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My mother says after a dog is bitten by a snake, they can't reproduce? Is that true? I have a gsd scheduled to be studded out for a second time in June. He was bitten by a rattlesnake and recovered last week. Does it effect his fertility?
 

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Should probably ask a vet (school), then follow it up with asking the bitches owner if they are still OK to move forward with the breeding.

Even if the vets say it’s a myth, if the pregnancy doesn’t take, at least you’re covered if they start to “wonder if”

Know what I mean?

I work at a kennel that has a reproduction specialist... I’ll ask her what she knows about it and report back...

Perhaps it’s not the bite itself, but the anti venom shot?
 

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What kind of snake? A Copperhead bite will just swell and be painful and resolve with by itself. A Coral Snake or Timber Rattler there will be no reproduction because the dog will be dead. These species have a very high percentage of neurotoxin that shuts down the central nervous system. So do Mohave Rattlers of the western deserts.

I snake proofed my dog by catching Texas Rat Snakes that come into the henhouse to eat eggs. They can be 5' long or more. The males are highly defensive and aggressive and will readily strike, although they have harmless hooky little teeth. I caught and held them out to Inga and she came to sniff them and was tagged on the nose. When she did I said SNAKE! To proof it I put her in a pen with one that was crawling and coiling to activate her prey drive. Highly effective! Now a snake of any species we encounter she is instantly avoidant.
 
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What kind of snake? A Copperhead bite will just swell and be painful and resolve with by itself. A Coral Snake or Timber Rattler there will be no reproduction because the dog will be dead. These species have a very high percentage of neurotoxin that shuts down the central nervous system. So do Mohave Rattlers of the western deserts.

I snake proofed my dog by catching Texas Rat Snakes that come into the henhouse to eat eggs. They can be 5' long or more. The males are highly defensive and aggressive and will readily strike, although they have harmless hooky little teeth. I caught and held them out to Inga and she came to sniff them and was tagged on the nose. When she did I said SNAKE! To proof it I put her in a pen with one that was crawling and coiling to activate her prey drive. Highly effective! Now a snake of any species we encounter she is instantly avoidant.
Read the original post again.
 

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What kind of Rattlesnake? If it was a Timber Rattler or a Mohave Rattler there would be no reproduction. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timber_rattlesnake
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crotalus_scutulatus

We are in the range of the Timber rattler here.

One time, working in a rural ICU at night, I had a 5 year old patient admitted with snake bite. I had to order the crofab antivenin prescribed by the doctor via telephone from a hospital in the next county delivered via ambulance because we had none. This was quite an experience for me. Having to start an IV in a child while the frantic mother hovered over added to this.

Even though Inga is snake proofed it is always possible that she might step on a snake out on a horse ride in tall brush and grass. Such is one of the risks of having a dog.
 

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I’m back. This is the response I got...

“Any traumatic event can cause at least transient fertility issues - we've not had a breeder bitten so it's not on the top of my head what the long-term issues would be with venom and antivenin, but it wouldn't be surprising that he may have issues for several months post-event and I would certainly recommend that this person have a semen evaluation done prior to any breeding to assess how he's looking.

A semen cycle is about 2 months, so especially if the bite and all medical procedure and medications occurred within that period of time in particular, I'd say there's a good chance that this dog's fertility will be compromised.

I hope this is helpful, and I'm glad that the dog survived his encounter with the rattlesnake!”
 

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