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Yes, he had field labs. Shudder. Even the name makes me cringe. For an animal lover, as much as I love GSD’s is probably as much as I dislike field labs. Not sure I’ve ever run into an English lab. I tend to lump all labs and Golden’s into the “no thank you” category. I guess I have a strong aversion to certain breeds. But, if it comes down to needing a lab, I would be willing to work with it, I’m just afraid I would never be able to bond or love it, which seems cruel to me.

Doodle don’t! Those are even worse than a lab or golden for me. I think I may be breed prejudice. Lol

I am 5’2, so it will likely be easier than an adult male needing one. I’m losing weight now that I kicked my Red Bull habit, and have been more active since learning I may not always have the option to be active, so hopefully I’ll be down to my regular weight by the time I need assistance, which is between 98-105lbs. Depression, lack of activity, and bad eating and drinking habits put a lot of extra weight on me, which is as bad as extra weight on a GSD, so I’m actively working on that. I’ll post a pic of my normal body size and what I am now, maybe that will help with determining how large a breed I’ll need? First 3 are my normal body size, up until the accident. The last two are after. And yes, I got kicked out of the store for being in the cart ?
I completely understand your aversion towards goldens and labs. I was the same way and still am for the most part. Unfortunately for me I love shepherds but won't get one until I'm no longer renting and moving around. The other breeds I'm interested in are either not available or a bad match for right now. Anybody living in my town I would tell them to not buy a golden here or to be very careful. There's a popular but terrible breeder. I've been around her dogs cancer, dog aggression, and not really bonding to humans are traits for her dogs.

As for labs my relatives have field labs and dang are they obnoxious! I never wanted to own one like that and the one lab I tried awhile back was a lot of work, mainly due to his old owners but also was just not very bright. Overall not a good matchup and further pushed me from labs.

However I did decide it wouldn't at least hurt to meet some puppies as they had older puppies which is what I was wanting. And at least then I could say I looked at labs and didn't like them. True to that I didn't like my puppy's brother or sister but he is amazing.

As long as the files post correctly, the one laying down with the harness is at a public store. I was looking at dog toys on a shelf trying to decide what to buy, apparently I was taking too long. The one outside I took both my dogs outside so they could play and run off some steam. He decided it was nicer to just lay by me. And then in the kennel, with free rein of the house he just goes and sits in there. I still don't really like my family members labs but there are good ones out there that may work well for what you're wanting. Especially if you're needing a dog to retrieve items for you. I've also found labs and german shepherds do well together as play mates.

With your size it should be much easier for you to find a dog that'll work because you won't necessarily need a monster like somebody who is much taller and heavier.
 

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As for the pricing, my attorney is pushing this as an added cost for the upcoming deposition. He said it really depends on whether they settle, counter offer, or go straight to trial afterwards. It can be argued that the accident caused the initial damage, but surgery, putting on weight, low activity levels could contribute to the necessity of a service animal, and it may or may not be paid for. Regardless of how the case goes, we have plenty of things we can sell to get the money together without drastically altering our lifestyles. I’m sure the dog will return the dividend in the first year alone.

Floki’s size concerns me a bit, but this is my first Mal, so it could be typical of the breed. He’s 7 close to 8 months, and is only 21 inches at the withers. I’m not sure that he will get tall enough for me to be able to grasp the handle without hunching over. Although I may not even be able to grasp one tight enough by then. I really don’t know. I easily drop cups, so I’ve resorted to plastic ones that don’t shatter into a zillion pieces all over the floor when I do drop one.
 

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I don't have time for a long post, but I will expound on this further later if you wish.

I would recommend a molosser breed for mobility work. I use a Cane Corso who is a great service dog. He is super calm and in touch with me. He is big enough and strong enough to balance me and help me up off the floor. He is also super easy to train. Most of them are highly food motivated and once they learn something, it's there forever. I would choose one of the smaller molosser breeds. Most of them are healthy and athletic enough to actually do work. A Rottweiler could be a good choice, but you need to find the right dog. They can be very vocal in a rough sounding way. Something to be aware of.

I know a couple trainers that specialize in molosser breed mobility dogs if you are interested. I will find out if they have any prospects in the works right now.
 

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You are correct. Only dogs and miniature horses have access rights. All other species have no access rights at all.

Excellent advice. It is very hard to find a dog with the right temperament for service dog work, so getting picky about breeds can make things difficult. Although my girlfriend and I have always insisted on GSDs as service dogs, we would use almost any breed of suitable size if we could not find a GSD that could do the job.

As for Shiloh Shepherds, which JChrest mentioned, they used to be outstanding potential service dogs. But the breed has deteriorated to the point where they are often skittish nervebags. I don't even recommend them as pets anymore.

I've also mostly given up on shelter dogs as potential service dogs. But here's an exception: JChrest, why don't you train Floki to be your service dog? From your earlier posts, he sounds like he has the right stuff, and you could use a service dog now. You decide when to get a service dog, not your doc.

I totally agree.

It has gotten harder and harder. In recent years, I've had the best luck with GSDs from good quality American lines.
My next SD was supposed to be a Shiloh, but thankfully, the breeder decided to sell my puppy out from under me, 5 days before pickup. I think she knew her dogs would blow the temperament test and I might be "difficult"-- though she's the one who micromanages her puppy owners, I'm so so happy she changed her mind on me.

