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Discussion Starter #1
What I mean by soil is:

Example: Let's say you're building a house. In order to build a house, you have to find a place to build the house. The place you build the house on is the soil or ground.

So what I'm trying to say is, when it comes to breeding, is my "soil" really wrong?

I'm bringing this up because someone told me that you fall in love with a breed and want to improve the breed, so you become a breeder.

You don't fall in love with dogs, love many breeds, and pick one or two breeds to improve.

The statements above are what I was told by a fellow dog ethusianist.

I like and love a lot of breeds. What I don't understand is, so breeders who breed more than one breed are really BYBs?

I'm so confused. :confused: I see nothing wrong with loving dogs and loving more than one breed.

The reason that person said that is because I considered breeding other breeds. The first breed I wanted to breed was the German Shepherd, then I wanted to breed Golden Retrievers, and now I'd really love to become a breeder of siberian huskies.

I love all three breeds. I don't want to start a kennel and breed all three, however, but what's wrong with loving other breeds?

I know I would like to become a breeder because I love dogs and would like to help improve the quality of dogs. Also because of all the things that come with being a breeder, even the negatives aren't bad compared to the good stuff.
 

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They can call you purple with pink polka dots until you have the titles to back you up.
There's no law against what you intend to do.
I've spoken to many reputable breeders and most of them had so much advice and encouragement to give me, they didn't have time to say anything negative. Those are the type of people I tend to take advice from, not the ones that have all the time in the world to put me down.
 

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There is nothing wrong with liking more than one breed, but it's almost impossible to be knowledgeable enough in multiple breeds to really raise yourself above the level of BYB. You would have to know the breed well, the lines, be able to train and compete successfully, and then have the money to afford dogs that are quality titled dogs and worth breeding.

About the only people that do seem to be able to do this is when the breeds are very similar, like breeding deerhounds and borzoi in the same kennel. The types, sports, and breed ring are very similar.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
They can call you purple with pink polka dots until you have the titles to back you up.
There's no law against what you intend to do.
I've spoken to many reputable breeders and most of them had so much advice and encouragement to give me, they didn't have time to say anything negative. Those are the type of people I tend to take advice from, not the ones that have all the time in the world to put me down.
Um, thank you.

If I become a breeder, I just want to do it right. I don't want to be a BYB not because people would look down on me, but because doing it right helps dogs in general and it decreases the chances of the dogs I produce ending up in a shelter.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
There is nothing wrong with liking more than one breed, but it's almost impossible to be knowledgeable enough in multiple breeds to really raise yourself above the level of BYB. You would have to know the breed well, the lines, be able to train and compete successfully, and then have the money to afford dogs that are quality titled dogs and worth breeding.

About the only people that do seem to be able to do this is when the breeds are very similar, like breeding deerhounds and borzoi in the same kennel. The types, sports, and breed ring are very similar.
I wasn't really planning on breeding more than one breed, rather I was looking at the breed I love the most.

About that last part,
what about a breeder who breeds Irish Setters AND Golden Retrievers? Or a breeder who breeds Rotties and GSDs? Those two examples are a lot alike, right?
 

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While to me GSDs are the only breed, and all the rest are just dogs, I disagree with whoever gave you that assessment.

You really should love dogs, or most dogs, different shapes, different sizes, different purposes. When someone tells you they know how to manage big dogs, they have had plenty of labs, well, it is nice to know some of the different traits and characteristics common in gun dogs, and how that might be different for people getting a herding dog for the first time.

Knowing dogs in and out is what breeders really should be thriving for. If someone says they have trained border collies and goldens, how is training a shepherd different, well, actually I do not think that people really ask that question, but you can probably ascertain that if someone is accustomed to how border collies are, they will probably do pretty good with an active GSD. Probably.

But breeding several types of dogs at once, yes even three, that is harder to stomach. If you start out with sheps, and learn, and continuously learn bloodlines, and dogs and dogs and more dogs. If you spend time in the various type of training venues, clubs, shows, eat, sleep, and breath sheps, until you are an expert in many of the different aspects, and you want to add another breed of dog, that would be the way to go about it. But you would then have to keep up with two breeds. Two sets of bloodlines, watching various dogs of two different lines, what they produce, where they are weak, where they are strong and the whole nine yards.

I have a heck of a time learning all I need to know just about shepherds. The more I learn, the more I realize there is so much more to learn. I know that I could not manage more than one breed. But that does not mean that someone else does not have the capacity to do so and to do it well.

You would have to be able to look at yourself and measure yourself with a critical eye to know whether you are keeping up well with each of your breeds.

Health concerns, bloodlines, various training venues, training menthods, different lines (working/show, field/show) different types if separated into color, and all the rest.

It is not something where you can read Von Stephanitz's book and be an expert. It is a living base of knowledge that must be constantly followed.

Do not believe everything people say. Many people apply a thought they have for themselves to everyone in general: i.e. I do not like prong collars, I will not use them, nobody should use them.
 

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I am trying to understand that's all. This is a GSD forum and of course there are many sections for the non GSD topics...I am trying to understand the nature of your question and if you even have a dog.....that's what it's "got" to do with it.
 

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I think it would be very VERY difficult to successfully be a reputable breeder of more than one breed at one time unless it's like the GSD and the mal.
 

