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Discussion Starter #1
Are there any peer reviewed controlled studies regarding life expectancy on certain diets or food?

Ultimately, I want to know if the going raw or using protein heavy expensive brands really makes a difference or if we have all fallen into a marketing gimmick.

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This is an interesting question. I would be interested in any studies as well. I do not feed a raw diet. I have been feeding a grainfree for a few weeks and I have already noticed a huge improvement in Ranger's fur. I figure that has to be good sign that the food is good for him.
 

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Regardless of the length of life, the quality of a life free of itches, hotspots, allergies, poor bone/joint/muscle development justifies quality food. If the coat looks great, what is under the coat is probably thriving as well.
 

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Regardless of the length of life, the quality of a life free of itches, hotspots, allergies, poor bone/joint/muscle development justifies quality food. If the coat looks great, what is under the coat is probably thriving as well.
Very good point.
 

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i dont know of any marketing campaigns done for raw food. it is certainly not mainstream. but within a week of switching i could definitely notice changes. my pup dranks A LOT less water and only pooped twice a day. i pay the same for raw per month as i did when i bought orijen.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Regardless of the length of life, the quality of a life free of itches, hotspots, allergies, poor bone/joint/muscle development justifies quality food. If the coat looks great, what is under the coat is probably thriving as well.
Are there scientific studies that the more expensive food causes all these benefits? I'm not saying anyone is wrong, but it would be good to have.

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There's not really scientific studies supporting ANY food. Most dog food trials are a couple weeks or a few months at the most. If the dogs survive the food is approved.

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A Vet I spoke with a couple of weeks ago said the only company that does any significant research is Science Diet.

He also thought grain free/raw diets aren't improvements at all.

He was down right adamant that most of it is fad (raw) or marketing gimmicks. :confused: On the one hand he's a trained professional on the other hand we've got a lot people saying vets don't study nutrition.

The only thing I've heard consistently from vets is there do tend to be more dogs allergic to chicken protein.

So .... I dunno. I feed the corn/wheat/gluten free 4 health and the dogs do fine on it.

Some studies would be nice because hear-say can get expensive!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
A Vet I spoke with a couple of weeks ago said the only company that does any significant research is Science Diet.

He also thought grain free/raw diets aren't improvements at all.

He was down right adamant that most of it is fad (raw) or marketing gimmicks. :confused: On the one hand he's a trained professional on the other hand we've got a lot people saying vets don't study nutrition.

The only thing I've heard consistently from vets is there do tend to be more dogs allergic to chicken protein.

So .... I dunno. I feed the corn/wheat/gluten free 4 health and the dogs do fine on it.

Some studies would be nice because hear-say can get expensive!
That's what I'm thinking. Are we all paying more because of marketing or actual health benefits?


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I don't know if any of these would help, but Jess from Desert Windhounds has collected a ton of studies on diet and nutrition:

https://docs.google.com/folderview?...i00YjA1LTlmOTUtNzA1YjFjOGYxN2Y0&usp=drive_web

Our vet a long time ago said Iams did a lot of studies on nutrition and that their testing program was quite rigorous, involving taking tissue samples and testing on multiple breeds. I think their formulas have gone down the toilet since then, though. In my childhood, my dogs grew up on Eukanuba. However, both of them got cancer at ages 10 and 12 so we never got to see them in very old age.

I just don't really trust the pet food industry. I don't really trust the human food industry either. I would like to see trials that are NOT funded by pet food companies done on these products.


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I've spent a lot of time reading about the pet food industry, honestly I really don't want to use commercial dog food anymore. When I pay more for a quality kibble, I like to "assume" the ingredients that go in it are a higher guality. But chances are it probably has most of the same crap that in cheaper brands.
Gwenhwyfair sounds like the speach I got from my vet, I was really suprised she agreed on home cooking for Kiya.
 

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I know that even science diet has reduced the amount of corn and grains in their food recently, and also came out with a grain free food. Either this is because they need to 'keep up" in the dog food industry, or their feeding trials are showing improvements with less corn/grain.
I also think nature's variety does AAFO tests on their raw, at least it said that they do on their bag. Either way, Its obvious that a kibble like Orijen is going to be much better then one like pedigree or Purina because it has more meat and less grains and also, orijen does not have BHA, a cancer causing preservative.
Also, the vets that lean towards science diet are also the ones who claim that protein causes kidney problems, when recent studies show that it does not.
 
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