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I've seen videos, even on this site, about teaching a dog to stand on an object(a book or something) and keep his front feet in place. Then to spin in either direction, etc. I am looking for ideas, and videos, on how to teach this but not knowing what it's called I'm not finding what I'm looking for. Anyone have sone links I can check out, or ideas to get me started? Thanks
 

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Great video!!! Thanks for sharing. Been looking for this kind if thing for a bit!!


Sent from Petguide.com Free App
 

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Carma 5/14/13 - YouTube

My channel has quite a few videos of teaching my puppy this.
Thanks, I saw your videos earlier but couldn't find them again. With only music though I can't get a good idea of how to get the dog started. My dog doesn't seem to associate standing on the. Object with getting the treat. He comes, stands, stays, but I'm wondering how to get him associated with standing on the object?

Great videos though, thanks or sharing. Your dogs amazing, especially when as young as whn this video was taken.
 

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I'm trying to teach Dax how to do this. So far he's working on figuring out that I want his feet on the bowl! lol. He's doing good though with my lack of knowledge on this particular subject.
 

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I taught Rai to place his feet on an object by luring with a treat and marking as soon as he placed at least one foot on the object. After a few times only treat for both feet then you can start incorporating the spin. They'll get it quickly and run to stand on the object expecting a treat.
 

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Ahaa, when I saw this thread title I thought you meant literally having the dog stand on a raised platform and spin, like this:


What you're looking for is more likely to be described as "pivoting in Heel" or "left pivot/right pivot" or some combination thereof.

Here's the tutorial I used when I was first learning it:

 

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Well it's only been a couple days, but he's getting pretty good at one paw on the object. I picked up a little step stool. Hopefully we can move on to 2 paws soon:).
 

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Any tips on getting him to spin while standing on the object? He stands perfectly, but I can't get him to spin while keeping his from feet on the stool. I'm doing this by myself, so I can't have someone else hold the treat while I guide him or anything. I just can't get him to move his back end in a circle.
 

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You may be pushing for too much too fast -- that's the most common reason to hit that stumbling block.

Are you using a clicker or marker? If so, watch closely for ANY movement of the hind feet, however small, even just a shuffle of one foot a half-inch. Click/mark that with a jackpot of treats and a big praise party (assuming your dog likes that, of course; if not, substitute whatever your dog DOES really like).

It is often easier to start by getting movement to the left, because if you are in Heel position, you can prompt the movement by shuffling very slightly into your dog and crowding him so that he has to move to the left. A lot of dogs will step off the book/stool to make room, so don't be too worried about pushing your dog off the prop, just be aware of the issue and prepared to work around it. As above, click/mark the hind leg movement and try to control your own spatial pressure so that you are getting hind leg movement and as little front leg movement as possible (this may require some creative movements on your part, such as just moving one foot and not the rest of your body, etc.).

You can also "bend" the lure around your body (i.e., move the lure across your body so that you're creating a physical barricade with your own body) to encourage his front end to move in such a way that his back feet have to shuffle to reach the treat. It's hard to put in words what I mean, but if I have time later I'll try to make a video to show what I'm talking about.

The main thing is: be aware of small movements that are in the right direction of your end goal, and be quick and precise about marking and rewarding them. This particular sequence requires a little bit more skill than capturing a Sit usually does, so be patient with both your dog and yourself as you develop your timing. :)
 

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You may be pushing for too much too fast -- that's the most common reason to hit that stumbling block.

Are you using a clicker or marker? If so, watch closely for ANY movement of the hind feet, however small, even just a shuffle of one foot a half-inch. Click/mark that with a jackpot of treats and a big praise party (assuming your dog likes that, of course; if not, substitute whatever your dog DOES really like).

It is often easier to start by getting movement to the left, because if you are in Heel position, you can prompt the movement by shuffling very slightly into your dog and crowding him so that he has to move to the left. A lot of dogs will step off the book/stool to make room, so don't be too worried about pushing your dog off the prop, just be aware of the issue and prepared to work around it. As above, click/mark the hind leg movement and try to control your own spatial pressure so that you are getting hind leg movement and as little front leg movement as possible (this may require some creative movements on your part, such as just moving one foot and not the rest of your body, etc.).

You can also "bend" the lure around your body (i.e., move the lure across your body so that you're creating a physical barricade with your own body) to encourage his front end to move in such a way that his back feet have to shuffle to reach the treat. It's hard to put in words what I mean, but if I have time later I'll try to make a video to show what I'm talking about.

The main thing is: be aware of small movements that are in the right direction of your end goal, and be quick and precise about marking and rewarding them. This particular sequence requires a little bit more skill than capturing a Sit usually does, so be patient with both your dog and yourself as you develop your timing. :)
Thanks for the info, that will help.
 
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