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Saw a beautiful looking 2 years GSD female in the shelter:

No children under 18
Raw diet
Mandatory obedience class
Retiree or WFH
 

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I reread the post, it 's recommended for a home without kids, for safety purpose, if you were familiar with rescue, practically any dogs over 60lbs will almost never get recommended for a house with kids under 10.

This dog has no aggression issue, not at all. ( They will mention it if it does), a dog good with cat is always a stable dog, as far as my experience, Maple is good with cat!

There's no temperament problem with Maple from what I can see, it's just that it has to be on raw diet. I won't take a GSD anywhere without leash around small kids, even if I know the dog is stable and pose no danger, the risk is always there, with almost any large breed.

I will take her in if I qualify, without any hesitation
 

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A lot of rescues have high failure rates.
 

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This is a good example of why I don't deal with rescues. Mandatory 8 week class, can't be alone for more than 3 hours, must be experienced in dog sports, this list gives me migraines. She could be a good dog, they don't do a good job of making me want her.
but is it a good example?
it’s an extremely atypical listing... in over 20yrs of volunteering, adopting and regularly reading listing of various breeds and organizations, not once have i come across one with this many requirements. especially the raw diet.

those who are interested or committed to rescue, find the organization and dog that fits for them. no one needs a reason to not adopt.

eta: on the most recent adoption application i filled out, i essentially had to explain my situation almost exclusively by checking the “other” boxes. it lead to a very nice conversation with the founder and i learned that there were quite a view “in lieu of” situations that were acceptable to them. i could have easily disqualified myself...but i liked the dog and knew i could handle her, so i spoke up.

they aren’t setting up cameras at your house and seizing the dog if you’re gone 4hrs... they’re just trying to give you information of what’s likely to work best for that particular dog based on the info they have to avoid having the dog returned.
 

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but is it a good example?
it’s an extremely atypical listing... in over 20yrs of volunteering, adopting and regularly reading listing of various breeds and organizations, not once have i come across one with this many requirements. especially the raw diet.

those who are interested or committed to rescue, find the organization and dog that fits for them. no one needs a reason to not adopt.

eta: on the most recent adoption application i filled out, i essentially had to explain my situation almost exclusively by checking the “other” boxes. it lead to a very nice conversation with the founder and i learned that there were quite a view “in lieu of” situations that were acceptable to them. i could have easily disqualified myself...but i liked the dog and knew i could handle her, so i spoke up.

they aren’t setting up cameras at your house and seizing the dog if you’re gone 4hrs... they’re just trying to give you information of what’s likely to work best for that particular dog based on the info they have to avoid having the dog returned.
There are more reasonable ones. This listing is a bit excessive. I understand there are exceptions. but listing requirements like that will generally run off a lot of potential suitors. Granted, that is partly the goal. There is stuff in there that grinds my gears a little.
 

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but is it a good example?
it’s an extremely atypical listing... in over 20yrs of volunteering, adopting and regularly reading listing of various breeds and organizations, not once have i come across one with this many requirements.
Might help to explain this:
PLEASE NOTE (July 14, 2020 ): Maple is available for adoption; we will take down the post once she is adopted.

I looked into a 12 week old GSD that was up for adoption back just before COVID hit. They had a 5 page but pretty standard adoption application (have you had a dog before, experience with large breeds, understand the exercise and $$ requirements of a dog etc) and the only thing I answered "no" on was the requirement/preference of a fenced yard. Due to the breed and age of the dog, they had 140 applicants....
 

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I was rejected by a DS rescue because I didn't have a fenced yard.

I emailed them a resume listing my experience and credentials complete with professional references.

I was still denied because I didn't have a fence.
 

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I was rejected by a DS rescue because I didn't have a fenced yard.

I emailed them a resume listing my experience and credentials complete with professional references.

I was still denied because I didn't have a fence.
:LOL::LOL::LOL:
 

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I was rejected by a DS rescue because I didn't have a fenced yard.

I emailed them a resume listing my experience and credentials complete with professional references.

I was still denied because I didn't have a fence.
I was trying to adopt a dog that was on a euth list and was turned down because I did not have a 6' fence! Had a 4' fence, apparently that 2 feet was an issue.
Got a friend of mine to try and they turned her down because she had never owned a GSD. I hate rescues.
Wanted to take another girl that was developing some behavior issues and was rejected because they found out I used a prong on Punk.