I stumbled literally onto Daisy the very next day--a long haired puppy of parents I know, kind sensible stable parents. She is already doing great work as a puppy, she brings me things, usually even things I want! (she's 17 weeks) she's working off leash among my chickens without any return to a prior attack on a hen. When I fell yesterday, she...well she went insane on me, licking, leaping, nuzzling and making me laugh hard with her solicitousness. Then she helped me to my knees, still laughing. We have lots of work to do...

She's super smart and where Ellie really doesn't want anything to do with other people, Daisy's a "people person". Her job right now is to just learn, be a puppy and grow into the dog I need. I didn't get the dog I wanted (at first) but I certainly got the dog I need. My husband and I agree, we will never be without a German Shepherd or 2 again. This is our breed, forever.
 

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I don't have time for a long post, but I will expound on this further later if you wish.

I would recommend a molosser breed for mobility work. I use a Cane Corso who is a great service dog. He is super calm and in touch with me. He is big enough and strong enough to balance me and help me up off the floor. He is also super easy to train. Most of them are highly food motivated and once they learn something, it's there forever. I would choose one of the smaller molosser breeds. Most of them are healthy and athletic enough to actually do work. A Rottweiler could be a good choice, but you need to find the right dog. They can be very vocal in a rough sounding way. Something to be aware of.

I know a couple trainers that specialize in molosser breed mobility dogs if you are interested. I will find out if they have any prospects in the works right now.
I would love the information when you have time. I’ve worked with Cane Corso’s in the past. They certainly are a sturdy breed, and I’ve never experienced aggression with the few I worked. They came to me “aggressive” but really just weren’t ever trained. I’m used to Rottweilers as well, my parents bred and trained them. Amazing dogs, and my second favorite breed, but I haven’t found much luck in a breeder for one.
 

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I would love the information when you have time. I’ve worked with Cane Corso’s in the past. They certainly are a sturdy breed, and I’ve never experienced aggression with the few I worked. They came to me “aggressive” but really just weren’t ever trained. I’m used to Rottweilers as well, my parents bred and trained them. Amazing dogs, and my second favorite breed, but I haven’t found much luck in a breeder for one.
You bet. I will contact Willie and see if it's OK to post her info here.
 

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I sent you some info. I don’t know if it’s possible but you might want to see if you could become a puppy raiser. Then it would be easier to get a trained dog later on.
 

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https://m.facebook.com/DuePraiseDogTraining/

Here's Willie's training page. She's in the know when it comes to molosser breed service dogs and others that train and use them. She mentioned a Great Dane in the works.
 

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I don't have time for a long post, but I will expound on this further later if you wish.

I would recommend a molosser breed for mobility work. I use a Cane Corso who is a great service dog. He is super calm and in touch with me. He is big enough and strong enough to balance me and help me up off the floor. He is also super easy to train. Most of them are highly food motivated and once they learn something, it's there forever. I would choose one of the smaller molosser breeds. Most of them are healthy and athletic enough to actually do work. A Rottweiler could be a good choice, but you need to find the right dog. They can be very vocal in a rough sounding way. Something to be aware of.

I know a couple trainers that specialize in molosser breed mobility dogs if you are interested. I will find out if they have any prospects in the works right now.
I would love the information when you have time. I’ve worked with Cane Corso’s in the past. They certainly are a sturdy breed, and I’ve never experienced aggression with the few I worked. They came to me “aggressive” but really just weren’t ever trained. I’m used to Rottweilers as well, my parents bred and trained them. Amazing dogs, and my second favorite breed, but I haven’t found much luck in a breeder for one.
If I were looking for a Rottie, I would contact Firehouse Rottweilers. I've been around just one of their dogs, but I was really impressed. Even if they don't recommend one of their dogs, they may be able to point you in the right direction.

Be very wary of Cane Corso breeders. They are becoming popular, and with that comes the usual problems. A good CC has all the traits I look for in a service dog, but I'm not sure where I would go to find one. I lucked into mine.
 

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You may ask Steve Strom about rotts. I seem to remember him working one back in the day. I may be wrong however. One had a lot of concussions. ?
 

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I would look at a Dane.
They are easy going enough to blend in about any situation and almost completely immune to nonsense. They are extremely willing to please and adore helping their owners.
I'm thinking that with other critters, dogs, kids, etc a Dane would be a good breed to consider.
 

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Okay, I know I’m verging on super picky (and by verge I mean I’ve jumped that cliff already), I absolutely love Danes, my father in law has always had one. But the slobber. Sigh. My mother in law has to scrub slobber off the walls at Dane height everyday.
 

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Okay, I know I’m verging on super picky (and by verge I mean I’ve jumped that cliff already), I absolutely love Danes, my father in law has always had one. But the slobber. Sigh. My mother in law has to scrub slobber off the walls at Dane height everyday.
It depends on the jowls. My Rott was worse then my Dane. So was Bud. Lol.
Incidentally, my Dane was much more trainable and responsive then any of the Rottweilers I dealt with. As soon as I can get on my laptop I will send you a Freeway picture. She was a therapy dog, deaf and trained entirely using asl and gestures with a couple of light cues as well.
 

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With your body size you don't need a dog as big as a corso or a dane. It is much easier to maneuver in public with a medium sized dog.

I was just thinking not that long ago maybe someone should start a new breed for service work maybe crossing danes and labs to get a slightly bigger, stronger, easy to groom alternative for service work for ppl who need a dog bigger than a lab

CCI routinely crosses goldens and labs for their service dogs
 
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