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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 1.5 year old Alaskan husky and she refuses to come to us when she is off her tie out. On her tie out, she comes right away. She knows the command, she's just stubborn. I've never had a dog that couldn't learn this. Even in a fenced in yard she wont come unless she is on her tie out. How can I improve this?
 

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good luck, I had a husky for a few years and was never able to have him come off leash...they are very independant dogs.

My shepherd is also being stubborn with it as well so if you learn the magic phrase please share!
 

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Siberian Huskies are known to be extremely independent. When I was teaching my ex boyfriends husky I put her on her leash and taught her that coming to me is very good using high value treats and a clicker, when she understood come without me reminding her by a pull on the leash i moved to a long leash doing the same thing until i was at the end of the leash, I then took her to an enclosed area repeated the long leash process, then moved to off leash and when she came I made a huge deal about it using my boyfriend's left over steak as a high value treat (dog loved it he did not lol). the whole process took about a couple of months, but I worked on it every day through out the day. It took a lot of patience. Even though she knew come she still couldn't be trusted off leash because Huskies do wonder and do have a mind of their own. I would invest in obedience classes. :) good luck!
 

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If there is someone there to show you how to use it, you might think about an e-collar for training.
I agree, some people are against them but--an e-collar will work quickly and easily if used right.

Instead of spending hours and hours training for several months, I personally would get an e-collar and be done with it. I've had success in a matter of just a couple of hours. Think of all the other cool things that can be taught in the extra time that would have been dedicated to just "come" :D
 

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I agree, some people are against them but--an e-collar will work quickly and easily if used right.

Instead of spending hours and hours training for several months, I personally would get an e-collar and be done with it. I've had success in a matter of just a couple of hours. Think of all the other cool things that can be taught in the extra time that would have been dedicated to just "come" :D
whats an e collar?
 

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An e-collar is short for Electronic collar. Electronic collars vibrate, make a noise, give an electric stimulation ("stim") or any combination of these. I have nothing against e-collars! (just fyi ;) )

However, I have been fairly successfull just using a long line and consistancy. Instead of teaching a sit/stay/come, allow your dog to be at the end of a six foot leash just hanging out sniffing the grass with you holding on to the handle of the leash.

When Daisy is distracted and not paying any attention to you, say her name (once), tell her to come (once), start running backwards/facing her as you praise her in a happy tone of voice. You want to put "Daisy, Come!" closely together and immediately start moving. Don't wait on her. The leash you are holding will give a little collar "Pop/Correction" if she didn't immediately start running to you. This is good!

When she catches you (it is a game to her at this point of course) feed her something FABULOUS -while the back of your hand is touching your leg. When she finishes her treat, tell her good girl and go play to let her know she doesn't have to remain right next to you. Repeat this for a few days. Soon she won't want to get too far from you because you have the praise/attention and yummy treats.

When Daisy gets to the point of responding to "Daisy, Come!" so fast that the leash doesn't get tight to give the collar "pop/correction", you will need to get a longer leash. A retractable leash or a long line a length of your choosing would be fine. You then repeat everything as you did with the 6 foot leash but now she is distracted when she is 15-50 feet away from you (depending on length of leash).

Practice everywhere, among every distraction you can come up with. When you are confident, use the long line but instead of holding the end, drop the end and let her drag the line.

There are a few other things I do with my dogs and my students dogs, but this is beginning of getting a great recall.

I hope this helps!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I appreciate everyone's help, but the problem is if she is attached to a leash, tie out, anything really- She comes every time. She knows the command. It is just when she is off it, she would rather not come. She thinks its a game and would rather stay outside. I used to have an E collar and I didnt like using it. I dont think it would work on her anyway, nothing seems to, except out smarting her, which isnt always easy to do. She knows many commands, she is extremely smart. She just doesnt want to come when she feels any freedom.
 

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I'd bet if you put her on a 30 ft long line, ignored her (fenced in area of course), the long line was on the ground (you not holding it), she wouldn't come. You can make a line out of clothesline or climbers nylon rope to have a line that is not as heavy.

The other thing I teach my dogs, when I put my hand out, I am going to take ahold of your collar. My dogs have to stay standing where they are when they see my hand out or come to me. No other choices. This I start working on in the house first in one room so I am not chasing them all over lol.

In a moderately sized room, I have my dog off leash. I place my hand out, palm facing out (toward the dog) about waist level (kinda low). I say nothing and just walk toward my dog with a smile on my face. No rush, normal walk. If my dog doesn't move and I am able to take ahold of his/her collar, I praise/pet/treat then release and ignore them again. I do this several times. If my dog runs away as I am walking toward them, I say nothing, I do not speed up, I do not chase them. I calmly keep my hand out, smile on my face and casually continue following no matter which direction they go. Eventually, they realize it is not a chase game (I never run after them or make "grabbing" motions). They get bored and stop. When I touch them, it is praise/pet/treat/etc and I let them go again!

This is much easier done in the house to start (less places for most dogs to play keep away lol) but can be done in the enclosed/fenced in yard/area with the condition of having a long line on.

