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I'm a bit worried that you (the OP) are not actually seeing the reality of this situation. A puppy should be able to RUN... not just HOP. In the videos this pup looks like it can barely walk. I fear that you are glossing over a major problem that should not be ignored for the sake of this dog. Don't take this personally. Nobody is blaming you, but you really do need to open your eyes and see the problem that is before you.
 

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So while I agree she may have some issue, I can't say I've noticed any issue with a her spine, nor has anyone else that has been around her. . Can't help but think it might be my cruddy filming skills combined with her posture. I might be wrong but I don't know, the spine talk came as a shock to me frankly.
And yet you said she could barely stand up the first few days you had her.
That is NOT normal!
Indeed, she looks like she is in a permanent poop squat,

You can blame it on filming skills, but that would be being in denial. Again, good luck, I have no more to comment.
I leave you with a German video that says more than any words any of us can say.
Fast forward to 9:00 for movement.

 

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I’m just shocked at how a vet could see this dog and not express any concern to the owner over its structure. This is not even the first poster to say they’ve taken their dog with serious structural problems to a vet and have the vet not say anything to them. Where do these vets come from?
 

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This dog has some major issues going on. I would guess some neurological issue. Could be back, neck or something else. I don’t think it’s some structural thing that will change or get better simply with age. I would not only be looking for what’s wrong, but the quality of life the dog could have. I’m no expert breeder or vet, but that’s my opinion on the situation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
I'm a bit worried that you (the OP) are not actually seeing the reality of this situation. A puppy should be able to RUN... not just HOP. In the videos this pup looks like it can barely walk. I fear that you are glossing over a major problem that should not be ignored for the sake of this dog. Don't take this personally. Nobody is blaming you, but you really do need to open your eyes and see the problem that is before you.
Oh no I know something is more than likely not right, I've known that from the start. I'm just not sure how I could have missed a structural problem so easily. I'm definitely not ignoring it or I don't think I would have made this post, but from what I've experienced with her I have been pretty certain there's something up with her back legs and her posture, but not her back itself. Because as I stated earlier, she has made extreme progress and looks like a different dog from when I got her, she was in a much worse "squat", couldn't figure out how to properly squat to pee, would not stand up usually either, and seems to be progressing greatly the more we work on exercise. That's why I'm at a loss over it being pointed to her spine itself, because I don't feel like we'd make as much progress if it was her back itself. Don't know if that makes sense but it's obviously a shock to me that everybody sees something I didn't. Doesn't mean I'm not taking it srs.
 

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Oh no I know something is more than likely not right, I've known that from the start. I'm just not sure how I could have missed a structural problem so easily. I'm definitely not ignoring it or I don't think I would have made this post, but from what I've experienced with her I have been pretty certain there's something up with her back legs and her posture, but not her back itself. Because as I stated earlier, she has made extreme progress and looks like a different dog from when I got her, she was in a much worse "squat", couldn't figure out how to properly squat to pee, would not stand up usually either, and seems to be progressing greatly the more we work on exercise. That's why I'm at a loss over it being pointed to her spine itself, because I don't feel like we'd make as much progress if it was her back itself. Don't know if that makes sense but it's obviously a shock to me that everybody sees something I didn't. Doesn't mean I'm not taking it srs.
I'm glad you're taking it seriously, but my only question is if she couldn't walk when you got her.....why didn't that warrant a vet visit in itself? If I received a puppy that couldn't walk I'd assume something was very wrong and an immediate vet trip would be ensued about the problem, and if the vet didn't mention anything I'd find a different vet, I'm sorry the first one failed you, but anyone who's seen a normal moving dog would know something was wrong with her, I'm glad she's made progress, but that doesn't mean there isn't something else wrong, this doesn't seem like a problem she will just grow out of.

As for her spine, I couldn't tell you, but from the videos you've shown it looks like it's deformed in some way, which would explain why you've made progress, I'm guessing as a puppy she wasn't coordinated enough to walk like that, I know my boy as a pup wouldn't have been able to stand up properly on legs like that either, he could barely stand properly on four! As she's grown up she's gotten a bit stronger and figured out how to move around, it doesn't necessarily mean her wellbeing is improving, if you get what I mean.

Once again I'm not trying to be rude or hostile at all, just trying to paint the whole picture of why it's a problem that should be taken up with the vet asap
 

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Are you worried about the costs of treatment, given it is possible,? This is going to be costly unless you ignore the problem. She must be in pain with a posture like this. Dogs hide their pain. Stop guessing, talking yourself out of this issue because it is serious. You made the mistake to take her home so now she is yours and your responsibility to do right by her, no matter what that looks like. We are are not doggy PTs so hire a good Ortho vet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
I’m just shocked at how a vet could see this dog and not express any concern to the owner over its structure. This is not even the first poster to say they’ve taken their dog with serious structural problems to a vet and have the vet not say anything to them. Where do these vets come from?
I have no idea tbh, maybe it's the breeds peculiar posture itself that confuses them as it confused me, but I would expect different from a trained professional. If anyone is in the Dallas TX area and has a good vet suggestion, I'd appreciate it tho.
 

