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I know it sounds terrible. But I’m so tired of my puppy and I feel like I only like her when she’s in the crate or sleeping. She’s good on walks, sometimes. ALL and I mean ALL she wants to do is bite me. I’ve tried everything and she doesn’t care, I even resorted to a smack on the nose and nothing. She broke skin multiple times. It’s miserable and I know everyone says she’s just a puppy but it’s miserable and I don’t like being around her.
 

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Use that natural desire for good. Check the puppy biting threads but also realize that some fun drive games can be great for bonding and as rewards for good behavior. Check out The Collared Scholar for how to use that drive to play with your dog. Also follow Jack Jacks GRC dog sport for more tips on how to use that urge to play rough and build a great relationship (he is more of a bully breed guy but the ideas translate between breeds). Leerburgh also has videos on the Power of Play.
 

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How old is she & how long have you had her?

I realize it's a common figure of speech, but you must also realize that no, you haven't tried everything.
 

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Teething currently or done with teething?

Assuming she is biting in a non-injurious, though still annoying, "hey I want your attention" manner:

1)Have you tried "re-directing" her to a toy or a ball?

2) More exercise and stimulation? A tired puppy is a good puppy, so assuming there is some activity other than biting that she will engage in, like fetch, use that to help tire her out.

If she is biting in a truly hurtful manner, and it is not driven by teething, you likely need to step up corrections. I don't like the idea of hauling off and smacking a puppy. I know if can be frustrating, and I can't honestly claim I've never smacked any dog, ever. But I never felt good about it, and generally feel it is counterproductive. That doesn't mean you gravitate to the opposite end of no physical corrections. Others could weigh in on what they think works best.

GSD puppies can be notoriously mouthy, and some are mouthier than others. At one year plus, and 7 months, our two youngsters do not mouth me or my wife.
The 7 month old male pretty much never did. The female was mouthier. She did not bite in an injurious manner. My pants legs and shirt sleeves got lots of holes. My arms, hands and ankles did not. She may have tagged my wife a time or two.

My female described above would generally re-direct to play. Her biting tapered off significantly after teething, and after some back-sliding around 7 months, we started taking her to training twice a week. Also, COVID hit and someone was always home, so she had less crate time, and maybe less pent up energy. Finally, she went through her first heat at 8.5-9 months.
After all those things, and I really can't say which one or which combination stopped it, she quit grabbing my pants leg.
 

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Everyone here is jumping straight to the biting thing, but I’m going to take a different approach. Have you ever heard of puppy blues? The first few weeks after I got my puppy, I was exhausted and near tears, to be completely honest. It’s a huge change to go from a fully trained adult dog (or no dog!) to a puppy again. Every little thing adds up and gets overwhelming. The biting WILL get better. Being frustrated is okay. It’s alright if you need to crate her so you can have a break. It gets easier with time, I promise. You have to decide now if you’re willing to give it time or if you don’t think having a puppy is for you. There’s no shame in that either. Neither of you are defective. You could give her back to the breeder while she’s still young and easily re-homed and take this is a learning opportunity. It’s unfortunate, but sometimes what’s best for a dog is to not stay in a certain home.

Others have given advice as far as the biting if that’s your only issue, but I figured it might help you to hear that other people go through this phase too.
 

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Pretty young, and might be already teething or headed into it.
You mention she is good on walks, sometimes. Maybe take her to a park and let her walk off some of her pent up energy.
 

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At only 15 weeks, your pup is just getting stronger, and more agile. Even the best owner/trainers some times get overwhelmed. Step back, take a breath and be assured, it does get better. Work on more exercise. Use play to teach the pup not to bite (as much). Stick with, exercise, discipline and obedience work.
These dogs are smart and they will learn, so long as you remain committed.
Use the crate when you need a break, and then after you have cooled down, try again.
Remember, every great dog at some point, totally p*ssed off their owner....
 

