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When reading about an otherwise perfect sire I noticed it says "although functionally sound one elbow didn't certify" though the hips are certified 'good' as per the OFA database. How worrisome is this and does this mean he may have/get elbow dysplasia and therefore his offspring will be predisposed to it, or are there other reasons to not certify an elbow?

I did some searching and as far back as I look in the pedigree for siblings and sire/dam all results are normal/normal.
 

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Any bad elbow is not good. I would take bad hips over bad elbow any day. Dog should not be used for breeding IMO.
 

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If the dog does not have passing orthopedics then he shouldn't be bred.
 

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OFA says there is an increased genetic predisposition for ED if a parent has it as well. Even dogs with passing elbows/hips can throw bad joints - it's no guarantee. There are genetic and environmental components to the diseases. Does your contract have a hips and elbows guarantee?

As to whether or not a dog should be bred...that is a topic of varying opinion. Some think no, it's not worth the risk. Some think if the dog brings enough to the table, why toss them out of the gene pool (especially if they are not lame a day in their life).
A thing to think about...some elbows rated by the SV would come back DJD1 by OFA.

How many breeders who import an older dog with SV a-stamp, pay for xrays and resubmit to OFA for additional ratings? Genuinely curious. I could be wrong, but I don't know too many that do.
 

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It's quite common for breeders to resubmit to the SV if the orthopedics are questionable and borderline through the ofa
 

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I’ve read long discussions (arguments) between breeders on this very subject. One breeder bred a dog with failing elbows but only because the fail wasn’t genetic. She had proof that an injury was sustained when the pup was younger that caused the one elbow to end up dysplastic. Other than the failed elbows, the dog had a champion confirmation title as well as obedience and hunt titles. Other breeders claimed that it didn’t matter. Failed elbows means the dog shouldn’t be bred. But why? If it isn’t genetic, it doesn’t increase the offspring’s risk. It went back and forth for a loooong time.

If the dog is otherwise an amazing specimen, all the siblings and other dogs in the pedigree have solid hips/elbows, and the breeder is typically extremely reputable, I’d at least listen to the reasoning from the breeder. It all comes down to how you feel about it. It’s not hard to move on and find another breeder with dogs that pass every health test.
 
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