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I’ve taken her to the vet before they said it could be a number of different things. I bought her in Seattle WA and moved down to GA and it started here. I thought maybe a food allergy so I’ve tried a number of different foods, nothing changes. Flea treatments do nothing, at this point I think it’s just allergies to something in the air here in GA. The only solution that has worked was a steroid and antibiotic from the vet. I don’t remember the exact kind. Only problem it cost me $150per refill and for a minute I was able to keep up with it but my wife recently stopped working due to pregnancy complications and doesn’t plan to go back to work so I can’t afford the medication. Any natural remedies anyone can suggest? I’ve tried OTC antihistamines but it does nothing, I’ve tried topical solutions to sanitize and moisturize it but it does nothing. I’m on the verge of rehiring her because she seems miserable and I find it irresponsible to keep her if I can’t properly care for her but I really do not want to do that, please help!
 

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Poor Girl!

*Have you tried rubbing in Organic Coconut Oil?
Organic Coconut Oil has Anti-bacterial and Anti-fungal properties.
The Coconut Oil should be: Extra Virgin, Unrefined, Certified Organic, Non GMO, Hexane free.
You can put an old T-shirt on her to keep the coconut oil from getting on the furniture, rugs, etc.

*Have you tried a Raw diet or The Honest Kitchen Dehydrated 100% Human Grade Food for dog's?

*Have you considered testing thyroid levels?
Thyroid problems: "Signs include dull hair coat, loss or thinning of hair, excessive shedding, and an inability to tolerate the cold. Some will have a thickening of the skin and increased skin pigment in areas of friction. Hypothyroid dogs have frequent ear and skin infections, resulting in severe itching and sores on the body from scratching."

Per the Dane Lady: Quote: " It is my opinion, after working with hundreds of cases over many years, that when we are trying to rebalance the system and reduce the yeast/fungus levels in the gut, we have a much higher success rate when the thyroid is working properly. Now the problem is that yeast die-off, known as mycotoxins, actually can destroy the thyroid gland, which is the master lock to the whole glandular system (endocrine system). This is why having an current and accurate thyroid test done is critical to a successful re-balancing of the yeast overgrowth in the digestive tract.
Most veterinarians do not do a complete thyroid panel (5 panel test), nor do they know how to recognize a low normal test. I feel it is of utmost importance that you get a thyroid test analyzed by Dr. Jean Dodds at www.hemopet.org I feel so strongly about this that I often will not do a consultation until pet owners have this thyroid test done before our consultation.”

You will note Dr. Dodds has 4 sections with instructions and forms for you to print out and take to your vet. Your vet will draw the blood and mail it to her labratory and she will send you the accurate results. She does a complete Thyroid Antibody Panel which includes T4, Free T4, T3, Free T# and a TGAA (thyroglobulin autoantibody) test. I really don't recommend going by your vets blood test. But if you have already gone to your own vet and they have run a T-3 and T-4 - look at the numbers, if they are in the middle (50%) range, it is considered low for the giant breeds and you must treat with thyroid meds. You must insist on it. In fact, if your dog is a large/giant breed and it comes back in the middle range say 1-10 and it reads a 5 on your dog, it means it needs to be treated with meds. Ideally a large/giant breed needs to be above the 50% range and on small active dogs it needs to be even higher than that - say on 1-10 range it would need to be a 7-8!" end quote.

Go to hemopet.org and click on Order Test. Click on Online Test Request, scroll down and you’ll see the Thyroid test. You can print out this form and ask your vet to send the sample to Hemopet.

*Black Skin Disease (Alopecia x)?
This disease can be easily confused with "Cushing's Disease." The disease manifests initially as thinning hair, sometimes accompanied by itchy skin and sometimes not, followed by bald patches, followed by blackened or dark gray skin. Eventually, the dog can become completely bald with deep charcoal-gray skin.

*Cushing's Disease?

*Addison's Disease?