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She’s 15 weeks
Are you reading through the puppy threads? There's a whole bunch of information to share but it's already right there, typed out a hundred times over.

I have a 4 month old working line pup right now. I have been posting about our training and socialization all along (though it's been a bit since I posted any video).


There are also recent threads that address your specific problems.
 

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Every little thing adds up and gets overwhelming.
I really agree with Pytheis above. The first month of puppyhood was really overwhelming. It's tonnes more work than I ever expected. The re-direction to a toy does work but you really do need to have toys at hand 24/7 so the pup doesn't get a chance to bite you. My pup was extremely mouthy. I was terrified nothing was working. Then one day (11 week +) I realised she hasn't bit me in a few days. Just stick with it. I think a lot of people can relate to where you are now. You CAN teach your pup this.

At 15 weeks your pup is getting big and strong so you can consider other methods to correct. They are described in other threads. Good luck
 

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Your pup could have been totally bite proofed from the 8-15 week period and sooner.
You haven't tried everything or else you haven't done everything correctly, that's the hard reality.
I have had zero bites on my hands, fingers, arms, face etc and exactly zero on my pants, shirts, shoes etc. Oh, that's ever, 6 GSD over 40 years. 10 month old puppy in the house now so I have just been through it (again).

Have you had dogs before and if so what breed?
Are you working from home or away quite a bit with the pup crated?
What does your average exercise and training day look like?
Does your dog generally listen and master basic commands?
How did you approach this in the 8-10 week mark? As you're discovering a 15 week old GSD can be determined and present some formidable chompers even at this age.

German Shepherds are not for everyone and not even for everyone who already has one. They're easier to train than most breeds if you put more work in....

What on earth made you get a GSD? Did you consider a breed with less drive and "demanding enthusiasm"?
 

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I agree with what Pytheis said. I would also try walking away to another room and close the door for a bit when she bites you. I tried quite a few different things for my dog until I did that, and he never bit me again.
 

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OP, I have been training and owning dogs for several decades. With every pup, no matter if I found it or reserved it from a breeder, I had second thoughts about it two weeks later. It took up all my time since I wanted to do it right. After only a few weeks things got better as I worked through all the puppy stuff, usually when they were 4 months old. Sometimes I would step back, especially with the GSDs, and tell myself how lucky I was to finally own a GSD, teeth included. If you continue to feel overwhelmed despite your efforts, return the pup for a better future for both of you.
 

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We are going through the same thing as you.

At times it seems like it's all too much - the peeing, the poohing, the biting.. the biting while you're cleaning up pooh. But you have to perservere - that seems to be the key to raising a GSD puppy. Being firm, patient and determined to succeed.

Listen to the people here - correcting your puppy firmly and quickly is both fair to her and you and will make you both happier.

We only just started correcting for biting as you are describing and the change has been marked overnight. Literally overnight.

Preceed a correction with a warning every time and very quickly, the correction isn't needed so much.

It's not mean - it's just communicating what's acceptable and what's not as close to doggo lingo as you can.

Warn, correct for behaviour you don't want and then move on to a behaviour you do want and reward that.

You will get it done - you just have to do it.

#expert #dogtrainersinceagesago
 

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We are going through the same thing as you.

At times it seems like it's all too much - the peeing, the poohing, the biting.. the biting while you're cleaning up pooh. But you have to perservere - that seems to be the key to raising a GSD puppy. Being firm, patient and determined to succeed.

Listen to the people here - correcting your puppy firmly and quickly is both fair to her and you and will make you both happier.

We only just started correcting for biting as you are describing and the change has been marked overnight. Literally overnight.

Preceed a correction with a warning every time and very quickly, the correction isn't needed so much.

It's not mean - it's just communicating what's acceptable and what's not as close to doggo lingo as you can.

Warn, correct for behaviour you don't want and then move on to a behaviour you do want and reward that.

You will get it done - you just have to do it.

#expert #dogtrainersinceagesago
563385
 

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You could have two!!!

🙄
 
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