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Hi there, our new family member Arman is 1 yrs. old and we have had him for about a month.
we are on 5.5. acres and he is a bit of a runner. Trying to keep him home. He will take off while playing or will just do the sneak if you aren't paying attention. I put up a 3 acres surround sport dog efence. Did the flags. Before I even had a chance to even start training him - he came out with his original ecollar on that has the remote control (the first sytsem we had been using for training) and I didn't realize/or think about it -that it would be active on this new sport dog fence. He got caught up in the shock zone (thank god it was on low) but it totally tripped him out. He ran about 10 feet along the flag line before I get him out. Not good. Later that day - hours later - we started with a short 5 min. session. He quickly figured out the corrective zone in the first area that day. Then we played without the collar and called it good. The next day I took him back out for another 5 min session and this time he refused to go anywhere near the zone. I can't even train him. I thought maybe we would just walk the 3 acre area and I could just touch the flags and tell him no to this area. We did a little and then remembered and wouldn't even let me show him. He was super stressed so we just went inside. Today he played a little ball with me and then after a while I put the ecollar back on for a quick training session and he immediately was not interested. How am I ever going to get him trained if he won't even come anywhere near the flags? I really need this system to work out and am willing to put the work in. I am committed to the dog but need him to be able to roam the acreage a little and not be a runner. I have watched some videos and feel I understand the training recommended but he is refusing to participate. I have been giving him treats and trying to coax him with some play time before and after. THanks
 

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The system did what it is supposed to do. The dog refuses to come near it . GSDs do not need to roam freely. Stay with him and forget about the "fence" and the ecollar for a good while.
Give the dog a break and put him on a long line. Work him in the vicinity where he is still ok. Gradually go closer as long as he is ok. Can take a long time. Do not leave him alone in this area.This story is an example why I hate these supposedly quick fixes. Build a dog chain link typen fence of 5 ft high at least.
 

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Working on the fence this summer. We have 3 wiener dogs also and the GSD came by surprize - a rescue of sorts. He is a nice boy and I would like to make it work. We have been training and he is settling in good. The other dogs have free roam but have had to completely change their lives to adjust to this new dog. No doggie door, no free roam and no spontanous play without a big commotion. I was hoping to be able to let him out for a while and he would not run. He did stay home all day yesterday for Mothers Day, lol. No collar and the doors left open as we were home and enjoying the day. I have invested in the system and am going to continue to try and have it work. I realize they have their shortfalls but they also have success stories as well. I am not a put it up and let him figure it out type of owner. I intend to take the weeks of training that would be needed to make it work. The fence around the 5.5 acres is a huge expense. It is our intention but could take some time to finish the complete project.
 

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The issue with e fences is that they don't keep stuff out. So you still need to watch your dog. My mom had 5 acres, they just fenced an acre of it for their 3 dogs. Still had trouble with wild animals getting in though.

For your current problem, I would keep the collar on him but turn it off, otherwise he is going to associate the collar with being zapped and will sketch out as soon as you put it back on. Put him an a long line to play and watch him. You are looking for an easy way and there isn't one. Work on boundary training while you have him on the long line and go ahead and use the flags for cues.
I don't leave dogs unattended and uncontained, but that's me.
 

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Working on the fence this summer. We have 3 wiener dogs also and the GSD came by surprize - a rescue of sorts. He is a nice boy and I would like to make it work. We have been training and he is settling in good. The other dogs have free roam but have had to completely change their lives to adjust to this new dog. No doggie door, no free roam and no spontanous play without a big commotion. I was hoping to be able to let him out for a while and he would not run. He did stay home all day yesterday for Mothers Day, lol. No collar and the doors left open as we were home and enjoying the day. I have invested in the system and am going to continue to try and have it work. I realize they have their shortfalls but they also have success stories as well. I am not a put it up and let him figure it out type of owner. I intend to take the weeks of training that would be needed to make it work. The fence around the 5.5 acres is a huge expense. It is our intention but could take some time to finish the complete project.
This is the intact dog that is running around doing whatever? This will not stop him from breeding some random female in heat, either he will run through it or she will come to him. I hope you neuter him.
 

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Why was the dog in the old ecollar if you were not using it? How did a different system trigger the old collar? They are supposed to be synced to only one remote or trigger.
 

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See if you can locate the training program used by the Invisible Fence brand. You are missing several very important steps at the outset. I have 3 very high drive working line dogs and not one of them has breached the fence for dogs, joggers, bikers, the mailman, etc., etc.--the oldest is ten and the youngest just over a year. It requires strict adherence to the training regimen. I live in the country and all the neighbors with dogs always walk them on leash, so intrusion into the system has not been an issue except for the occasional deer or skunk...... I would not use one in a more populated area for that reason. After I remove the contact protector and then the impulse reducer from the collar, I use a fairly high stimulus from the beginning. At worst, a couple of the dogs created a much wider safe zone away from the shock zone for a few days, but figured it out on their own.

Good luck
 

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Why was the dog in the old ecollar if you were not using it? How did a different system trigger the old collar? They are supposed to be synced to only one remote or trigger.
It was confusing as to why the old collar would trigger new different system. I had him wearing it because i have been using the vibration as a way to make him focus and come back when called. It works pretty good. He has been listening and following instructions while wearing old ecollar. He was just out near me when his old collar started shocking him from new system. I had not even considered this happening or I would have taken off old collar. I had not read anything like this either so was not prepared for this event. I tried again today with long leash but he is not interested in going out if I put the leash and collar on him. he knows. He is staying home better this past week; ran today in a split second while not looking but came back on his own within 20 min. About the time I realized he got out. I called and he returned. Then he stuck around the rest of the day; no sneaking and trying to leave. I have had a lab, akita and 3 weiner dogs. New to this breed and he might be more than we can deal with. I am not going to give up. i was not just looking for an easy solution; but more like a way to let him be out for a bit without supervision - like all of our dogs in the past could be. Thanks for your response.
 

