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Discussion Starter #1
... I'm just grateful I use it. Apparently Lulu has quite the prey drive. Yesterday we ran into our very first cat on street scenario. Lulu took off like a bat outta ****. If it wasn't for the prong collar I would have lost her right next to a very busy road . She's only 10 months old so training for the unexpected just hasn't happened yet. I will never ever ever ever ever doubt my decision to use the prong ever again.

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Yes, it was essential for us too when our dog was 10 months old. Hopefully in about a year when your dog has matured more and with more training opportunities you won't need a prong as much. We took the prong off Molly when she was about 2 yrs old.
 

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interesting. I don't use a prong collar and I have no issues controlling my GSD.
 

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I have no issues with folks having them if they're used fairly. I just dislike it when some folks say it's the only way to train high drive dogs. And of course, if they're used improperly it bugs me as well.

Both of my kiddos have intense prey drives, my GSD mix boy is also used as a hare hunting dog. Never had to use aversives to get control over them, for us, premack was our best friend. :)

But I train that way out of personal preference/reasons. ;)
 

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I put one on Rusty when we are out & about. It's a swift & quick correction. He can go weeks & weeks without needing a correction.

I'm glad it worked for you.
 

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I am glad you were able to avoid a potential tragedy.

Prong collar is a beneficial training aid when used properly. Some dogs require stronger corrections, and others respond to softer ones. With that said, ANY training tools is detrimental to a dog when used inappropriately, even humane-marketed ones!

I used it with my GSD for a quick, well-timed correction on the lead. But I only upgraded to that when the softer, 'humane' training aids (flat & martingale; I do not care for the head halter-types) did not work. I also waited till she was an older youngster. However, I used it only for correction under distraction and not teaching a new command. And most importantly, make sure the dog is not constantly pulling on the lead while on the prong, or any type of collar, for that matter.

Good luck with training. :)
 

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I am glad you were able to avoid a potential tragedy.

Prong collar is a beneficial training aid when used properly. Some dogs require stronger corrections, and others respond to softer ones. With that said, ANY training tools is detrimental to a dog when used inappropriately, even humane-marketed ones!

I used it with my GSD for a quick, well-timed correction on the lead. But I only upgraded to that when the softer, 'humane' training aids (flat & martingale; I do not care for the head halter-types) did not work. I also waited till she was an older youngster. However, I used it only for correction under distraction and not teaching a new command. And most importantly, make sure the dog is not constantly pulling on the lead while on the prong, or any type of collar, for that matter.

Good luck with training. :)
So glad to see you on the boards again The Stig!
 

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Oh My Gosh! Hey there, onyx'girl! Yes, long time no see indeed! How are you?!! Oh you know what? We'll catch up over PMs so we aren't clogging the threads.

Gideon is gorgeous! I have CRS... did you acquire him after I took a break?

Hugs,
Rei
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
interesting. I don't use a prong collar and I have no issues controlling my GSD.
Well bully for you!

I shouldnt have defend my choice but I will just this once.

I have a 4 year old son a 10 year old daughter and a 10 MONTH OLD GSD. I MUST have control over all 3 in public at all times to insure safety. I am a stay at home mom and ALWAYS have my children so if Lulu was to be socialized properly ie (taken to the pet store and all other dog friendly locations) so she could LEARN to behave well, that just had to be the sacrifice that we made. Now if you are willing to come to my home and show me how YOU would do it with all 3 in tow out in public I would be MORE than willing to watch and learn from you.

Respectfully, your implication is not appreciated.


I see nothing wrong about prong collars as long as the owner doesn't miss use it.


Another alternative is the gentle leader.

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I think if I had been using a gentle leader she could have snapped her neck. Now I didnt correct her, she got to the edge of the line/leash and was stopped because of the prong. I hardly EVER have to correct Lulu, and when I do its literally just a mild tug to remind her. In this case she was running wildly with all her focus being on the cat.