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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
I'm glad you're taking it seriously, but my only question is if she couldn't walk when you got her.....why didn't that warrant a vet visit in itself? If I received a puppy that couldn't walk I'd assume something was very wrong and an immediate vet trip would be ensued about the problem, and if the vet didn't mention anything I'd find a different vet, I'm sorry the first one failed you, but anyone who's seen a normal moving dog would know something was wrong with her, I'm glad she's made progress, but that doesn't mean there isn't something else wrong, this doesn't seem like a problem she will just grow out of.

As for her spine, I couldn't tell you, but from the videos you've shown it looks like it's deformed in some way, which would explain why you've made progress, I'm guessing as a puppy she wasn't coordinated enough to walk like that, I know my boy as a pup wouldn't have been able to stand up properly on legs like that either, he could barely stand properly on four! As she's grown up she's gotten a bit stronger and figured out how to move around, it doesn't necessarily mean her wellbeing is improving, if you get what I mean.

Once again I'm not trying to be rude or hostile at all, just trying to paint the whole picture of why it's a problem that should be taken up with the vet asap
As dumb as it sounds, and maybe I was gullible, but the person I received her from assured me the vet said it was something she'd grow out of. Not knowing anything about the breed, I didn't know much better. She could walk but was in an extreme squat. Now, not so much so I assumed she was growing out of it like I was told. I still have hope she will grow into it better if medical intervention doesn't help. She can walk faster than me oddly enough, which wouldn't be obvious from my clips
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
Are you worried about the costs of treatment, given it is possible,? This is going to be costly unless you ignore the problem. She must be in pain with a posture like this. Dogs hide their pain. Stop guessing, talking yourself out of this issue because it is serious. You made the mistake to take her home so now she is yours and your responsibility to do right by her, no matter what that looks like. We are are not doggy PTs so hire a good Ortho vet.
I mean, I wouldn't consider taking a dog in need home a mistake but ok. I know she functions like a normal puppy and plays and is happy despite it, I am with her every day, you, yourself also can't assume things especially based on a collective 33 seconds of video. Hostility isn't necessary, nor is trying to convince me if my dog is in pain or not.
 

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The posture you are concerned about may be the result of a spinal deformity.

Her spine curls down in a C shape, instead of staying straight to her tail. That is causing her rear end to come forward underneath her, creating that squat.

She may have been born this way or maybe it was caused by a serious injury. A good vet should be able to tell you that.

I'm glad she is better than she was, but I doubt she will ever be anywhere near normal.

As for being in pain, how can anyone know for sure? Even with people it can be impossible to tell if they don't say they are hurting.

She seems to flatten or drop her ears when she moves. That can be a sign of pain.
 

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Her condition could be very expensive to treat over the long run. Are you prepared for that? Attachment is one thing but you aren’t doing her any favors if she can’t have a decent quality of life. It’s not a failure if you give up the dog. Are you willing to keep a dog into old age who can never run without pain or have a normal life? You haven’t had her that long. I know we are all dog lovers and get attached to puppies very quickly but this may not end well. You could be facing a lot of heartache.
 

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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
The posture you are concerned about may be the result of a spinal deformity.

Her spine curls down in a C shape, instead of staying straight to her tail. That is causing her rear end to come forward underneath her, creating that squat.

She may have been born this way or maybe it was caused by a serious injury. A good vet should be able to tell you that.

I'm glad she is better than she was, but I doubt she will ever be anywhere near normal.

As for being in pain, how can anyone know for sure? Even with people it can be impossible to tell if they don't say they are hurting.