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Hi Pam,
I have the manual as I bought it new. I was following the instructions on training to the letter. It was the incident with the "other" collar that started things off wrong. Then when actually intending to introduce him to the corrective zone and back to the safe zone is when he deciding it was too much. The manual said not to stress him out too much and do it in small increments of time. That is what I am trying to do. What do you think I am missing from the "onset"? I just don't know how he will ever learn the boundaries if I cannot coax him into even walking near the boundary. My current plan is to stay with the training guide that came with the fence. I was hoping some old pros on this site would have other tips or advice. Thanks for your reply.
 

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It was confusing as to why the old collar would trigger new different system. I had him wearing it because i have been using the vibration as a way to make him focus and come back when called. It works pretty good. He has been listening and following instructions while wearing old ecollar. He was just out near me when his old collar started shocking him from new system. I had not even considered this happening or I would have taken off old collar. I had not read anything like this either so was not prepared for this event. I tried again today with long leash but he is not interested in going out if I put the leash and collar on him. he knows. He is staying home better this past week; ran today in a split second while not looking but came back on his own within 20 min. About the time I realized he got out. I called and he returned. Then he stuck around the rest of the day; no sneaking and trying to leave. I have had a lab, akita and 3 weiner dogs. New to this breed and he might be more than we can deal with. I am not going to give up. i was not just looking for an easy solution; but more like a way to let him be out for a bit without supervision - like all of our dogs in the past could be. Thanks for your response.
Why is he out without the fence collar and a leash on? Isn't letting him run through it setting him up to have to get shocked more to teach him to stay in?

I would think he should not be outside period without you, a long line, and the fence collar. I used to be a dog walker and two dogs that were on my schedule were getting trained to an inivsible fence and my walks with them consisted of exactly that, going around the yard with long lines teaching them the boundaries. Then one week I came back and one of them would not go down off her deck anymore even though the yard was about an acre, because she had finally gotten shocked, and it was pretty sad.

But it sounds like your dog is just making an association with collar and leash instead of the boundary of your property.
 

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New to this breed and he might be more than we can deal with. I am not going to give up. i was not just looking for an easy solution; but more like a way to let him be out for a bit without supervision - like all of our dogs in the past could be. .
Through my rescue work, I have been in many, many rural, suburban, and urban government-run animal shelters (dog pounds) all around my state. I've lost track of the vast number of GSDs I've seen in them picked up stray, wearing electronic fence shock collars. It's a lot of dogs, and many of them were hit by cars before being picked up on the side of the road.

What seems to happen is that the dogs with high prey drive take the shock while chasing a critter -- a squirrel, for example. Then the chase ends, they're out of drive, and they won't go home because they don't want to be shocked again. So they go wander, get hit by cars, attacked by other dogs, or whatever, and eventually are picked up by animal control.

If there's a microchip registered to the owners, then they get called, told what the fine will be, and what the bill will be for stabilizing the dog's injuries (or possibly even doing surgery to treat them). Most never come for the dog after that.

This is a very, very common way for this breed to end up in breed rescue.

Also, please do not underestimate the risk of loose dogs coming onto your property to attack your dog. I know of a GSD puppy who had been tied up in an unfenced yard, and then attacked by a pack of very nasty dogs. The other dogs belonged to his neighbor. They destroyed both of the pup's ears, mangled his face, and shook him so hard they nearly killed him. It took 7 surgeries, and more than $2,000 to save this pup. A sturdy privacy fence creating a safe play yard on part of the property could have been installed for less than the eventual vet bills!
 

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Did you begin with the collar points covered so the dog would hear the warning signal while teaching him to reverse direction and come into the yard when it beeps? I start with a regular leash and walk near the fence boundary while allowing the dog to wander toward the fence. You have to be close enough to hear the tone yourself so you can give whatever command (i.e. "no flag") you use immediately and call him back for a reward. This must be done at dozens of locations along the fence and there must be multiple markers visible to the dog (flags). Once the dog begins to turn back on his own at the sound of the tone, you can switch to a long line and continue the process until the response is reliable. Then add a reducer to the collar points and remove the cover and start again. I start with a fairly high stimulus since mine are high drive and stable. As with a prong correction, it should be quick and meaningful. Once the response is solid, I remove the reducer so they receive the full correction. Softer dogs or those just sensitive to corrections may give the fence area a wide berth for a few days, but will teach themselves what the safe zone is again while just wandering about the property with you.
 

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I would also leave the collar on him with the contacts covered. Just go out and play ball, do OB with food--whatever he loves to do with a long line as a drag until he settles again. Then, move toward the fence without coaxing--just be with him, again until he is relaxed. Once he can be in the yard and remain relaxed, start over. Mine regularly chase deer and rabbits and have never crossed the line. However, there will always be that dog that is willing to take the hit to get at what he wants. Obviously, this type of containment system will not work for him and, again, is not appropriate for more populated areas. It is critical that you know his temperament well to determine when training has been effective since no one can provide really good training advice without eyes on the dog.
 
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