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Since Fritz has been with us at 8 weeks old he has submissive peed and excitement peed. Now at 8 months his peeing has gotten worse and he cowers and runs to his crate. A couple of weeks ago he was laying in the kitchen when a friend arrived and he jumped up and ran at him barking. I grabbed him with an emphatic no and commanded him to lay. He peed all over the rug. That night I brought him out to pee his last time and after that I asked him to sit and for a paw and he peed on my hand. The next day I caught him peeing on the lawn (trained not to) and I yelled no and ran at him because he wasn't stopping and he ran,cowered,and hid. Now he cowers from both my wife and I and pees if we try to give him affection. It's as if he's terrified of us. Help!!
 

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Since Fritz has been with us at 8 weeks old he has submissive peed and excitement peed. Now at 8 months his peeing has gotten worse and he cowers and runs to his crate. A couple of weeks ago he was laying in the kitchen when a friend arrived and he jumped up and ran at him barking. I grabbed him with an emphatic no and commanded him to lay. He peed all over the rug. That night I brought him out to pee his last time and after that I asked him to sit and for a paw and he peed on my hand. The next day I caught him peeing on the lawn (trained not to) and I yelled no and ran at him because he wasn't stopping and he ran,cowered,and hid. Now he cowers from both my wife and I and pees if we try to give him affection. It's as if he's terrified of us. Help!!
Your tone and the way you run at him is probably freaking him out. You might be too rough on him. You dont need to yell and be forceful to make your dog do things. A dog that pees and acts like that IMO is a dog that is afraid of his owners and lacks confidence. Poor guy :(

My friend did that to their dog and now all he is is a big scardy cat and acts as if he was abused :mad:
 

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Your tone and the way you run at him is probably freaking him out. You might be too rough on him. You dont need to yell and be forceful to make your dog do things. A dog that pees and acts like that IMO is a dog that is afraid of his owners and lacks confidence. Poor guy :(

My friend did that to their dog and now all he is is a big scardy cat and acts as if he was abused :mad:
He's acting terrified but my wife has never corrected him and neither has the neighbor who he peed in front of when he was asked for his paw. BTW,the dog was ran towards once by me,not regularly and is now basically uncorrectable. Looking for solutions.
 

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The next day I caught him peeing on the lawn (trained not to) and I yelled no and ran at him because he wasn't stopping and he ran,cowered,and hid. Now he cowers from both my wife and I and pees if we try to give him affection. It's as if he's terrified of us. Help!!
Why isn't he allowed to pee on the lawn?
Where would you like for him to pee?
 

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Why isn't he allowed to pee on the lawn?
Where would you like for him to pee?
He is trained to pee on the yard perimeter just like the adult GSD but sometimes gets lazy. He can't pee on the lawn because I don't want him to pee on the lawn. If this is all you have please move on,really,I'm looking for solutions. Do you have any professional or personal experience?
 

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He's acting terrified but my wife has never corrected him and neither has the neighbor who he peed in front of when he was asked for his paw. Looking for solutions.
If you change your tone and give him lots of positive feedback his attitude could change. I am trying to help. When he does something wrong do not yell at him, correct him in another manner. An example: your dog is getting too rough with you, like biting, try to give him a toy to bite instead, if that doesn't work you can ignore him and not play with him, if that doesn't work you can put him in his crate for a time out. Even though they make us angry and frustrated we should not raise our voices at them or be forceful.
 

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I think, first, stop all the "no"s and yelling at him. If Frtiz is this way right now, I would put all the obedience stuff to the side and just work on bonding and building his confidence via lots of interactive games like tugging and fetching (if he will bring the ball back). I know you walk Fritz a lot. My advice is to cut back on the miles and miles of walking and just play games with him for awhile.

Also if you know he is uncomfortable with strangers, then if possible I would remove him from any situation where you think he is going to act badly. Put him in the crate or outside. Anytime a dog is uncomfortable about something, you have to approach very slowly and gradually, inch by inch. Some people advocate "flooding" the dog and basically asking him to "get over it" or use the occasion to "teach" the dog to behave. I don't agree with that at all.
 

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If you change your tone and give him lots of positive feedback his attitude could change. I am trying to help. When he does something wrong do not yell at him, correct him in another manner. An example: your dog is getting too rough with you, like biting, try to give him a toy to bite instead, if that doesn't work you can ignore him and not play with him, if that doesn't work you can put him in his crate for a time out. Even though they make us angry and frustrated we should not raise our voices at them or be forceful.
This is my 5th GSD and the first one to ever react this way to normal correction-pretty pathetic. I've contacted a local trainer who evaluated the pup 3 months ago.
 

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I think you'll have to completely change your approach and interacitons with Fritz to build his confidence back up. Since he has been submissive and shy from the time he was a puppy, he very much needs gentle, patient direction and management to do well, and no corrections. To me, this is a dog that is confused and terriefied, and does not understand why you are acting the way you are - somewhere there has been a huge breakdown in communications, which is only confusing Fritz more, and making you more frustrated.

Fritz is Fritz, and his temperament and basic personality will not change. However, you have unlimited potential to change in a way that will build your relationship back up.