The whole thing happened so very fast that under a normal leash situation I am confident that I would have lost the leash. Now her recall is about 80% but thats not enough for me to trust that she would have come back under those conditions.

I am just grateful I didnt find out.
 

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interesting. I don't use a prong collar and I have no issues controlling my GSD.
Would you consider that your GSD may be of different temperament and drive than the OPs dog?

David Winners
 

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Well bully for you!

I shouldnt have defend my choice but I will just this once.

I have a 4 year old son a 10 year old daughter and a 10 MONTH OLD GSD. I MUST have control over all 3 in public at all times to insure safety. I am a stay at home mom and ALWAYS have my children so if Lulu was to be socialized properly ie (taken to the pet store and all other dog friendly locations) so she could LEARN to behave well, that just had to be the sacrifice that we made. Now if you are willing to come to my home and show me how YOU would do it with all 3 in tow out in public I would be MORE than willing to watch and learn from you.

Respectfully, your implication is not appreciated.




I think if I had been using a gentle leader she could have snapped her neck. Now I didnt correct her, she got to the edge of the line/leash and was stopped because of the prong. I hardly EVER have to correct Lulu, and when I do its literally just a mild tug to remind her. In this case she was running wildly with all her focus being on the cat.

The whole thing happened so very fast that under a normal leash situation I am confident that I would have lost the leash. Now her recall is about 80% but thats not enough for me to trust that she would have come back under those conditions.

I am just grateful I didnt find out.
I don't disagree with you. You had the right tool, and even the most well trained dog can still misbehave. It's a good thing you had it on. It's better safe than sorry.

With that said, I've never heard of any dog snap their head with a gentle leader. I have one, and he would not even try to pull.

Now the downside of the gentle leader is that the general public thinks it's a muzzle and take that your dog is aggressive, and I myself switched to a prong collar because I simply didn't like people constantly asking "does he bite?"

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Discussion Starter #14
With that said, I've never heard of any dog snap their head with a gentle leader. I have one, and he would not even try to pull.
I have no idea about gentle leaders and whether or not one could actually hurt a dogs neck with one. It only seemed that it was possible in retrospect.
 

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If a handler learns how to handle a dog properly and train it, then selects a type of collar to work with properly, then there should be no judgment. Good grief, remember the "Hierarchy of Leashes" thread? lolol! That was a good one. :laugh:

Every dog has a different temperament, every handler different needs. If the goal of the handler is to always train, learn and improve, and to use equipment correctly, then we should be overjoyed in support. It's better than a cheap choke chain on a flexi lead while riding a bike! (I'm still not over that one, wow...truth is stranger than fiction, no? :eek:).

For Myah, I've got a nylon flat collar, a completely soft martingale, a martingale with a chain portion, and a Herm-Sprenger prong.

I've also got MS with weakness in my arms. My goal is for Myah to listen to me without pulling on her collar ever. Will that happen? Oh, maybe 95% of the time *IF* I'm lucky and consistent. But dogs will be dogs and even the best trained dog may find itself in a new situation and unsure.

The leash, collar, food, and training method snobbery is best left unsaid.

So, good for you for finding a collar that works for you right now. Is it a Herm Sprenger? I'm a big fan of those. The shape and feel is more "humane" than most collars, in my opinion, if you are giving corrections on a pulling dog.

Myah liked to pull in the morning to go outside to relieve herself (at dawn, no less). Otherwise, she's not a puller. But with the prong, she goes to her spot at "my" pace. I've used it so much, now I can switch back to the soft Martingale and she's all good. I just switch her up all the time - keeps her on her toes. :p
 

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I don't disagree with you. You had the right tool, and even the most well trained dog can still misbehave. It's a good thing you had it on. It's better safe than sorry.

With that said, I've never heard of any dog snap their head with a gentle leader. I have one, and he would not even try to pull.

Now the downside of the gentle leader is that the general public thinks it's a muzzle and take that your dog is aggressive, and I myself switched to a prong collar because I simply didn't like people constantly asking "does he bite?"

