German Shepherds Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Sup guys. . Is anyone's gsd a service dog? I want to get my dog certified? Does anyone have v any info they can give greatly appreciated!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,844 Posts
There is no certification for service dogs required in the USA.

What do you want the dog to do? SDs must be trained to mitigate a perso/ disability.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
478 Posts
I don't about trainers in CA , I'm in NJ.

We researched a lot a found a trainer with a good reputation who is experienced with training and certifying service dogs. You need to find one that is willing to evaluate an existing dog.

It is very lucky if you have an existing dog that will make the cut and become a service dog in training. Until they do pass and are officially under training for tasks that mitigate disability they do not have privileges to go places where pets are not normally allowed.

Keep in mind the temperament testing and ability testing goes far beyond how well they know obedience. Keep an open mind and realize that even dogs that are top notch obedience trained still may not have that type of personality required to be service dog.

We are taking a gamble with a pup that seems to have potential. My trainer was very specific that most dogs do not make the cut. Our existing dogs are impeccably behaved but do not have the right temperament plus they are older and pretty formed in their dispositions. We have hopes on the pup but realize the outcome may well be an extremely well trained loved family dog that will make a great guardian , but may not make the grade to go freely in public as an SD.

Understanding that getting an already certified SD is impossible here ..there is a 2 year waiting list with all the agencies that provide affordable dogs..privately trained and certified run about 30K :shocked:

Good luck. What type of tasks are you looking for ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,892 Posts
Fiona is GSD. And training to be my service dog. There is no certification, but you can get a license for assistance dog at the same place you license your dog. You sign paperwork that says if you lie it is a felony.

It is a good idea to have a doctor's note with you. It is not needed, but both work and my HOA insisted on it.


Sent from Petguide.com Free App
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,495 Posts
Understanding that getting an already certified SD is impossible here ..there is a 2 year waiting list with all the agencies that provide affordable dogs..privately trained and certified run about 30K :shocked:
Wouldn't it take almost that long to start from a puppy and get them to a fully trained service dog anyway?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
658 Posts
My GSD cross is a service dog. And as said there is no legitimate certification for Service Dogs. (A lot of online scams though)

And also, as said, the dog needs to be trained to do an actual task that mitigates your disability. A dog that helps with anxiety or depression does not count as a service dog and does not have public access rights.

There are a few organizations, normally through the ADI, that has a "Public Access Test" but this is a way for them to test their own dogs before placing. A way to prove their training, if that makes sense? It's not something you have to do.

I went ahead and got a local dog trainer follow us on an outing and do a write up on what he saw, and demonstrated Dakota's tasks that I could. But when you're out and about on the town, staff can't ask you for that type of info.

ADA law
Revised ADA Requirements: Service Animals
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
478 Posts
Wouldn't it take almost that long to start from a puppy and get them to a fully trained service dog anyway?
Yes , we are looking at about an 18 month ( so , not quite 2 years) and 5 thousand dollar investment in training if he passes and becomes SDIT once he hits about a year and finished intermediate and CGC with this same trainer.

Plus , it is a MINIMUM of 2 years with the agency. Some people were waiting longer.

Also , we have 2 existing dogs and the agencies frowned on that . The specifically said I would have to rehome at the very least my mastiff. I no speak "rehome" .

And , all the agencies I contacted only offered labradoodles. A few labs , but they said everything was leaning more and more towards labradoodles these days :confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,495 Posts
And also, as said, the dog needs to be trained to do an actual task that mitigates your disability. A dog that helps with anxiety or depression does not count as a service dog and does not have public access rights.
Actually there are service dogs for anxiety/depression. The condition must disabling and the dog does tasks to mitigate the disability to be a service dog, but these conditions can be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,323 Posts
And also, as said, the dog needs to be trained to do an actual task that mitigates your disability. A dog that helps with anxiety or depression does not count as a service dog and does not have public access rights.
I think you're thinking of an Emotional Support Dog. However, there are service dogs for extreme cases of anxiety-- such as severe PTSD.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
658 Posts
If simply the dog's presence helps with the issue, then no it is not a service dog. By definition it has to do an actual task. I do of people with PTSD whose dogs do help, but again they actually perform a task when an "attack" occurs. That's what I mean. :)

From the link above
Service animals are defined as dogs that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for people with disabilities. Examples of such work or tasks include guiding people who are blind, alerting people who are deaf, pulling a wheelchair, alerting and protecting a person who is having a seizure, reminding a person with mental illness to take prescribed medications, calming a person with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) during an anxiety attack, or performing other duties. Service animals are working animals, not pets. The work or task a dog has been trained to provide must be directly related to the person’s disability. Dogs whose sole function is to provide comfort or emotional support do not qualify as service animals under the ADA.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top