German Shepherds Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I woke up one night a couple weeks ago to my 8yr old GSD (Sam) panting heavily. I assume something else was going on that had initially woken me up. At first glance when I got out of bed, it looked to me like Sam was trying to get up. He kept raising his head off his bed and lowing it. The first thing that came to mind was his hips (he has bad hips) and I thought he was stuck. I immediately went over to try and help, sticking my hand underneath his neck to give him a boost (the lights were off). I noticed when i did this, his fur was soaked with saliva. Turned the lights on and saw a very scary sight. Sam's eyes were completely dilated, very black and wide. His moth was open and was panting non stop and kept raising and lowering his head. Of course I freaked and did not fully comprehend what was going on, I screamed and that actually seemed to get his attention. He looked straight at me but looked through me like he could here me but couldn't see me. This went on probably less than a minute, some how, I think because at that point I was still freaking he got up and tried to come over to me (still panting and eyes fully dilated) like possessed. but he couldn't walk. He kept falling, but managed to keep getting up and managed to get to where I was. At this point I think he could hear me and was coming out of it. Once he was fully out of it, I managed to get him into the car to the ER.. this is where I learned it was a seizure. Has anyone experienced scary ones like that? Are they always like that? After that he was pretty freaked out and I have noticed he is very wired lately, like more than he ever was. He just wants to play.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
765 Posts
Wow. I can't help, but I wanted to let you know I'm sorry to hear this has happened. It sounds scary just reading it. I hope he's okay.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,300 Posts
Yep, canine seizures are terrifying the first time you see one. Some dogs come out of them (the post-ictal phase) not knowing where they are or even recognizing their owner -- they can even try to bite. I've fostered a few dogs with seizures, and the first one was awful because we didn't know what was happening and thought the dog might be dying.

Did you get meds to control them from the ER? The vet school ER near me sent a needless syringe full of medicine home after that foster dog's first emergency visit, and they gave me instructions on how to administer it rectally if another massive seizure happened before we got meds fine-tuned to get them under control. Once we got her on the right dose of a very inexpensive anti-seizure med, her adopter told me that they were very well controlled. It was also a little bit of an ordeal to get the dosing exactly right, as there is a narrow therapeutic range so we had to go back to re-run the bloodwork regularly until they figured out the exact right amount to maintain that range.

Did they have any idea as to the cause? Sometimes it can be poisoning. While genetic epilepsy also exists, it usually emerges earlier, by around year 5. Brain tumors are also on the list of possibilities, unfortunately. I will say though that the foster dog I had with seizures was older too, and she lived at least 5 more years (probably 13-ish by the time she passed). Setting up an eval with a veterinary neurologist would probably be money well spent to help figure out the cause, given that she's a little bit older.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top