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Discussion Starter #1
Hiya, just was curious, is there something that can make it a little easier to control my girl when she lunges or reacts to something?

(I know I have a few dog reactivity threads floating around here, but lunging at dogs isnt a problem, we don't get close to them, but the occasional lunging at a squirrel or rabbit that zips by is enough to pull a muscle in my arm.)

She does good on loose leash walking, actually really awesome on it, I use just a nylon collar, but just every once in awhile if we spook something out of a bush she tries to take off lol. Okay, so yes, I know that's not perfect loose leash walking.

Equipment I have: front clip harness, head collar, flat collars
When I use the head collar I use 2 leashes, I don't like putting all the pressure on her face if she decides to go after a critter, I put the brunt of it on her flat collar. Harness doesn't seem to help me have more control.

What do you think the best tool is? She's only 50 lbs, but she's going to get bigger, but I'm only like 115 lbs, so this is already hard for me :cry: I could get a prong if that's what you guys recommend, but since she walks well on just a flat one I dont know if its necessary

***ALSO I know the best solution is to train this out of her and teach her that lunging at critters is NOT okay, we're working on that. I even allow her to chase some of them as long as she sits and downs prior aka an alternate behavior, then I will give her the release word and she goes. THis is just so I stop injuring my arm, because even if she startles something once every 2 days and lunges, it's enough to prevent my shoulder joint from healing lol - she's not even 6 months old yet, so I know she's a puppy and still wants to chase
 

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Prong collar. Be sure to research how to fit it and placement on the neck, should be up high. And yes you should incorporate some training while you walk, you can distract with treats or a toy, say "leave it" or whatever command you want to do.
 

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A prong collar and training. With my first dog, I thought they seemed mean and learned they are not. It took my dog pulling me over after a critter to learn it was safer for both of us. In time with training and age we no longer needed it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
She will be 6 months old in 2 weeks, is this too young for a prong?
 

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You have plenty of tools, but use of tools without commands is a game with a puppet. You don't say anything, what comands you give her at a time? There are two basic commands "Heel!" and "Walk", on a long leash dog should come to you imediately if you recall, and walk beside you as long as you ask, then you send her forward to run freely, and so repeatedly - walk, heel, heel, walk. How well does she respond on your command? Because, the command comes first, and use of the tool comes second. Before that happened, you should make sure, that your dog heeds and knows the meanings of your commands. What about that?
 

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I do a lot of sports where dogs get REALLY amped up waiting their turn (not aggressively and not barking at other dogs or people but just jumping around and sounding off in excitement) and in most of these venues you are only allowed a flat collar and normal leash. It's very common for competitors to basically tie the leash around the dog's middle or groin. The dogs don't like it and it keeps them under control. Works FAR better than any head halter, walking harness, and even a prong collar in my experience (my dog will lunge into a prong collar, doesn't care).

Image from Google search
 

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tie the leash around the dog's middle or groin.
Yes, of course, if your dog forgets given "heel" command and keeps on walking the way he likes, this technique is super as a correction. No medieval stuff either. I know another kind method. You don't need anything special. I prefer soft leather, IMHO, it looks better than nylon, better for your hands as well. The principle is simple, it based on "start walking" and "stop walking". You stop every time your dog pulls the lead. Command "heel" - and stop if she doesn't return to you. Keep her toy in your right hand close to the middle of your chest whilest walking, control your dog with left hand only. Your fist with enclosed short lead should be slightly above your dogs head. Walking by the wall might turn helpful.
I've heard that some dog trainers even sharpen these "prongs", so it works better...Would your consciousness be clear?
 

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Seconded, Liesje! That's the only kind of 'corrective attire' we're allowed to use in the kennels at work, and for the 100lb+ dogs it's the only way to avoid getting slung head-long down the stairs. Just keep adjusting it; it'll end up behind their elbows before you know it.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You have plenty of tools, but use of tools without commands is a game with a puppet. You don't say anything, what comands you give her at a time? There are two basic commands "Heel!" and "Walk", on a long leash dog should come to you imediately if you recall, and walk beside you as long as you ask, then you send her forward to run freely, and so repeatedly - walk, heel, heel, walk. How well does she respond on your command? Because, the command comes first, and use of the tool comes second. Before that happened, you should make sure, that your dog heeds and knows the meanings of your commands. What about that?
I usually use "with me" or "wait" when I do not want her to go forward. When I stop (unless she's distracted) she sits and waits for me to keep walking. I would say that heel needs a lot more work, but "with me" she knows means to not pull on the leash, to leave slack, to stay close, but I would not say if she was distracted she would listen to that - so the commands for sure, absolutely need more work :) I have already planned on continuing to work with them, it was more of just I need a tool at the moment, because the current one I am using is causing my arm physical pain.

I do a lot of sports where dogs get REALLY amped up waiting their turn (not aggressively and not barking at other dogs or people but just jumping around and sounding off in excitement) and in most of these venues you are only allowed a flat collar and normal leash. It's very common for competitors to basically tie the leash around the dog's middle or groin. The dogs don't like it and it keeps them under control. Works FAR better than any head halter, walking harness, and even a prong collar in my experience (my dog will lunge into a prong collar, doesn't care).

Image from Google search
This is funny, I actually did this the other day just as an experiment to see if it worked because she was in a pully mood, which only happens at night when she is over tired, it worked really well, but would a lunge on this hurt more than a prong correction? I haven't used a prong before so pardon me if that is a dumb question :(
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Oh yeah, so can someone tell me if 6 months is too young for prong? just wondering still
 
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