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Discussion Starter #1
Does anybody know anything about seizure dogs? What they do? How they do it?

My son had a seizure Sat AM while sleeping. That night Max kept pacing, whining & jumping into my son's bed.
We pulled him out & scolded him because he was weirding us out. Not to mention an 83 lb dog doesn't fit into a toddler bed.
After the third time we noticed my son was seizing.

Think he knew something was wrong? He was a little weird the day before & after also. We just assumed it was because we had our windows open at night for the first time this season.

Any info would be interesting to read.

Thanks
 

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Originally Posted By: Shandril2Does anybody know anything about seizure dogs? What they do? How they do it?

My son had a seizure Sat AM while sleeping. That night Max kept pacing, whining & jumping into my son's bed.
We pulled him out & scolded him because he was weirding us out. Not to mention an 83 lb dog doesn't fit into a toddler bed.
After the third time we noticed my son was seizing.

Think he knew something was wrong? He was a little weird the day before & after also. We just assumed it was because we had our windows open at night for the first time this season.
Max definitely was trying to tell you the seizure was coming!!!
Dogs are great at telling us things if we listen.... Took me a while to realize my girls will alert me before I get a migraine. I just thought they were being obnoxious and demanding.... turns out when they behave like that they are telling me that a migraine is on it's way... When I listen I can take my pills beforehand and only get a bad headache or don't take the pills and be down for 4 days....

Also Onyx's mother detected the breast cancer in her breeder...

so dogs are pretty smart, and know better than we do sometimes
 

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Also if he gets like that again reward Max. Because your son could be having a focal seizure that could be hardly noticeable.... My neighbor used to have a lot of focal seizures. His wife would notice most of the time but if you didn't know him you wouldn't see that he was having a seizure.

Simple Partial Seizures (SPS) involve small areas of the temporal lobe and do not affect consciousness. These are seizures which primarily cause sensations. These sensations may be mnestic such as déjà vu (a feeling of familiarity), jamais vu (a feeling of unfamiliarity), a specific single or set of memories, or amnesia. The sensations may be auditory such as a sound or tune, or gustatory such as a taste, or olfactory such as a smell that is not truly present. Sensations can also be visual or involve feelings on the skin or in the internal organs. The latter feelings may seem to move over the body. Dysphoric or euphoric feelings, fear, anger, and other sensations can also occur during SPS. Often, it is hard for persons with SPS of TLE to describe the feeling. SPS are often called "auras," and are sometimes thought to be preludes to more severe seizures.

Complex Partial Seizures (CPS) by definition are seizures which impair consciousness to some extent. This is to say that they alter the person's ability to interact with others. They usually begin with an SPS, but then the seizure spreads to a large portion of the temporal lobe and impairs consciousness. Signs may include motionless staring, automatic movements of the hands or mouth, inability to respond to others, unusual speech, or unusual behaviors. Because judgement is impaired, persons experiencing CPS may not legally drive vehicles for periods of time which are set by local governments worldwide.

Seizures which begin in the temporal lobe but then spread to the whole brain are known as Secondarily Generalized Tonic-Clonic Seizures (SGTCS). These begin with an SPS or CPS phase initially, but then the arms, trunk and legs stiffen in either a flexed or extended position. After this, coarse jerking of the limbs and trunk occur.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
As far as we know his EEG only showed nocturnal Generalized Seizure activity, but that doesn't mean that there aren't other ones that he experiences (as anybody unfortunate enough to be familiar with seizure disorders can atttest to).

I certainly wouldn't put the responsibility of alerting on Max, but we do want to take every possible precaution when we think something may be 'off' with my son.

Thanks!
 

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My Moms GSD use to wake me and alert me when my first boxer was going into a seizure.

Plus when he would have a seizure when he was awake and take off running she would run with him until he would fall over then she would run between him and me until I got to him. This helped me alot as there were a couple of times a seizure hit when he was off leash and he took off into the woods.

So not to put your son in the same text as a dog my point being is if you can train your GSD to alert you and watch over your son you will be surprised at what a blessing and help he is
 

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Does anybody know anything about seizure dogs? What they do? How they do it?

My son had a seizure Sat AM while sleeping. That night Max kept pacing, whining & jumping into my son's bed.
We pulled him out & scolded him because he was weirding us out. Not to mention an 83 lb dog doesn't fit into a toddler bed.
After the third time we noticed my son was seizing.

Think he knew something was wrong? He was a little weird the day before & after also. We just assumed it was because we had our windows open at night for the first time this season.

Any info would be interesting to read.

Thanks
The only thing I'll note in this topic is that I ALWAYS advise clients AGAINST prong collars, even during the early stages of training. Most things concerning animals are people solutions that only hurt animals like prong collars and crating
I've spent over thirty yrs training very difficult animals, be it dogs or stray cats. I am able to communicate with them and medically I'm well trained in holistic treatment. When I trained to train dogs I learned from a man who lived with wolves. I understand dog language. In the back of your dog is an are that allows them to sense beta waves. Your dog can sense when there is danger, when you are coming home, when a seizure in coming on and even the dead around if the dead chose to come around. The area most sensitive to this is often damaged by prong collars. Very bad. Crating a dog beyond two no of puppyhood is cruelty, unhealthy, irresponsible and downright lazy. Nothing should excuse locking up someone who has seven years to our one year in a crate. Spend three hours in there yourself. Then remember one year is seven to them and the eight hrs you spend at work they miss you, that's hurt enough, no need to cage them too
It leads to anxienty, bad posture, bone structure problems and most of all neuropathy. Often time in gs dogs nervous system is the biggest fail. Many dogs lose the use of their back legs. Often time it's treatable in early stages. I put the dogs on a grain free all wet diet, one B12 shot every 6 mo and call carb drops until the dog regains use of his legs. Do not crate, and please do not use prong collars. Dogs can definitely sense seizures. In fact, many can find a bone tumor by licking the same spot on the human body they tell you!
 
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