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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Just had a thought....

It doesn't take much for a dog to come running out of someone's house, and appear to either protect his home, or simply get too ramped up. I've personally seen my dog look downright scary, but I know that she's afraid of her own shadow..

After watching a few of these videos posted, and witnessing law enforcement "shoot to kill", I was wondering if any of you more experienced folks here, could have or would have been able to avoid killing the dog, by simply knowing how to restrain or ward off a dog?

Just the other day, I witnessed an off leash charging Great Dane about to (appear to) attack a leashed medium sized dog. The owner of the Great Dane was screaming in panic, as he approached the other dog.
That other owner (believe it or not), was prepared for this, and pulled out an airhorn, and blasted the dog in his face. The dog stopped dead in his tracks.
Afterwards, she said she had experienced a dog attack before, and will not walk out the house without her horn.

There seems to be an increase in dog attacks, and I was wondering if you think law enforcement should be trained to restrain or ward off an attack?

Your thoughts?
 

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Wouldnt it have an effect on your own dog if you set off an airhorn every time another dog approached. Surely better to let them meet and then if there is a problem deal with it.most off lead dogs dont want a fight and will avoid confrontation given the freedom to do so.
 

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I think the problem would be in taking the chance that it doesn't work and the dog doesn't stop. A stick, baton, mace, air horn, etc. are all deterrents but there's no guarantee that it'll work with every dog
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Wouldnt it have an effect on your own dog if you set off an airhorn every time another dog approached. Surely better to let them meet and then if there is a problem deal with it.most off lead dogs dont want a fight and will avoid confrontation given the freedom to do so.
Yes, I agree.

I think the problem would be in taking the chance that it doesn't work and the dog doesn't stop. A stick, baton, mace, air horn, etc. are all deterrents but there's no guarantee that it'll work with every dog
I agree with this too.

It just seems that many LEO act in a state of panic.

I was trained many years ago in self defense and martial arts, and one of the benefits is being able to maintain composure, and responding to a threat in a controlled manner.

Don't get me wrong... A charging PB or GSD can be frightening, but I've red many threads here on GSF, describing ways to ward off an attacking dog, without further incident.

Just wondering.
 

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I think they are already trained to minimize the damage - they shoot the dog if there is a threat. Unfortunately, it's only in hindsight where we can sit here and watch video clips and say the dog was only doing this or wasn't going to do that....I'm pretty sure that LEO will shoot a dog at large that charges at someone or impedes the LEO in doing whatever he was called to the scene to do.

This is why as a GSD owner I spend a lot of time, money, planning, etc making sure my dogs are kept secure and under control. I know that most people see my dog and assume he could be a threat or dangerous and honestly I don't blame them. Yesterday on my neighborhood Facebook page someone posted that they saw a German Shepherd walking at large. Now I leave my dogs at home behind locked doors. They have no access to my yard but even if they did, the yard is secured as well. For some reason I read that post and still worried that somehow my dog got out and was causing trouble even though it was impossible unless someone trespassed through multiple gates/locked doors and released the dog, but that's just how much concern I have that my dogs are properly contained. And my dogs have no bite history and are extremely well socialized.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I think they are already trained to minimize the damage - they shoot the dog if there is a threat. Unfortunately, it's only in hindsight where we can sit here and watch video clips and say the dog was only doing this or wasn't going to do that....I'm pretty sure that LEO will shoot a dog at large that charges at someone or impedes the LEO in doing whatever he was called to the scene to do.

This is why as a GSD owner I spend a lot of time, money, planning, etc making sure my dogs are kept secure and under control. I know that most people see my dog and assume he could be a threat or dangerous and honestly I don't blame them. Yesterday on my neighborhood Facebook page someone posted that they saw a German Shepherd walking at large. Now I leave my dogs at home behind locked doors. They have no access to my yard but even if they did, the yard is secured as well. For some reason I read that post and still worried that somehow my dog got out and was causing trouble even though it was impossible unless someone trespassed through multiple gates/locked doors and released the dog, but that's just how much concern I have that my dogs are properly contained. And my dogs have no bite history and are extremely well socialized.
Yes, I agree with this.
So I guess there is no clear cut answer.
 