From now on, nothing you do is negative, harsh or loud. Assume that what you think he knows, he does not know, so getting angry at him for certain behaviours is a waste of time and energy. Re-teach him with treats and positives.

Avoid direct eye contact. Be a walking treat dispenser. Throw treats as you walk by him, without looking at him. Do this until he starts coming up to you and your wife expecting treats.

Manage his environment so that he does not have the opportunity to do things you do not want him to do - so you don't have to correct him. Supervise so you can show him, calmly and gently what you want. Don't assume that he knows - he is showing behaviours that indicate that he has no idea what is expected from him, and thus is living in constant fear of being corrected for . . . what? He is confused . . .

Start with small expectations, easy goals, in your mind, Fritz can do no wrong. If you approach it this way, Fritz will pick up on your new attitude and it will help re-build his confidence.
 

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I think, first, stop all the "no"s and yelling at him. If Frtiz is this way right now, I would put all the obedience stuff to the side and just work on bonding and building his confidence via lots of interactive games like tugging and fetching (if he will bring the ball back). I know you walk Fritz a lot. My advice is to cut back on the miles and miles of walking and just play games with him for awhile.

Also if you know he is uncomfortable with strangers, then if possible I would remove him from any situation where you think he is going to act badly. Put him in the crate or outside. Anytime a dog is uncomfortable about something, you have to approach very slowly and gradually, inch by inch. Some people advocate "flooding" the dog and basically asking him to "get over it" or use the occasion to "teach" the dog to behave. I don't agree with that at all.
We cut way back on the walking and ball play as he hurt his shoulder running down a hill. We now have him doing shorter walks and swimming daily. We play swim/fetch and tug of war (which I was against) and I always let him win. He's fine when distracted by play but one on one affection time,he's pathetically timid now. He showed up a submissive peer and it got better but 2 corrections and he's a mess.
 

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I think you'll have to completely change your approach and interacitons with Fritz to build his confidence back up. Since he has been submissive and shy from the time he was a puppy, he very much needs gentle, patient direction and management to do well, and no corrections. To me, this is a dog that is confused and terriefied, and does not understand why you are acting the way you are - somewhere there has been a huge breakdown in communications, which is only confusing Fritz more, and making you more frustrated.

Fritz is Fritz, and his temperament and basic personality will not change. However, you have unlimited potential to change in a way that will build your relationship back up.

From now on, nothing you do is negative, harsh or loud. Assume that what you think he knows, he does not know, so getting angry at him for certain behaviours is a waste of time and energy. Re-teach him with treats and positives.

Avoid direct eye contact. Be a walking treat dispenser. Throw treats as you walk by him, without looking at him. Do this until he starts coming up to you and your wife expecting treats.

Manage his environment so that he does not have the opportunity to do things you do not want him to do - so you don't have to correct him. Supervise so you can show him, calmly and gently what you want. Don't assume that he knows - he is showing behaviours that indicate that he has no idea what is expected from him, and thus is living in constant fear of being corrected for . . . what? He is confused . . .

Start with small expectations, easy goals, in your mind, Fritz can do no wrong. If you approach it this way, Fritz will pick up on your new attitude and it will help re-build his confidence.
This dog has been kid gloved and 2 corrections have turned this 85 pound 8 month old into mush. Never seen anything like it.
 

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I totally agree with Lucia. Fritz is Fritz and you have to work with the pup you have in front of you. It's pretty obvious he is a very sensitive dog and that's how you need to approach things ... for example, if you are going to correct him for something down the line, just keep in mind a soft "no" or a disapproving stare might just be enough for young Fritz so no need to raise your voice or even physically correct him.

Every dog is different. Some are hard and dense (and training those dogs is no picnic either) and some are soft and sensitive. There is nothing inherently good or bad about either. But they do require different tactics and approaches.
 

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Follow Castlemaid's advice. You have a very submissive dog. You should not be correcting it for anything, but encouraging desired behavior. I have a 4 month old, a 3 year old and a 5 year old and I can't think of a reason why I would need to give them a correction. They are all happy to adjust to my "game". If I am training and they do the wrong thing, I just say, "let's try it again". When they don't receive their praise, they know they didn't do it right.
 

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It sounds like you have a soft dog. Some dogs are WAY more sensitive to their people than others.

Your best bet is to rework the way you interact with him. Lots of positive teaching behaviors to rebuild your bond and create trust (think clicker and treats- the sound of the clicker is non-emotional and I would recommend becoming non-emotional in everything you do with this pup for awhile). I would work on non-rewards and ignoring as your primary methods of corrections. No yelling, No grabbing. Your dog can't take it.
 

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It's obvious this dog can't take correction but in the case of lunging at a guest right out of the blue which started this mess I can't see an option. He's got to know that's unwanted behavior and not something I could have ignored. It appears I've covered the spectrum in temperament now as my first GSD was extremely confident and aggressive,followed by 3 very stable GSDs and now Fritz.
 

