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Discussion Starter #1
I noticed something the past few days.

If I correct Kira for ANYTHING, she runs inner crate,and just lays there.

Examples:

Kira was torturing Coconut yesterday.. Coconut wanted no part of her, and she wouldn't leave her alone.
From the other side of the room, I said "KIRA, leave IT!!. That's all I said. Kira looked at me, tucked her ears, and went into her crate.

Today, she jumped on the sofa, and started digging into the pillow. I didn't realize that her bone was stuck between the cushions. So again, I said KIRA, KNOCK IT OFF!... LOL... She tucked her ears, head down low, and into her crate she went. She just sat there, and stared at me, until I said "OK" come out.

I never taught her this... What the heck???
 

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Cause a crate should be a dogs "own"place where they will not be disturbed or bothered. She figures she is in trouble, so she goes into her safe place until you say ok, or she feels its okay to come out.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Her actions never cease to amaze me. :)

So you're saying that her behavior could be normal? I know i didn't enforce this, nor did I encourage her to go into her crate.

If she could talk, I can hear her saying to herself.... Umph.... In trouble again... LOL
 

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Her actions never cease to amaze me. :)So you're saying that her behavior could be normal? I know i didn't enforce this, nor did I encourage her to go into her crate.

If she could talk, I can hear her saying to herself.... Umph.... In trouble again... LOL


You taught it, you just weren't aware you were doing it. No, it is not common, but it is a very good thing! Don't ever be sorry you have a soft dog. Rare but she will be a very good all around companion. It's the ones that stare you down and continue to chew on your new Uggs when you say 'no' that will try your soul:)
 

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Agree with all the above. Let her crate be her safe place.
My dog goes in the corner behind a chair when she feels threatened.
That is her cozy 'lair'. Her crate is outside the house and she is cozy there too.
As long as the safe place is really safe then it is a win/win. Dog feels safe and dog is out of your hair.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
You taught it, you just weren't aware you were doing it. No, it is not common, but it is a very good thing! Don't ever be sorry you have a soft dog. Rare but she will be a very good all around companion. It's the ones that stare you down and continue to chew on your new Uggs when you say 'no' that will try your soul:)
LOL... The only time she stares me down, is when I try her recall, and she wants no part it. She knows, my old, lazy ass won't chase her, and she takes advantage of it. :crazy::laugh:

Otherwise, she's doing great.
 

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"Handler Soft" just means she reacts quickly to your emotion. She doesn't want to displease you--she's sensitive that way.

My labrador was like that. I barely even had to ever say anything to him--often a look or a gesture was enough to get my point across.

You're lucky, Anthony. Rocket is a P-n-V pup, who reminds me a bit of Dennis the Menace. LOL He doesn't ignore me by any means, but he's not very handler soft.
 

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handler soft - choosing avoidance -- just watch when you are out in the open , like a park , and you correct or show displeasure and she runs away to avoid you .
You need to work with her to eliminate the flight response.
If she ran in to the crate to avoid you , I would get her out , calm neutral way , not angry or flustered or abrupt . Attach her to you , give her the idea that you are not awful or unreasonable . don't go over board either direction.
you do not want this to become a habit or her choice .
 

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A soft dog won't run from you--unless she is a frightened dog. Frightened and soft are not the same thing.
 

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I have one soft dog and one hard dog. I wish everyday that my hard dog would be soft. My soft dog is so much more receptive to correction whereas the other one does not seem phased by anything.
 

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I've seen a lot of dogs that go into their crates when they're in trouble, without any training to do so. If a crate isn't available, some will go lie down under the table, or some other protected space.

I don't think it's the worst thing a dog can do, and I don't think it necessarily means the dog is afraid of you, it's just a "safe place" for her to go. With some dogs, all it takes is a harsh word to make them feel a little insecure. This type of dog wants nothing more than to please you, and scolding is taken VERY personally. This is a "soft" dog. Some people don't like soft dogs, but let me tell ya, a soft dog is a heck of a lot easier in some respects!
 

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this softness is something to consider in the overall picture of the dog .
the test will be how the dog is in obedience , when there is "pressure" to do something that is asked of it , and with repetitions .
Carmen
 

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okay, my last post on this was a few days ago. Today , looking at the "I got angry with Kira" thread I found the evidence of what I was trying to relate .
quote Anthony
Today, I threw Kira's ball. She would go get her ball, run it to me, and just as she approached me, she would dart to the left, and head straight for the opening..THEN STOP. She would just sit there, and wait. I had an extra ball, and I would try to entice her, I had high value treats, nada. Nothing would get her to me. I start to walk towards her, and BAM... she darts to the other side, near the other exit, and just sits. If I make as if I'm leaving the park, she actually ran the other way, and approached the small opening. I panicked, and started her way. She ran to the side. "come" didn't exist in her vocabulary.
At one point, I started to approach her, and she ran, and jumped over a 3 foot concrete bench, situated on the side of the park, and came up lame. She was limping on her front legs....and she STILL ran away, while limping!!!

xx I think this dog uses avoidances and if you allow it to continue to be profitable or productive the use of avoidance will become ingrained - and obedience difficult .

have her on lead and under control to prevent the running off .

Carmen
Carmspack Working German Shepherd Dogs
 

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Discussion Starter #19
okay, my last post on this was a few days ago. Today , looking at the "I got angry with Kira" thread I found the evidence of what I was trying to relate .
quote Anthony
Today, I threw Kira's ball. She would go get her ball, run it to me, and just as she approached me, she would dart to the left, and head straight for the opening..THEN STOP. She would just sit there, and wait. I had an extra ball, and I would try to entice her, I had high value treats, nada. Nothing would get her to me. I start to walk towards her, and BAM... she darts to the other side, near the other exit, and just sits. If I make as if I'm leaving the park, she actually ran the other way, and approached the small opening. I panicked, and started her way. She ran to the side. "come" didn't exist in her vocabulary.
At one point, I started to approach her, and she ran, and jumped over a 3 foot concrete bench, situated on the side of the park, and came up lame. She was limping on her front legs....and she STILL ran away, while limping!!!

xx I think this dog uses avoidances and if you allow it to continue to be profitable or productive the use of avoidance will become ingrained - and obedience difficult .

have her on lead and under control to prevent the running off .

Carmen
Carmspack Working German Shepherd Dogs
You're very right about this, and have since been using a long lead. So far, I've seen improvement when in the lead.

HOWEVER... Here's something funny.....

Yesterday, she had a play date with about 6 dogs. They ranged in age from 4.5 months - 8 months. She had a ball.
When it was time for me to leave, I gave a SINGLE recall, and she STOPPED in the middle of running with the pack, turned, and came to me, and sat at my feet.

As I said earlier... she knows the recall. She doesn't want to use it to retrieve.
 

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that's good , really good , then to reinforce her recall , give her a scritch - scrub, hardy pat , and then release her to go back to play. A few minutes later , when you see the beginning of a lull or quieter time , call her again , clip her on the lead and then exit.
If you make it a pattern that she always leaves when she comes to your call ,you're going to loose some of that happy coming back to you . Change it up .
 
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