German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Today is graduation in Timber's OB class. In a week, Intermediate classes begin. So, after class last week I asked the trainer what we would be learning in Intermediate and she said "basically what we learned here, but getting it all down to a science".

Let me back up and say that I had high intentions to keep Timber involved in all the classes. Everything they had to offer.

But now that I know what intermediate class will be, Im kind of backing out. One because of the money (although its not about the money) and two because I know I can reinforce everything we've learned at home. Like Im thinking " I dont need to pay for a class to do that".

Timber gets walked two miles a day and on the weekends I take him to places where he is exposed to other dogs and new people. Sometimes we work really good on training at home and other times, I dont have a lot of time. Ive got three kids who keep me pretty busy.

So, whats your opinion on the intermediate class. Do you think its still vital in its own way?
Enlighten me. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
I also wanted to add:

Should we maybe even consider private classes for things I DONT know how to address?

I just liked the fact that Timber was around other dogs in regular classes. However, he is more focused on them and barking here and there at them than paying attention to class. LOL
He does really good at home. On a walk, at a park or just outside. But put him around all those other dogs...especially the little ones.....and Timber acts like he hasnt learned a whole lot. LOL
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
27,460 Posts
I would absolutely continue. There is no way you can duplicate the distractions that a group class just naturally involves, let alone those a good instructor can add. Just having other people in the room means they can toss treats when you are heeling, play ball when you are heeling....

Plus, it's definitely a case of 'you don't know what you don't know' and a good instructor can instantly give small hints and tips the first sign of a problem, that you can use and adjust, and then there never IS a real problem because you prevented it from being learned 'wrong' and having to later come up with a much more problemic fix.

I also have made friends over the years in dog classes to hear about upcoming dog events. That's how I got into both therapy dog work and agility. I still have friends that I meet for dog walks/hikes/barbeques that we know each others dogs and can all attend. REally important is THEY can take my dogs if I go out of town with no worries, and I can take THEIR dogs if they have to leave. Huge comfort to know my dogs are in a safe home having a blast when I have to leave them (I have never had to pay and use a commercial kennel)

So if your instructor is awful, I'd look for new classes. And if you get bored with obedience, I'd also look for other classes in the area (herding, rally, flyball, tracking, AGILITY......) so you can keep up training/socialization/dog stuff.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
21,368 Posts
I agree with MRL, we can never learn enough, our dogs can never be exposed to enough.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,228 Posts
When Panzer finished basic obedience, we signed up for Canine Good Citizen classes. We definitely formally practice more when we're enrolled in a class. He's the youngest dog in the CGC class, but he did well last night (1st class).

You could opt for a different type of class, as the others have said too. Then pursue intermediate obedience later. I don't think you (or me) would ever be sorry we took too many classes. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
241 Posts
Besides, with three kids in the house, isnt it nice to get out and do "just the training". I am sure your house has more distractions then any trainer can provide, but with the time you have reinforcing what you have learned with the trainer, it may make one less distraction at your home.

Good Luck with what ever your choice!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,933 Posts
I agree with everyone else. You will see a much more solid dog in it's obedience after the next series. Even though it sounds like 'more of the same', it will make a difference and you'll be gald you did it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,991 Posts
I would absolutely continue. There is no way you can duplicate the distractions that a group class just naturally involves, let alone those a good instructor can add. Just having other people in the room means they can toss treats when you are heeling, play ball when you are heeling....

Plus, it's definitely a case of 'you don't know what you don't know' and a good instructor can instantly give small hints and tips the first sign of a problem, that you can use and adjust, and then there never IS a real problem because you prevented it from being learned 'wrong' and having to later come up with a much more problemic fix.

I also have made friends over the years in dog classes to hear about upcoming dog events. That's how I got into both therapy dog work and agility. I still have friends that I meet for dog walks/hikes/barbeques that we know each others dogs and can all attend. REally important is THEY can take my dogs if I go out of town with no worries, and I can take THEIR dogs if they have to leave. Huge comfort to know my dogs are in a safe home having a blast when I have to leave them (I have never had to pay and use a commercial kennel)

So if your instructor is awful, I'd look for new classes. And if you get bored with obedience, I'd also look for other classes in the area (herding, rally, flyball, tracking, AGILITY......) so you can keep up training/socialization/dog stuff.
Agreed with all of the above.

Plus you might look into whether your club has an advanced group, agility class, or something to that effect. Ours does but in order to be in them you have to graduate novice training.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,078 Posts
Continue with the classes.

"I just liked the fact that Timber was around other dogs in regular classes. However, he is more focused on them and barking here and there at them than paying attention to class. LOL
He does really good at home. On a walk, at a park or just outside. But put him around all those other dogs...especially the little ones.....and Timber acts like he hasnt learned a whole lot. LOL "

This is the reason to continue with classes.

My dog is perfect, at home.

My dog is not perfect in other places - she's good but not the way she is at home. You have to keep upping the distraction level and class is a great way, because you cannot control it.

For me, classes keep me practising. And I learn a little bit with each class.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I just wanted to say that Im going to take ya'lls advice.
In our graduation class today we practiced going through tunnels and all that kind of fun stuff. That was the first we had done.
However, towards the end of class the trainer had a lady and her Rottie there to "show" us what will be involved in Intermediate class.
The dog did perfect heels, downs and sits and turns. Its exactly what I DO want Timber to learn right now. So, perfect!!! Plus I love the attention the dog was giving her owner. I love to see that.
Thanks Everyone. I knew there was a reason I come here for answers! ;)
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top