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I'm fairly new to either topics, and though I've read a few articles on each, the picture's still a bit fuzzy for me.

I know that dogs trained in Schultzhund are trained in tracking, obedience and protection. What makes the Schultzhund protection differ from the Personal Protection Training?

^^"" Sorry if the question seems stupid or obvious. I'm new to...well, everything German Shepherd Dog!
 

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no worries. there are TONS of people on this site that would be more than happy to explain it! From what i know, Sch. is a sport which i'm sure you already know but its also used in Germany to determine which dogs will make good breeding stock. Personal protection is for those who have a reason to need a protection dog, such as if someone were to have a stalker (think along the lines of the Scream movies. She had a need) or someone like heads of state. I mean anyone can have a personal protection dog (federal permits allow the dog to go ANYWHERE) but most of the time you have to have a real need for one. Crazy ex boyfriend that has a restraining order but the cops havent been able to bust him when he gets too close yet. Live alone. Theres a lot. Like i said though, others will have better info. I could just be speaking jiberish as i'm exhausted. lol.
 

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SchH is a breed test and sport, and the standardization required for that means that the protection portion is rather ritualized. Not all dogs who do well at SchH protection will do well at "real" protection, though some certainly will. Conversely, not all personal protection dogs have the nerve and balance of temperament to be able to do SchH.

SchH work can identify if a dog has the traits needed to do real protection work, and can provide a very good foundation for later work in that area. However to make a dog a true PPD, additional training would be required. How much additional training would depend on the temperament of the dog and how the foundation and SchH training was done.

Whether a dog will truly protect in real life is more to do with the dog's natural temperament and character than anything else. Some untrained dogs will, some trained dogs will not. While a GSD *should* be naturally protective, not all are. Training in this area will not only answer the question of if the dog will or will not, but also will give the dog the skills to do a better job of it and ensure that the handler has control.

Both SchH and PPD require a huge commitment of time, effort and $$ and cannot be taken lightly. A true PPD is something very few people really need, and even fewer are prepared to commit to it in terms of ensuring GOOD training (there are a lot of bad trainers out there peddling unstable, dangerous "protection dogs") and maintaining that training, training themselves and their family members in the responsible ownership and handling of such a dog, and then making the lifestyle changes required when owning this type of dog.

I mean anyone can have a personal protection dog (federal permits allow the dog to go ANYWHERE) but most of the time you have to have a real need for one.
Absolutely NOT true. There is no federal permit for PPDs and they cannot go anywhere. There isn't even any standardized training or certification process for what constitutes a PPD. I think maybe you are confusing them with service dogs for disabled people?
 

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Many PPD trainers deliver what I call "sick em" dogs. These dogs are very defensively agressive and not neccessarily stable.
Of course this is a huge generalization, and there are good trainers out there. But often, when I see a dog that is called a PPD, I see nervy, aggressive, dangerous dogs.
 

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Many PPD trainers deliver what I call "sick em" dogs. These dogs are very defensively agressive and not neccessarily stable.
Of course this is a huge generalization, and there are good trainers out there. But often, when I see a dog that is called a PPD, I see nervy, aggressive, dangerous dogs.

100% agree with this.
 
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