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I know this is your 5th GSD but obviously, as you stated, it's your first one that is this submissive. We have a Boxer like this. Nothing we did made her this way but all that we did reinforced her submissiveness. When we didn't understand why she was hiding under the table and told her "It's ok." thus reinforcing that cowering under the table for no reason was a good thing. When she was doing something she wasn't supposed to and we hollered across the house 'No!" it sent her running to hide under the table. It quickly turns into a vicious cycle.

Everything you can do with a confident dog is a huge No No with a submissive dog.

If I were you, I would go find a trainer that has alot of knowledge with submissive dogs and building confidence. Everything has to be soft, low key. He's not pathetic, he just is what he is.

Play games with him. IT will reinforce your relationship and his confidence. They don;t have to be rough and tumble games. It could be hide and seek in the house. When he is healed, take him to agility to build his confidence.

And in the end...if you feel that this is not something you can handle then rehome him to a quiet home. Not a pleasant notion but sometimes it's best for everyone.
 

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I missed the part where he lunged at the guest. Did he do this out of fear? He is about that age.

And I don't disagree that it unacceptable. You just need to find a different way to handle it. Maybe put him on a leash when company is over until he settles down. That works for our oldest Boxer.
 

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It's obvious this dog can't take correction but in the case of lunging at a guest right out of the blue which started this mess I can't see an option. He's got to know that's unwanted behavior and not something I could have ignored. It appears I've covered the spectrum in temperament now as my first GSD was extremely confident and aggressive,followed by 3 very stable GSDs and now Fritz.
How well socialized is he?

How many hundreds of people has he met?

How many dog classes has he attended?

How many friends/family do you have over every week?

I raised 3 dogs before I got my current Miss Glory B who is also an excitement/submissive pee'er. But I learned early on that

If you change your tone and give him lots of positive feedback his attitude could change. I am trying to help. When he does something wrong do not yell at him, correct him in another manner. An example: your dog is getting too rough with you, like biting, try to give him a toy to bite instead, if that doesn't work you can ignore him and not play with him, if that doesn't work you can put him in his crate for a time out. Even though they make us angry and frustrated we should not raise our voices at them or be forceful.
would ONLY make things worse.

Instead I had to become a better trainer and dog leader in my home. I had to use my brain to figure out a calm and quiet way to get the same behavior I wanted.

Because Glory can be 'soft' I made sure to do anything I could to expose her to the world in a great way (continuously) so she learned it was instead a wonderful place full of wonderful people so she could prance out into it with her head held high and with confidence.

I didn't avoid anything that would put her off, instead I knew my job was to use my big brain to figure out how to make it wonderful. Treats. Toys. tugging. Happy and confident ME makes a happy and confident puppy.

Have you been doing this (tons new smells and sights):


And this (new place/people/smells/dogs):


New people, new dogs, new place


What have you done to get your puppy to be happier, have more confidence, know you are a reliable leader in any situation, willing to meet any new situation?


This problem cannot be 'corrected' out of our dogs. And it's not an 'obedience' issue. So if it's only addressed as such it will get worse not better.

BTW, my Glory B is 14 months old and no longer has the issue any more. So this way does work.
 

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How well socialized is he?

How many hundreds of people has he met?

How many dog classes has he attended?

How many friends/family do you have over every week?

I raised 3 dogs before I got my current Miss Glory B who is also an excitement/submissive pee'er. But I learned early on that



would ONLY make things worse.

Instead I had to become a better trainer and dog leader in my home. I had to use my brain to figure out a calm and quiet way to get the same behavior I wanted.

Because Glory can be 'soft' I made sure to do anything I could to expose her to the world in a great way (continuously) so she learned it was instead a wonderful place full of wonderful people so she could prance out into it with her head held high and with confidence.

I didn't avoid anything that would put her off, instead I knew my job was to use my big brain to figure out how to make it wonderful. Treats. Toys. tugging. Happy and confident ME makes a happy and confident puppy.

Have you been doing this (tons new smells and sights):

YouTube - Glory B (11 wks) and Bretta Lee (5 yrs) Hiking in the Woods

And this (new place/people/smells/dogs):

YouTube - German Shepherd puppy 15 Weeks - Socialization at Dog Fair

New people, new dogs, new place

YouTube - Hiking the Poconos w/Friends and their dogs

What have you done to get your puppy to be happier, have more confidence, know you are a reliable leader in any situation, willing to meet any new situation?

YouTube - GSD Agility Class - 5 months old

This problem cannot be 'corrected' out of our dogs. And it's not an 'obedience' issue. So if it's only addressed as such it will get worse not better.

BTW, my Glory B is 14 months old and no longer has the issue any more. So this way does work.
If there are more socialized dogs than mine I have not met them,with people and dogs.

I recognize that "correction" triggers the problem.

We are lucky to be surrounded by forests, conservation lands,lakes.ponds,cranberry bogs and the ocean of which he visits 2-3 times daily.

He has tremendous ball drive and will ignore everything else if a ball/stick is in play.

We have an appointment with a trainer who evaluated him 8 weeks ago.
 

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If there are more socialized dogs than mine I have not met them,with people and dogs.
I bet mine are....but that doesn't mean you haven't worked with your dogs some too. :)
 
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