heeling on walks, we would only heel a short bit. I would tell him to heel and keep him in a heel for 10-15 feet. Then I would give my release command “okay.” He could then sniff around and mark out of the heel. Then I would tell him to get back into a heel and keep repeating that process. I like the balanced approach; it made him know he got freedom on some parts of the walk.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Also when I started heeling on walks, we would only heel a short bit. I would tell him to heel and keep him in a heel for 10-15 feet. Then I would give my release command “okay.” He could then sniff around and mark out of the heel. Then I would tell him to get back into a heel and keep repeating that process. I like the balanced approach; it made him know he got freedom on some parts of the walk.
I’ve been watching a lot of videos on you tube and it says that 5 month old Gsds shouldn’t get too much exercise they should only get 2 15 minute walks a day it’s not good for there legs to run around too much what do you guys think about this ?
Thanks
 

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I’ve been watching a lot of videos on you tube and it says that 5 month old Gsds shouldn’t get too much exercise they should only get 2 15 minute walks a day it’s not good for there legs to run around too much what do you guys think about this ?
Thanks
I agree, growing dogs should not be doing extended walks/runs on hard pavement. Their growth plates need to fuse. But they need more exercise than that. Some running/play in a field/backyard and a couple training sessions added is perfect in my opinion.
 

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Sounds good he also still nips at my legs this morning it was my behind pulling at my rain jacket! How can I keep him more entertained during the day I have a yard but when it’s raining it’s so difficult
Try and redirect his nipping behavior with a toy he likes. I’m a bit new to shepherds so I’m not sure I’m the best person to answer this. My dog used to attack my ankles when he was a puppy. I redirected the behavior with sticks and toys. I think it phased out because I taught him bite inhibition during our play sessions.

Your dog is entering adolescence, and a different method may be more effective. I think someone more experienced should answer this or you could contact a trainer.
 

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Daily walks should be semi structured. I tell my dog to heel for a bit the I say "okay!" which he knows is a cue to leave my side and sniff around and mark. More important than heeling is teaching your dog leash pressure. He needs to know that pulling is not tolerated. Whenever he pulls, walk the opposite direction. Never walk towards something that he is pulling towards. Just do a 180 and your dog will follow. My dog still pulls from time to time. When he does I give him a gentle reminder and say "no pulling" with a very light leash pop.

I don't think heeling is very important for walks. GSDs want to check everything out. So, its very hard for them to stay by your side on a daily lackadaisical walk. Start with a heel for a few feet and then release him for a minute or two and then repeat. Also, try to get him to focus on you during the walk. Bring some treats with you and pepper in obedience commands. When my dog was young, like yours, I also gave him praise and treats when he made eye contact with me. Don't expect too much from him at 6 months but really work on leash pressure. Never reinforce his pulling and reward him like crazy when he does behavior you want. GSDs are very smart and he will start to understand.
Over the past couple of months, Ole and I have found these semi structured walk work best. We practice heeling and the beginning and end of each walk for a little bit of work on focus. The rest of the walk is more exploring "sniff and mark' and Paul puts it. Pup is free to wander anywhere within the radius of his leash As long as he doesn't pull. To keep things interesting we switch between 6', 8', and 20' leads so pup gets used to having different amounts of freedom. If pup puts anything more than slight pressure on the lead I stop dead in my tracks until he totally releases pressure and takes a step back toward me. I want him to know that the human makes the final decision on where we go.

To be honest, it can be exhausting and frustrating the first couple of weeks. Sometimes, if pup was in a mood, we spent more time standing still than moving.

Nice leather leads are great on the hands. Since my pup still likes to take a nibble on his leash when he thinks no one will notice, we use some medium grade nylon leashes from a farm supply store.
 

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My boy is a land shark:)

Early on we spent a lot of time chasing puppy tugs, balls, and flirt poles. It took a little while but before long, pup realized that he if chases the 'right things' we could have a fun game.

At first, we did a lot of redirection. I always had a pocket full of chew toys to redirect pup whenever he even looked at something off-limits.