She seems to flatten or drop her ears when she moves. That can be a sign of pain.
Oh yeah, she doesn't show any symptoms that's the only way I myself can try to tell, that's probably another reason why I haven't thought too much of it until now. She plays, barks, harasses my older dog to play and anything else I'd expect of a normal pup. I obviously can't know for sure either but she always has her ears in their goofy out-to-the-side position and is more playful than other pups I've had, so overall whether it bothers her physically or not, I can't be certain but she is very happy so her quality of life doesn't seem compromised, but again Im not in her body so I can't be certain, I can only look out for symptoms of being in pain I suppose, just like with any animal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
Her condition could be very expensive to treat over the long run. Are you prepared for that? Attachment is one thing but you aren’t doing her any favors if she can’t have a decent quality of life. It’s not a failure if you give up the dog. Are you willing to keep a dog into old age who can never run without pain or have a normal life? You haven’t had her that long. I know we are all dog lovers and get attached to puppies very quickly but this may not end well. You could be facing a lot of heartache.
If a vet told me she's in pain and there was no fix for her pain, then I would consider it, but like I've said she shows no indication she's in pain or unhappy, she honestly gets around just as good as any other dog, EXCEPT that she can't run good but otherwise behaves like a happy puppy. I wouldn't feel right if I put down a dog just because they can't run if they were otherwise happy and healthy, you know? I don't base the worth for my pets lives on if theyre normal or not. Because that's the only way it effects her that I can tell, I can get a vet to confirm or deny that she's not in pain then I'll go from there, but what's crucial to me is she's not in pain and she's happy.
 

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If a vet told me she's in pain and there was no fix for her pain, then I would consider it, but like I've said she shows no indication she's in pain or unhappy, she honestly gets around just as good as any other dog, EXCEPT that she can't run good but otherwise behaves like a happy puppy. I wouldn't feel right if I put down a dog just because they can't run if they were otherwise happy and healthy, you know? I don't base the worth for my pets lives on if theyre normal or not. Because that's the only way it effects her that I can tell, I can get a vet to confirm or deny that she's not in pain then I'll go from there, but what's crucial to me is she's not in pain and she's happy.
You're exactly right! What's most important is her quality of life and I'm very glad you gave her a home that cares about her wellbeing, although you haven't been on quite the right track with vet care. I have lots of experience with rescues, I've never really had anything else until Charlie, so I understand taking dogs with potential health issues in, and it never felt like a mistake because they gave me many wonderful companions over the years, just came with a few more behavior issues and vet bills lol

But I would get her to a vet asap to get a diagnosis and see if there's anything they can do to help, but, as others have said, vet bills could really start stacking up pretty high for such a condition so I'd try to establish a relationship with a good vet, work out a budget and see what you can do to help her out, and start thinking over if you are prepared to take care of this dog into her senior years or even a couple years into the future, since most problems get worse with age, especially ones like hers, it could be lots of heartache, as LuvShepherds said
 

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So how can we help you @taylorelisemoon?
100% of the responses have been in the realm of this puppy having a serious deformity, absolute reason to be concerned / worried (your original question) and recommendations to see a vet, more specifically an ortho specialist……

Yet you still defend that the pup has a wonderful quality of life doing all the things you’ve expect in a pup and are admittedly still trying to convince yourself that it can possibly be written off as something she’ll grow out of.

There is no amount of poor angle or low video quality that could EVER make any dogs i’ve seen (thousands) look like this. To be honest, you’d be lucky if it’s only hip dysplasia.
 

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Discussion Starter · #59 ·
So how can we help you @taylorelisemoon?
100% of the responses have been in the realm of this puppy having a serious deformity, absolute reason to be concerned / worried (your original question) and recommendations to see a vet, more specifically an ortho specialist……

Yet you still defend that the pup has a wonderful quality of life doing all the things you’ve expect in a pup and are admittedly still trying to convince yourself that it can possibly be written off as something she’ll grow out of.

There is no amount of poor angle or low video quality that could EVER make any dogs i’ve seen (thousands) look like this. To be honest, you’d be lucky if it’s only hip dysplasia.
The only thing I wanted was to know if it was normal or not lol, that's been addressed that apparently it isn't. But, I didn't ask people to kind of imply I should have her put down because of it, even if her quality of life seems good, so of course I defended my pup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #60 ·
You're exactly right! What's most important is her quality of life and I'm very glad you gave her a home that cares about her wellbeing, although you haven't been on quite the right track with vet care. I have lots of experience with rescues, I've never really had anything else until Charlie, so I understand taking dogs with potential health issues in, and it never felt like a mistake because they gave me many wonderful companions over the years, just came with a few more behavior issues and vet bills lol

But I would get her to a vet asap to get a diagnosis and see if there's anything they can do to help, but, as others have said, vet bills could really start stacking up pretty high for such a condition so I'd try to establish a relationship with a good vet, work out a budget and see what you can do to help her out, and start thinking over if you are prepared to take care of this dog into her senior years or even a couple years into the future, since most problems get worse with age, especially ones like hers, it could be lots of heartache, as LuvShepherds said
Thanks for being so understanding peachy. Kind of sucks that it feels like a lot of comments think I should just prepare to have her put down, even after I say she has good life quality😪. I regret not doing more sooner now, but since she's still a baby I think intervention would help if there's anything that can be fixed. If not, it wouldn't be the first time I had a dog with issues so I'd just rather give her a good life, even if it becomes limited.
 
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