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Hi guys!

I’m hoping someone here can give me some helpful advice. I have a 1 year & 1 month old GSD who will not break the submissive urination habit. And quite frankly it is progressing much worse, especially if he gets in trouble. To the point where I can’t even tell him “no” or ask him to sit without urinating.
I’ve tried multiple methods To build his confidence, but nothing works. If anyone has any ideas or advice it would be much appreciated. Our house seems to smell like urine 24/7.
Thanks so much
 

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Hi, this is not something I have personally dealt with. However, maybe more information would also be helpful. What sort of things are you telling him no for? What is his daily routine? What things have you tried to build his confidence?
 

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My boy Hans will be eight on Wednesday, and he still does it with non-family members, so there is a chance he may never grow out of it.
 

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Of
Hi, this is not something I have personally dealt with. However, maybe more information would also be helpful. What sort of things are you telling him no for? What is his daily routine? What things have you tried to build his confidence?
Of course! He is a chewer so anytime he chews something other than his toys i bring it to his attention, or another example is when he’s eyeballing some people food. He is so smart and such really great dog I don’t ever have too many problems with him. As far as building his confidence goes, I’ve tried distracting him by using commands he knows well and rewarding (that seemed to work a little bit), I’ve tried staying down on his level so he doesn’t feel like I’m looming over him, neck and chest scratches instead of head pets, and some good playtime methods for positive reinforcement
 

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Have you tried using a pen / baby gates etc to keep him contained in a particular area? For example, an area where he does not have things that he can chew on, an area that is quieter or where he might feel more comfortable (I don't know all his triggers). Or maybe you could just take whatever he is chewing out of his mouth, rather than a correction. You say "eyeballing" food? Do you mean just looking at it? I would say that wouldn't need a correction personally. If you mean he jumps up and attempts to steal the food, perhaps you need to put him in a separate area before the food comes out. I wouldn't set him up to fail.

Do you have a fenced in yard, or how do you exercise him? Again, there is so many variables that I don't know about your routine and lifestyle, but I'm sure there are things that could be changed as difficult as it might seem. Behavior modification can sometimes be a slow journey. Don't lose hope! If it never goes away completely, maybe you will just have to learn how to live with it in a way that doesn't get you frustrated with your dog. I have puppies and un-spayed female dogs etc in and out of my house a lot, so I deliberately put in tile flooring in my downstairs area so it doesn't cause me a headache when I have blood, pee, mud etc everywhere. Some people might think that's crazy, but I think they are worth the hassle!
 

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I adopted an adult male that submissive peed the first 6 months. It was a pain because I can't raise my voice, stare too hard, walk towards him too fast, tell him "no", or reach for him too fast. He just rolled over and peed. So, we just don't do any of those things but rather I distract, I use the leash when possible (to guide him away), I walk towards him slowly while avoiding eye contact so he doesn't misunderstand and we focus on building our relationship. Thankfully, he is not by nature an overly submissive dog because after 6 months, he grew a big head, runs away from me when he knows he did something wrong and do the "catch me if you can" dance with me... bounces far away enough out of reach while staring at me like "Haha, can't get me." Since then, I can scream, run towards him, correct him, and it's no longer an issue. If anything, he needs to be toned down now, very very wild at times. I call him my feral dog.
 
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