Even if she always comes to you while on a line of some kind, at least if you go back and teach her this signal that means to stop and wait for me to touch you (or come - whichever your dog offers the most is what I would use... the majority of mine do stop and wait) you'll always have a way of catching her even if she doesn't want to "come".
 

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I believe your main key to get her to come to you off leash is if you make a huge deal when she comes on command on leash or tie-out. Something that she didnt have for a while, like small pieces of hotdogs, steak, venision, sausage, pieces of chicken. And do this only for that command as start. Hope it helps.
 

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Find an irresistable treat and use it every time you call until he responds every time. Then g r a d u a l l y phase out the treat.
 

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Find an irresistable treat and use it every time you call until he responds every time. Then g r a d u a l l y phase out the treat.
I would also try that.

Added to the fact that if 100% I call my dog and then go into the BORING house. Then my dog will stop coming too.

But if I call my pup, give it a treat, then let it go................... call my pup, give it a treat, let it go.......................... call my pup, give it a treat, go indoors and run to the treat jar to give a treat............. I get more success.

BTW, is your dog 100% in dog class both off and on leash? Just not in the yard? Your instructor can probably give you good tips to help in the yard too cause they know you and your dog.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
My dog is not in any obedience classes. I think I will try getting her to come to me several times and rewarding her with a treat before making her come in.
 

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I dont think anyone has asked but how long have you had your dog? I got mine about two months ago and realized I expected way too much too fast. I dont know what did it but something must have clicked with her because the past couple days shes been coming straight to me outside with little to no hesitation. I still keep her lead on so it trails behind her but I've made tremendous progress out of the blue. Patience and consistency seem to pay off, it just takes time.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I've had her since she was almost 7 weeks old. We've been working with her ever since then. I realize that a part of the problem is that she doesn't get anywhere near enough exercise. She is bred to pull sleds so she is extremely high energy. She is terrible on a leash when the other dogs come and in the winter it is impossible to take them because of the ice. Any ideas on other exercise choices?
 

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I've found fetch and frisbee to be the fastest way to wear out my pup. I'll take two balls (or frisbees) out with me; throw one, he gets it, drops it at my feet, runs around me, and I immediately throw the second ball. So this can go one for 20-30mins and he doesn't stop running/sprinting. Usually within about 15-20mins he really starts to slow down...but he'd keep it up till he passed out if I let him :)
 

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I've found fetch and frisbee to be the fastest way to wear out my pup. I'll take two balls (or frisbees) out with me; throw one, he gets it, drops it at my feet, runs around me, and I immediately throw the second ball. So this can go one for 20-30mins and he doesn't stop running/sprinting. Usually within about 15-20mins he really starts to slow down...but he'd keep it up till he passed out if I let him :)
Dog classes would start really helping all of the current issues you are having, and prevent other ones from popping up.

PLUS would help with the mental stimulation and exercise. Socialization with people and places and other dogs. BONDING for you and your pup.

Leaving a dog outside alone on a tie-out isn't helping with training or bonding (though it's fine for a bit if you don't have a fence). For bonding/training/leadership which are ALL necessary to get your dog to prefer being with you than out in the yard without you..... training is a huge help.

The exercise suggested above is also a great suggestion.
 

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A couple of things:
What happens when she comes to you? Do you then go on a walk? Have a great play session? Or just go inside or do something boringly mundane? WHENEVER my dogs come to me (except for coming in the back door) they get something special. We never go straight back to the car or the house after a recall. If I was having trouble on off lead recalls, the dogs would not be coming straight in the house after a recall to the back door either.

If you have a large yard where you can do this, have a very long line on her, put her in a sit, have a friend hold her, you run away yelling "come! xx come!" in the most excited voice you can. About 40 feet out, your friend releases the dog, you continue running and calling about 5 seconds you turn around and stop. Guess who is right there sliding to a stop in front of you? This has worked for me on the dogs I have had since I learned about it.
I have owned a Samoyd & an Elkhound/gsd x. They were my dogs before I learned about this but it has worked great with other dogs that needed their recall built.

Final point: Can't take the dogs because it is icy. I was nearly 50 when I moved to the mountains in Colorado. I lived on a hillside. The roads were packed and slick. I landed on my keester often. I walked my dog morning and night. Ten years ago I lived in SW Wyoming. I walked my dogs morning and night, winter and summer, snow rain ice sleet sun wind. If you don't get them out, if you don't play and excersize, they will take themselves on walks, create play from things you don't want used as toys etc. Heck, get some crampons for your shoes - walk your dog.
 

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I'm just wondering about your tie-out routine.

When she is on the tie-out, and you call her to you, is it to take the tie-out off? No wonder she comes.

And when the tie-out is off, and you call her, is it to put her back on the tie-out or to go inside? No wonder she ignores you.

As others have said, you have to make coming to you the mostest funnest, bestest thing in the world. She isn't stubborn, she is smart, smart, smart!!!

Agree with the others, make coming to you a VERY rewarding thing.
And classes and more exercise really help too!
 
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