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If a LEO is restraining a dog then the most important part of their body, their gun hand, is unavailable. Say for example a homeowner sics their dog on the LEO that shows up to serve a warrant. The LEO then attempts to "restrain" the dog (I'm not even sure how you would expect them to do that, realistically) while the homeowner follows the dog out the door with a shotgun aimed at the officer. If the officer had neutralized the dog first (yes, shot it) then he would be able to more effectively deal with the armed subject. If the officer has a dog in his arms, he risks not only injury to himself from the dog's teeth but also from the subject holding the weapon. Yes, this is a more extreme example...but LEOs are trained for the worst case scenarios. This is another reason a lot of times animal control officers, if they aren't sworn LEOs, arrive on the scene of potentially volatile situations WITH an armed LEO.

As I stated in another thread, pepper spray has been shown to not always be effective on dogs and the consequence is that the officer is then exposed to the spray themselves (this happens in MANY scenarios where pepper spray is used).

As far as a taser goes, not all departments carry them, and they are used to acquire control over a non-compliant subject...the pain stops the subject and the verbal commands given by the LEO are what do the controlling. A dog cannot understand these same commands and is simply feeling the pain from the shock. YES, that might work...maybe.

Is injury to a person, potentially life-threatening, more important than the life of an aggressive dog? Eh, I'm a HUGE dog lover but sometimes there are hard choices that need to be made in a split second.
 

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My husband has several friends in law enforcement. Many own dogs, including GSD's. I think the last thing they would want to do is to shoot a dog. But it really comes down to whether they feel threatened or not. I asked a highway patrol officer how he handles car stops with dogs, he asks if they are friendly or not, but knows a "friendly" dog may turn on him in an instant. Friendly or not does not matter, it is the owner's responsibility to keep the dog restrained. The officer said, if the dog gets out of the car and starts charging him, he is going to shoot it.

You mentioned keeping calm. I have seen officers training with the K9 unit be instructed to stay calm, if during the excitement in these realistic training situations the K9 bites an officer in error.

The air horn seems like a good tool to have instead of pepper spray for my own personal use. The next time I see one of my husband's police friends, I'll ask about the air horn.
 

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Police officers are out of the their vehicles to do a job. There is not money enough without raising taxes to ensure every police officer, everywhere is trained and equiped to manage every type of dog-issue there is.

Usually AC or a Dog Warden who IS trained to manage dog-issues is deployed to a dog-situation. If a police officer is on the scene, it is either because the people with the training are over-matched or they are there doing a different job, and they should not be impeded by some dog-owner's dog.

We dog owners have to be more responsible with our dogs. If our dogs are not running up to an LEO or a little old lady or a kid, our dogs are NOT getting shot by police officers. The answer is simple -- dog owners have to be better at managing their dogs.

It is NOT just ok for a dog to rush out a front door toward anyone! We can train a dog to stay on the porch, we can train a dog to not go out of a door first, we can train a dog he needs his leash to go out the front door. Even if we have kids, maybe even moreso if we have kids, we can train our dogs.

I don't expect police departments in the entire country to spend money on trying to minimize the damage that they do to irresponsible owner's dogs.

Because we have dogs, other people with dogs talk to us, run into us, we need to educate dog owners. We need to encourage people to train their dogs, take them to classes. We need to encourage trainers to suggest training dogs not to forge through open doors.

This is a problem that dog owners should solve. People who lose their dogs because they got run over in the street or shot by a cop -- what's the difference. Maybe you can train and equip all the cops in the country, but how does that stop your dog from becoming road pizza?

We have to be smarter, more responsible. Nobody is responsible for my dog's safety but me.
 

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On the other hand, managing dogs when entering a residence/property for any reason should be a part of LEOs training.

I mean if they are doing a raid on a dope dealer and a few pit bulls are shot in the process, most of us aren't losing too much sleep over it, but if they hit the wrong house -- then we wonder if maybe they shouldn't kill dogs just because they are there.

Most of us can keep our dogs safe by following Chris Rock's advice, Obey The Law! And if they get the wrong address, and our dog gets shot and killed it would be terribly tragic, but it is also terribly tragic when lightning strikes or there is a car accident and our dog dies. I don't think it happens enough to lose sleep over.

If the cops are entering a property/dwelling for something that is not an emergency, then they should call for AC, and try to minimize any damage to resident dogs.

If police are entering due to a medical emergency, it would be sad, but cops shouldn't wait for a catch pole or AC if someone is having an emergency.
 

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there seems to be an increase in dog attacks, and i was wondering if you think law enforcement should be trained to restrain or ward off an attack?

Your thoughts?
yes
 
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