*Have you consulted a Dermatologist?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Poor Girl!

*Have you tried rubbing in Organic Coconut Oil?
Organic Coconut Oil has Anti-bacterial and Anti-fungal properties.
The Coconut Oil should be: Extra Virgin, Unrefined, Certified Organic, Non GMO, Hexane free.
You can put an old T-shirt on her to keep the coconut oil from getting on the furniture, rugs, etc.

*Have you tried a Raw diet or The Honest Kitchen Dehydrated 100% Human Grade Food for dog's?

*Have you considered testing thyroid levels?
Thyroid problems: "Signs include dull hair coat, loss or thinning of hair, excessive shedding, and an inability to tolerate the cold. Some will have a thickening of the skin and increased skin pigment in areas of friction. Hypothyroid dogs have frequent ear and skin infections, resulting in severe itching and sores on the body from scratching."

Per the Dane Lady: Quote: " It is my opinion, after working with hundreds of cases over many years, that when we are trying to rebalance the system and reduce the yeast/fungus levels in the gut, we have a much higher success rate when the thyroid is working properly. Now the problem is that yeast die-off, known as mycotoxins, actually can destroy the thyroid gland, which is the master lock to the whole glandular system (endocrine system). This is why having an current and accurate thyroid test done is critical to a successful re-balancing of the yeast overgrowth in the digestive tract.
Most veterinarians do not do a complete thyroid panel (5 panel test), nor do they know how to recognize a low normal test. I feel it is of utmost importance that you get a thyroid test analyzed by Dr. Jean Dodds at www.hemopet.org I feel so strongly about this that I often will not do a consultation until pet owners have this thyroid test done before our consultation.”

You will note Dr. Dodds has 4 sections with instructions and forms for you to print out and take to your vet. Your vet will draw the blood and mail it to her labratory and she will send you the accurate results. She does a complete Thyroid Antibody Panel which includes T4, Free T4, T3, Free T# and a TGAA (thyroglobulin autoantibody) test. I really don't recommend going by your vets blood test. But if you have already gone to your own vet and they have run a T-3 and T-4 - look at the numbers, if they are in the middle (50%) range, it is considered low for the giant breeds and you must treat with thyroid meds. You must insist on it. In fact, if your dog is a large/giant breed and it comes back in the middle range say 1-10 and it reads a 5 on your dog, it means it needs to be treated with meds. Ideally a large/giant breed needs to be above the 50% range and on small active dogs it needs to be even higher than that - say on 1-10 range it would need to be a 7-8!" end quote.

Go to hemopet.org and click on Order Test. Click on Online Test Request, scroll down and you’ll see the Thyroid test. You can print out this form and ask your vet to send the sample to Hemopet.

*Black Skin Disease (Alopecia x)?
This disease can be easily confused with "Cushing's Disease." The disease manifests initially as thinning hair, sometimes accompanied by itchy skin and sometimes not, followed by bald patches, followed by blackened or dark gray skin. Eventually, the dog can become completely bald with deep charcoal-gray skin.

*Cushing's Disease?

*Addison's Disease?

*Have you consulted a Dermatologist?
Thank you this is a lot of good information, I’ll check out the website for the Thyroid levels and start with the coconut oil treatment. Also will be switching her to one of the two foods you listed. I just will be doing a little more research on them. Thank you again this is immensely helpful!
 

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It does look like a form of mange. Intense management needs to be done to totally eradicate it.
Also you should improve the quality of the food you're giving her.
Normally if the diet is good, they can fight off many things.
Try a good semi-raw or home cooked MEAT diet for a few weeks. My son's Husky had perpetual skin and ear problems
til he took his old mama's suggestion and improve the diet w/ semi-raw and VOILA- no more problems.
Your dog needs extra Vitamin A and E and overall better nutrition. When the nutrition is poor, all kinds of problems show up.
Cheap food or poor quality dog food is usually garbage. Give human grade meat.
 
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