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I personally would not buy from a breeder that breeds more than one breed.

I dont mind if the breeder has other breeds as family pets but I want them to be dedicated to breeding one breed and focusing on making that one breed better.

Just my personal opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I am trying to understand that's all. This is a GSD forum and of course there are many sections for the non GSD topics...I am trying to understand the nature of your question and if you even have a dog.....that's what it's "got" to do with it.
I apologize for my rudeness.
 

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I wasn't really planning on breeding more than one breed, rather I was looking at the breed I love the most.

About that last part,
what about a breeder who breeds Irish Setters AND Golden Retrievers? Or a breeder who breeds Rotties and GSDs? Those two examples are a lot alike, right?
Irish Setters and Golden Retrievers are actually pretty different from a hunting standpoint. So you would have to learn how to hunt with a setter as opposed to a retriever. Also, GRs are way more popular than IS so, from a show standpoint that has pros and cons.

I think people breeding Labs and Goldens, can probably do it successfully with more ease. Irish Setters, and English Setters.

But then I know people who can breed completely different breeds and manage to do it well. I would almost think that breeding dogs very close in type, might be a bit more confusing. It would not be hard to keep Pappions straight with Corgi's but it would be a totally different experience in every sense.
 

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I personally would not buy from a breeder that breeds more than one breed.

I dont mind if the breeder has other breeds as family pets but I want them to be dedicated to breeding one breed and focusing on making that one breed better.

Just my personal opinion.
Blanket statements, red flags, you would pass up an awesome dog from an icon in two different breeds, both in showing, and in performance because they do not fit your ideal; but you would buy from a byb putting together their family pets. Whatever.

The person I consider my mentor has bred different breeds over the years, and she has forgotten more about everyone of those breeds than I may ever know. It boggles my mind how much she knows about the one breed, and then come to find out she knows that in every breed she has bred. She has the dogs, the understanding, the know-how, the background; but you would rather go to someone with a pet he is not even sure the lines of, or the dogs behind, because the only dog they are breeding is Shepherds.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I want to say thank you to the people who took a moment to reply.

Um, it's not that I wanted to breed more than one breed, it's just that I was considering different breeds.

What I'm saying is, I love Golden Retrievers, GSDs, siberian huskies, but I would like to be a breeder who breeds only one breed.

Does that make sense?

Now, I'm considering Siberian Huskies. I love the breed and see ways I could improve the breed. I also love the GSD.
 

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Blanket statements, red flags, you would pass up an awesome dog from an icon in two different breeds, both in showing, and in performance because they do not fit your ideal; but you would buy from a byb putting together their family pets. Whatever.
What is your problem today? Your attitude is annoying and uncalled for.

I made the mistake and bought from a BYB before I even knew what one was and I said I wouldn't buy from another BYB again.

I SAID THAT I PERSONALLY WOULDN"T BUY FROM A BREEDER THAT BREEDS MORE THAN ONE BREED. It's my opinion.

I dont give a :censored: what you think about it. Thanks though. :rolleyes:
 

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You have to become an expert on a lot of things on the breed your breeding. You can love and even own other breeds, you might only become an expert on training on those breeds.

Breeding does have an element of passion in it, but I don't think you have to ONLY like want breed in order to be a good breeder.
 

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I personally would not buy from a breeder that breeds more than one breed.

I dont mind if the breeder has other breeds as family pets but I want them to be dedicated to breeding one breed and focusing on making that one breed better.

Just my personal opinion.
I think it is the blanket statements and the family pets that bothers me. You can really not be much more than a BYB if you have just one or two dogs. How will that be focussed on making the breed better. To make the breed better, you have to hold back pups to use for breeding down the line. To be a good breeder you have to be willing to take dogs back. There are so many reasons, why this statement makes me think you will not buy from an excellent breeder, but you would from a BYB.

I do not keep track where people have gotten their current or former pets. So if you think I was slighting you on previous decisions, I am sorry that you took it that way. I just have a problem with the statements listed here.
 

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I think it is the blanket statements and the family pets that bothers me. You can really not be much more than a BYB if you have just one or two dogs. How will that be focussed on making the breed better. To make the breed better, you have to hold back pups to use for breeding down the line. To be a good breeder you have to be willing to take dogs back. There are so many reasons, why this statement makes me think you will not buy from an excellent breeder, but you would from a BYB.

I do not keep track where people have gotten their current or former pets. So if you think I was slighting you on previous decisions, I am sorry that you took it that way. I just have a problem with the statements listed here.
I never said that they have 2 GSD's so I dont know where you got that from? I said that I wouldn't buy from a breeder that breeds more than one breed.

I dont see anything wrong with someone that breeds GSD's but they have a Beagle that is a pet.

I already have my future breeder picked out and he is an excellent breeder, thanks.

I wouldn't give any more of my money to another BYB.
 

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I have a couple of different breeds, grew up with 3 different breeds. I am not a breeder tho:) I wouldn't hesitate to buy from someone who bred more than one breed if it was a dog I wanted for 'whatever'.

My thinking, while I do think people have to start somewhere, for me, I'm going to go to someone who's been doing it for quite some time. For myself, I have no desire to get into the breeding side of things, it's easier for me to research and go buy what I want from someone who knows what they are doing and producing the type of dogs that I'm interested in.
 
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