As he got the hang of what were his toys and what was off-limits. I added a verbal 'nope' to help clarify what was on and off-limits for him.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
Hi so this morning we just went for a short walk focusing on his walking still barking and lunging at cyclists 🙄 I bought a 6ft tie out lead and have it in my front room at least he can’t run around the house not sure how it will go first trial today all calm for now until Gucci my other dog wakes up !
 

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Baby gates can work really well for keeping your puppy limited to one room in the house.

Dogs, especially GSDs, can seem weird. They seem to take the notion that if something is weird or unusual they bark at it. I suppose that is what they were bred to do. Normal stuff they can take care of themselves. Weird stuff they wake up the shepherd :)

Cyclists can seem weird because they go so much faster than normal people walking. It might take a while for pup to get used to the cyclist. It can help to reward pup with treats as he sees these new things so he can form a positive association.

My pup still takes a second, and third, glance at kids on scooters. Since the lockdown, several neighborhood kids have gotten electric scooter. Pup finds it unusual that the electric scooters move so fast and quietly.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
Thanks for replying I don’t have a spare room I can put him in so I put him in his crate after a good play not sure how long is fair to leave him in the crate I feel guilty putting him in there but if I don’t he will drive me up the wall
 

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A crate is your, and your new pup's, best training tool.

The key is to think of the crate as his safe and comfortable 'den' rather than a place of punishment. If introduced correctly, dogs love their crate... plus it keeps him out of trouble for a while. Sometimes if things get overwhelming for pup around the house, my pup goes into his crate just to hang out.

It is healthy for a pup to spend a lot his time sleeping. They are perfectly content to spend their sleeping time crated. Over the course of a few days, you will figure out a schedule that works for you.

It is basically going to be potty, play, sleep, over and over for the next couple of months:)
 

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Discussion Starter #36
A crate is your, and your new pup's, best training tool.

The key is to think of the crate as his safe and comfortable 'den' rather than a place of punishment. If introduced correctly, dogs love their crate... plus it keeps him out of trouble for a while. Sometimes if things get overwhelming for pup around the house, my pup goes into his crate just to hang out.

It is healthy for a pup to spend a lot his time sleeping. They are perfectly content to spend their sleeping time crated. Over the course of a few days, you will figure out a schedule that works for you.

It is basically going to be potty, play, sleep, over and over for the next couple of months:)
Yes he sleeps when he is in his crate it just
A crate is your, and your new pup's, best training tool.

The key is to think of the crate as his safe and comfortable 'den' rather than a place of punishment. If introduced correctly, dogs love their crate... plus it keeps him out of trouble for a while. Sometimes if things get overwhelming for pup around the house, my pup goes into his crate just to hang out.

It is healthy for a pup to spend a lot his time sleeping. They are perfectly content to spend their sleeping time crated. Over the course of a few days, you will figure out a schedule that works for you.

It is basically going to be potty, play, sleep, over and over for the next couple of months:)
Hi thanks for your encouragement it helps to have u guys to chat to this morning went well I’ve realised less is better short walk with lots of correction and lots of treats still tackling runners and cyclists I hope he stops soon i can’t get him to focus on me and his pull is getting stronger also he bit my son quite hard yesterday I know it’s play but it hurts He loves to try and play bite with my son mostly 😔
 

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Is there any particular type of leash there are quite a few options on line ?
The type of leash is not as important as what or who is on end of it. GSDs number in the thousands because of Back yard breeders or accidents. That cute little puppy with proper training may turn out fine or be your worst nightmare. The personality of the owner contributes to how they turn out and not everyone that brings home that cute little puppy is a match. When someone has an older pup to sell or get rid of, they have often already instilled some bad habits into that dogs personality. Can they be corrected? Maybe - maybe not. A GSD rescue as Car2ner suggested sounds like the best action.
 

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My favorite long line: 30’ long, lightweight and made of some thick slippery synthetic which is hard to knot or tangle, bright orange so easy to see in grass.

(My dog is a very good dog but is half husky...I was told never to let him totally offleash. He doesn’t mind trailing the line. Sometimes it gets caught on rock or tree,then I have to untangle him.)
 
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