I placed a TON of pups all viable applications reviewed on a case by case basis and had two dogs returned.
 

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Yes, I have rescue experience. I have a friend who is very involved with a GSD rescue and who has children. That didn’t stop her from adopting several dogs from her rescue and from fostering many more.
 

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I did intake for a rescue group for a while. A fenced yard was not a rock solid deal breaker. They needed a home inspection first, then evaluated whether a dog might run away if placed in that home. Keeping a dog outdoors meant instant elimination. Giving up previous dogs was a red flag, even if the reasons were good. Keep in mind stray dogs usually become that way because they are runners for some reason. They assume if a dog can run, it will. Although two rescues ago, I took in a dog who was a repeat offender due to running away from a bad home. Once I got him, he became a Velcro and never once tried to escape. He was glued to me.
 

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We were turned away because we did not have a 6' fence, too. Never mind we had adopted from that shelter before and had Elke from that shelter already. Just depends on what some - excuse me- psycho know-it-all behaviorist has determined the dog needs. We subsequently adopted Duke from - you guessed it - that shelter. We went on a busy Saturday when they were trying to set a record for animals adopted out in a day. For some odd reason they were seriously overcrowded by that time....
We assume a dog will run if he's decided to run and keep them on leashes until we're confident they will not. Elke will chase after a deer or bunny but turn around when she doesn't catch it. Duke, the brainless, just wanders around in the woods and returns half an hour later as if nothing happened.
I should add that we got Lucky because he was scaling a 6' fence to go eat the neighbors chickens. so there. A dogs gonna do what a dogs gonna do.

Maple looks like a wonderful girl and I've found Petfinder to be more of a data gathering service than pet finder. Is she in a real shelter or the home of someone who collects dogs?
 

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I was rejected by a DS rescue because I didn't have a fenced yard.

I emailed them a resume listing my experience and credentials complete with professional references.

I was still denied because I didn't have a fence.
I haven't had a fence in the last 25 years and don't plan on one ever. How else can you see the sunrise? :cool:
 

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Sometimes I am taken aback by the requirements, one rescue near me won't adopt to anyone with a fenced yard if that yard isn't directly accessible by a house door.. but they will consider adopting to people in condos and apartments?? I am at a loss as to the logic of this - and your application must be submitted with a non refundable fee. They also will only adopt to someone who can prove having owned a dog of the same breed before. Among a myriad of other rules and requirements. It's a tad disheartening, their available dogs rarely change and a constant outpouring of we have no money or food, please donate messages.

I adopted a GSD many years ago, the lady from the rescue was calling me 3 to 4 times a week to check in - if I missed two calls in a row the messages left were threats to come get the dog back. I finally got fed up and told her that if her plan was to continue with the calls she could come and get the dog - despite being settled in nicely she wasn't worth the headache of dealing with the people. The calls stopped, the dog stayed and everyone was happy. I understand following up but there has to be a limit.

I also know many people who have adopted and are over the moon happy with their experience.
 

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some things to add, a bit of a dog shortage in this area--attractive dogs advertised will get 100's of applications so there's weeding going on.

Many "Nice-easy-healthy-young" dogs never make-it to petfinder ads as rescues have lists of waiting adopters to choose from.

I was rejected for not having a fenced yard (our yard is too small to exercise a dog so we refuse to fence it)...my husband said nonsence and phoned the rescue. He came away from the conversation thinking things had gone badly, keep looking. (we had put in an application for an under 50lb gsd looking mix).

A month later in my inbox was an offer for a gorgeous "bc-mix looking for home with 'active' couple" <--har har-->code for hyper-energetic, and yes, I knew what that meant.

Well, I got myself a nice dog from that rescue, not an easy dog, but exactly what one expects a dog "for active couple" to be.

So, these descriptions are sometimes crafted to weed out unsuitable homes and attract suitable homes. Making a phone call or following up with a personal letter may be worth your time if you want that dog. While some rescues have standardized lists of needs, sometimes those needs lists are code for the dog's temperament, and one should read between the lines.
 
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