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We have this new dog now, Sheba, a 3 yo GSD girl. She is very friendly and just wants to play w/ other dogs, but she plays rough and I worry about her w/ small ones. Not sure if she sees them as toys or playmates, but even if she just plays, it might be too much for a little dog.
However, we walk daily in a popular park, and unfortunatelly not every other dog is on leash. This is something i have learned to lived with, nothing can be done about that.

So... how do I teach her to ignore other dogs off leash?

I mean when they run over in her personal space and lounge/bark/snarl, it would be cool if I didn't have to worry about what can happen. I try to position myself between them and she is always on leash, but as we all know, this does not prevent others from running over.

Today actually an old lady with a little terrier came across us, little on off leash of course, running over to meet & greet, me telling her to please leash him. Lady: coming, but see I am so old I can not run as fast as he can. Me: well then maybe you shouldn't let him off leash?
Answer: Shut up.
Yep, that's exactly what she said.

So, see, the only thing I can do is to teach Sheba that no matter what, she has to ignore others. Obviosly people like this lady will never see the wrong in their deeds.
 

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Practice the "leave it" command.

Practice it with toys, treats, people, dogs, bushes, etc, so that no matter what it is, she learns to ignore it when you give the command.
 

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Quote:
Answer: Shut up.
Yep, that's exactly what she said.
A friend of mine says he can't wait to become old so that he can get away with being a total jerk. I always laugh at that. After hearing this, maybe I won't laugh quite so much.

Back on topic, a leave-it command is exactly what I use. Then, work on rock-solid sit-stays, so that you can put your dog into a sit-stay while you move out in front of your dog and "punt, pass or kick" the dog out of your dog's face.

Also, you may wish to practice a fast pivot (if your dog walks on your left, then you want to turn LEFT into your dog, so that your dog isn't swinging out where the little dog can get at her), to turn and go in the opposite direction.

Between these three tools, you have some options. It's hard for even the best-trained dog to ignore an aggressive little yapper in his face. The more tools you have, the better you can remove your dog from a situation where the BIG dog is almost always going to get blamed for an altercation.

Then, having removed your dog from the situation, you can go back and punt, pass or kick the bad owners.
 

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Where I live I always say it is the little dog capital of the world they are all over town and are running loose some strays and some not. Sometimes I just ignore them but other times I let Max stop and face and greet they usally change there mind and turn tail and run when they see my big pup getting excited and wanting to play. I have had them fall in love with Max and follow me home, ugh that wasn't suppose to happen. One time this little chi acutually bite Max on his muzzle several times Max didn't know what to do he just stared at the little guy and it was actually hillarious to watch (he did not hurt Max at all).

Dawn
 

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Originally Posted By: 3K9Mom...so that you can put your dog into a sit-stay while you move out in front of your dog and "punt, pass or kick" the dog out of your dog's face.
Great stuff 3K9Mom. This post made my Friday!
 
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