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A gentle leader applies constant pressure and irritation to the most sensitive area of a dog's face. And yes can cause neck injury as a neck on a canine is not as well muscled and supported as say a horse's neck and a swift jerk to either side could cause injury.

How this is more humane than a prong that applies a quick bit of pressure before release is beyond me

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I have no issues with folks having them if they're used fairly. I just dislike it when some folks say it's the only way to train high drive dogs. And of course, if they're used improperly it bugs me as well.

Both of my kiddos have intense prey drives, my GSD mix boy is also used as a hare hunting dog. Never had to use aversives to get control over them, for us, premack was our best friend. :)

But I train that way out of personal preference/reasons. ;)
Yup.

I've had an 80lb dog right out of the shelter try to chase a squirrel up a tree that I didn't see. He was on a harness and I was able to remain in control and get him under control within seconds at 7 months pregnant and on my cell (yup, my bad for not having 100% attention on him).

If you want to use a certain training tool, use it. But please do so with proper knowledge and be secure in your reasoning, no need to prove you made the right choice to anyone.

It's getting really old to read threads that are nothing more than how this correction collar is the best and anyone who says otherwise couldn't possibly have a dog with high drives or that is difficult to manage.
 

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... I'm just grateful I use it. Apparently Lulu has quite the prey drive. Yesterday we ran into our very first cat on street scenario. Lulu took off like a bat outta ****. If it wasn't for the prong collar I would have lost her right next to a very busy road . She's only 10 months old so training for the unexpected just hasn't happened yet. I will never ever ever ever ever doubt my decision to use the prong ever again.

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you wont need it forever, I have only used it until they mature, pretty much around 2 years old, now that everyone has grown up, i dont even know where the prong collar is,
 

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Yup.

I've had an 80lb dog right out of the shelter try to chase a squirrel up a tree that I didn't see. He was on a harness and I was able to remain in control and get him under control within seconds at 7 months pregnant and on my cell (yup, my bad for not having 100% attention on him).

If you want to use a certain training tool, use it. But please do so with proper knowledge and be secure in your reasoning, no need to prove you made the right choice to anyone.

It's getting really old to read threads that are nothing more than how this correction collar is the best and anyone who says otherwise couldn't possibly have a dog with high drives or that is difficult to manage.
I agree with this although I would love to see another 110 lb girl like myself successfully control my pack that I will sometimes walk together if I'm short on time without prong collars. It consists of 5 dogs, 4 large that range from 55-75 lbs, and one of those can Be very dog reactive/aggressive if I allow him to escalate. I tried the no pull harnesses and head collars. They learned to pull through the head collars in no time at all and the harness didn't fit my Dobermans super deep chest and made my GSD walk funny which I didn't like (only 2 big dogs I had at the time I tried those things). I just kept going back to the prong collar. I don't have th time or energy (or desire for that matter) to perfectly leash train all 4 with proofing against all kinds of distractions just so some day we can walk together again. The best tool is the one that works.

I also don't agree with people saying you should never lean on a tool and always try to "train them" so it's not necessary, blah blah. I'm perfectly happy putting the collars on them for each walk, they don't mind it, I have good control over them so we are safe and other people and pets are as well. There's no "rule" that says its not perfectly ok to do that. I tried once to train our Doberman to walk on a loose leash by not going forward until he stopped pulling, marker training, and positive reinforcement. It ended after several sessions of us not getting hardly anywhere, the other dogs were throwing a fit because they didn't get to go, I was bored and the dog was irritated. And I've trained dogs quite a bit (and do it as a side business now) so I'm not a novice. I just put the prong collars on and we are good to go, multiple people have even stopped me to ask if I was a professional dog walker. :D
 

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If you want to use a certain training tool, use it. But please do so with proper knowledge and be secure in your reasoning, no need to prove you made the right choice to anyone.

It's getting really old to read threads that are nothing more than how this correction collar is the best and anyone who says otherwise couldn't possibly have a dog with high drives or that is difficult to manage.
Yepyep.
 
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