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<span style='font-size: 14pt'> <span style='font-family: Book Antiqua'> So Jake is now 3 months old as of today and aside from walking right under my feet and then stopping and looking back at me with every step (i'll post pictures of my cast when I eventually trip over him and break my leg) the only other pet peeve I have with him is this.....

He won't stop jumping on me when i'm sitting on the couch. He jumps in the yard when I come outside but I just turn and ignore him and he stops. Aside from the fact that I have a very nice leather and suede $3,000.00 livingroom set, he's tearing my arms and legs up with his claws when he jumps. He tore a hole in the recliner last week jumping up on it. He doesn't jump up onto the furniture, just runs and jumps to where his front legs/paws go up on it. What can I do to effectively stop this? I've tried saying "no" and pushing him down. I've tried the ever popular ignoring him so he realizes he doesn't get any attention anymore and stops method....no such luck. I have to crate him when he's inside and we're trying to watch tv because he won't stop and lay down.</span> </span>
 

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work on a little training by the sofa.

teach him 'down' with treat. Teach it outside or somewhere other than by the sofa (if you've been saying 'down' just to get him to stop jumping, choose a new word like 'platz').

When he understands the command, start using it near the sofa - before he jumps - and reward, praise, praise.
 

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put a lead on him in the house, he will be easier to correct and redirect. I do that even with adult dogs when I have a behavior issue that needs my constant supervision.
 

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Zyp and Betsy both have excellent advice. And DianaM is right, he may need more exersice to keep him out of trouble. Good luck and keep us posted of his progress.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Originally Posted By: DianaMWhat do you do for daily exercise and training?
During the day he has free run of my very large backyard. I walk him every night around the cul-de-sac I live on (can't take him AND the two kids by myself so I have to stick close to the house). During the day when I get the kids to play in their room or take a nap I go out back and play ball for a few hours with him.
 

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During the day I'll bet he does nothing but sleep most of the time when you're not around. Dogs have a habit of all but shutting down when we're not by them! If you're with him, that's great, do lots of playtime.

I noted a walk and lots of ball play, but no training! Dogs get the most tired when they have to work their brains. Train the puppy several times a day- a couple minutes many times during the day will go a lot farther than one 15 minute session (and the puppy would not last through a long session). The GSD is one breed where physical exercise doesn't do nearly as much as mental exercise. In fact, my dog is more tired after holding a long down outdoors and other simple obedience commands around a ton of distractions than he is after a half hour of hard-running fetch!

You'll find your pup will be doing MUCH better after mixing in a lot of mental work with his exercise. You can also turn mealtime into training- portion out one of his usual meals then give each kibble bit-by-bit in exchange for working commands. If he's hungry he'll be very motivated! You don't have to go through the whole bowl; after a really awesome response, you can put down the bowl and let him finish. Or you can scatter his kibble around the house (remember where you put them), hiding some, and this will teach him to use his nose and '"hunt" for his food. Tracking is a big mental game and it'll go a long way towards ensuring a tired pup. Have you thought about puppy classes? You can be sure that the nights after puppy class he'll be passed out from exhaustion.


In all, this pup needs a lot more mental exercise and probably more physical exercise. Try to go for longer walks whenever possible (not too long at this age); walks can be very stimulating for the mind. Keep things fun and upbeat!
 

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Ok great information. It's hard to take him on longer walks or to the store with him alot since we have one vehicle and my husband works 24 hour shifts every other day. He's on overtime today so he's gone, with the vehicle, for 3 days. I've looked into puppy classes but most of the ones i've found are on the same day every week which I cannot do due to my husband's schedule
 

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I agree exercise is the key. Tire him out and you will have much less a problem. My Gunner is extremely active and if I don't take him for a couple of long walks he bounces off the wall's

I agree with DianaM when my Gunner gets home from training class he is totally exhausted it can't be the physical part he has to be used to that it has to be the mental part.
 

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More exercise, and more important than physical exercise he needs mental exercise. In other words, training! This will not only help you gain more control over his behavior by teaching him to follow commands, it will help fulfill that need all GSDs have to use their brain and interact with their owners.

Also, in terms of jumping, rather than just focusing on the behavior you don't want, teach him a behavior you do want. It's much easier for a dog to understand what to do than be left to his own devices to figure out what not to do. A dog who is sitting can't jump, so when it come to greeting people or getting petted, teach him to sit. If he breaks the sit, tell him "no", and immediately stop any petting or reinforcement of his behavior. Then when he sits again, resume petting. This way he learns that sitting gets him the attention he wants, whereas jumping or anything else doesn't. So he'll naturally choose to sit.
 

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Originally Posted By: Chris Wild

Also, in terms of jumping, rather than just focusing on the behavior you don't want, teach him a behavior you do want. It's much easier for a dog to understand what to do than be left to his own devices to figure out what not to do. A dog who is sitting can't jump, so when it come to greeting people or getting petted, teach him to sit. If he breaks the sit, tell him "no", and immediately stop any petting or reinforcement of his behavior. Then when he sits again, resume petting. This way he learns that sitting gets him the attention he wants, whereas jumping or anything else doesn't. So he'll naturally choose to sit.
Definately try this!! NOTHING was helping with Allie and her jumping up for months, but this did the trick. It kindof took awhile though, but she was very persistent. Once we were 100% consistent with her it worked well, we are still working on generalizing the concept to other people though.

Plus, it is just too cute when they sidle up next to you and sit down waiting for some affection. She will sit there forever! if i am doing something else just waiting...
 
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