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Hi, I don't know if this is a good thing or bad, but my 4.75 month pup barks every time she sees someone with a large stick. Or even a when I wipe the floor with a towel. When she notices a statue or a big item in the street like a couch or tv someone is throwing out she barks at it. Maybe it's just normal puppy stuff since she is still young, or maybe it's fear based. Just wanted to hear if anyone had this issue and what it might mean. I have been socializing her since 10 weeks old, bringing her to stores and all through out NYC. She is used to fire trucks, she licks toddlers feet (cute sight). She is very gentle with kids and is friendly to strangers who want to meet her.
I want to introduce her to protection work, or simply just imprint on it but am not sure where to start.
 

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That's a fairly common behavior.Just let her check it out.Stand with her while she gets a good look and sniff.The funniest thing Samson ever barked at was when the homeowners of a house we pass by occasionally,pruned their shrubs into round shapes.He didn't like that one bit!He crept up to a shrub very carefully( in case it attacked) and I could see his whole body relax after he got a sniff:)
 

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My GS girl biggest enemy is rake, she will not rest when rake is out. One day, early in the spring, she lost her voice barking two hours at rake. We try a lot to de-sensitize, at the end, no raking when dog is present, LOL.
 

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Barking at mops, canes, sticks and towels is prey drive. NO! and redirect her attention. My Rottie mix would attack the shovel or the leaf rake whenever it was in use. I still haven't decided if the behaviour was amusing or annoying. I have pictures of her wrestling the snow shovel out of my hand and running away with it!

Like Dogma said, over-all, pretty typical puppy behaviour. They go through funny phases at this age. Something totally harmless one day, is a big puppy-eating monster the next. Just laugh it off, encourage her to investigate and see it isn't anything to worry about. Go about your walks in a matter of fact way. I'd either laugh out loud to show my dog or pup that it was nothing, or act like the object of their suspicion is the Most. Boring. Thing. on Earth.
Pup will look to you for guidance on what is the appropriate reaction if they are unsure, make sure you are grounded and solid in the energy you give out to reassure you pup.

Do not make a big thing out of it, or try to calm them with praise - that is positive feedback that re-inforces their unwanted behaviour.
 

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I have always crated them when raking, mopping etc. They would see what I was doing and never developed a habit like barking or biting the tools. At around 9 months of age, after they consistently mastered "Leave It!" and "Down Stay", would they be loose during my cleaning sprees. If a pup sees something he worries about, I tell him, "Go see!" and walk up to the danger with him, touch it, let it make sounds etc. You also have to maintain an upbeat vice and attitude (see the humor in your crazy pup). Once they trust you, they will take your cues. Later, that command encourages them to investigate instead of running from it. Has always worked beautifully. It helps when you start with a stable temperamented pup though.
(Wow, I just saw that is my 5000th post. Crazy!!!! Have I earned a puppy now? )
 

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I have always crated them when raking, mopping etc. They would see what I was doing and never developed a habit like barking or biting the tools. At around 9 months of age, after they consistently mastered "Leave It!" and "Down Stay", would they be loose during my cleaning sprees. If a pup sees something he worries about, I tell him, "Go see!" and walk up to the danger with him, touch it, let it make sounds etc. You also have to maintain an upbeat vice and attitude (see the humor in your crazy pup). Once they trust you, they will take your cues. Later, that command encourages them to investigate instead of running from it. Has always worked beautifully. It helps when you start with a stable temperamented pup though.
(Wow, I just saw that is my 5000th post. Crazy!!!! Have I earned a puppy now? )

This is what we did/ do as well. Except our two year old still gets excited over the vacuum. But when you think about it, it smells like everyone and everything about home, all compacted into one place. And the machine itself takes on the classic, "play with me bow". So I reward him for sitting quietly or lock him out of the room.

He used to bark at all things new, and we giggled when he barked at statues. And at one 1/2 he barked at a stuff dog toy which surprised us. We always patiently took the time for him to cautiously approach these things. Especially a sculpture of two women sitting cross legged on the ground. They looked like "hoomans" but didn't move or smell right. Of course he barked.
 

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She is very gentle with kids and is friendly to strangers who want to meet her.
I want to introduce her to protection work, or simply just imprint on it but am not sure where to start.
For protection work, especially at this age, use that desire to chase the broom and instead of that have them chase a rag on a rope. Get down on the pup's level and play some tug of war with the rag. Pat the pup while you play, tell him he's a good boy. And now and then let the pup win and trot around proudly with his prize. That will build confidence that he'll need when he meets a trainer for protection. It starts with that prey drive that makes sweeping and raking a bit trickier. :wink2:
 
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